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Here’s a new Open Thread for the Karlin Community.

— Ron Unz

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Open Thread, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. Wokechoke says:

    Too long don’t watch BUUUUUTTTTT watch the end when Hitler is chatting with Satan in the final confession 1hr41min mark. Then watch the film from the start. Hitler makes some solid points to the devil.

    I like the idea of the Tiger Tank as a sort of Mars Ultima lurking in the Prypyat Marshes then the Vistula Catchment for the resurrected T34 commander.

    Slavs really see their weapons as sacrament.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  2. The film The Battle of Port Arthur (Japanese: 二百三高地, Hepburn: Ni hyaku san kochi). The main character 小賀武志 Koga Takeshi was a pacifist Russian literature teacher who loved Tolstoy, but became disillusioned by the war–

  3. china-russia-all-the-way says:

    Iran isn’t really in the news even though it’s getting closer to the bomb. At this point I wonder if Iran is stalling for time with a negotiations feint as they have already decided to build the bomb and delivery system. From the Iranian perspective, it makes sense to race ahead to the finish line if they no longer believe a lasting deal is possible. If Trump comes back in 2025 and starts a war against them then Iran would wish to get the bomb before 2025 to completely deter that possibility. Russian support for Iran will make any war with Iran much more risky if the Biden admin were to launch it within the next 2.5 years to stop the nuclear program. I wonder if Russia could get the US to back off in Ukraine by not pledging to not intervene in Iran. The Russia-US-Iran dynamic doesn’t appear anywhere in the discourse.

  4. LondonBob says:

    When will Scholz stand up?

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/worshipping-dead-horses/

    Time to overthrow the junta.

  5. A123 says: • Website
    @LondonBob

    Presumably it was taken down because of incredibly obvious factual error.

    There are few regimes with more hatred of indigenous Palestinian Jews than the current White House occupant. (1)

    Saudi and the UAE are furious over the attempts by U.S. Secretary of State Blinken to force PLO and Jordan into the most sensitive Abraham Accords forums in all facets, including defense and investment, … this U.S. effort is a severe blow because it would allow the PLO, which is committed to undermining the accords, to serve as a spoiler, which this U.S. policy will essentially allow.

    The attempt to insert the U.S. on top of the [Abraham Accords] security ties in the region was perhaps the most destructive failure on several levels. First, it demoted the direct ties between Israel and the Arabs – which were developing nicely without the U.S. — and devastated the confidence the regional players had in such a structure since they have measured up the administration and believe it is not serious about regional defense. Trying to force Qatar –Saudi Arabia’s nemesis–and Jordan –serving as an agent of the Palestinians– was the death blow to the whole scheme.

    Notably, under the table, it seems Saudi, UAE, Morocco and Israel are proceeding alone to create such a structure *without the U.S.’ involvement*. The IDF’s chief of staff is, in fact, traveling to Morocco today and several top military officials have also been moving around their Arab neighbors as well in recent days.

    The final verdict on the trip appears to be that the Saudis, Bahrainis, and UAE trust Israel more than the U.S.

    When will America a stand up? The Khamenei/Scholz junta, puppetmaster of the Not-The-President Biden’s regime, needs to be taken down.

    PEACE 😇
    ___________

    (1) https://centerforsecuritypolicy.org/situation-report-joe-bidens-middle-east-trip/

  6. A123 says: • Website
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    Iran isn’t really in the news even though it’s getting closer to the bomb. At this point I wonder if Iran is stalling for time with a negotiations feint as they have already decided to build the bomb and delivery system.

    Khamenei decided this back when Obama was still in the White House. The entire JCPOA concept was a diversion. It is irrefutable fact that Iran abrogated the deal before Trump became President.

    If Trump comes back in 2025 and starts a war against them then Iran would wish to get the bomb before 2025 to completely deter that possibility.

    Your suggested time line cannot come to pass.

    Israel has made it clear that it will ignore the illegitimate U.S. regime and stop Khamenei before he obtains a nuclear weapon. With Saudi cooperation, a successful preemptive nuclear strike on Iran becomes a fairly straightforward exercise. And, once the first nuke is used, there is no reason to stay at only one. Tehran, Qom, and other key Shia sites would follow after the weapons development facilities.

    Sociopath Khamenei is quite mad. Hopefully, the Iranian people will terminate his rule before he drags the country into oblivion.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @AP
  7. @LondonBob

    Scholz is going to stand up when the German voters run out of gas and need to go out into the streets and throw bricks at the cops just to keep themselves warm.

    December, January.

    February at the latest.

    It is difficult to make predictions, especially about the future! Yogi Berra

    I never said half the things I said. Also Yogi Berra

    • Replies: @Beckow
  8. AP says:
    @A123

    You should change your mind about Khomeini who, after all, will be supplying his ally Russia with hundreds of much- needed drones

    • Replies: @A123
    , @Dmitry
  9. A123 says: • Website
    @AP

    ROTFL

    Two serious problems with your serial lying:

    -1- You have a bad typo with the name of Khamenei’s predecessor.

    -2- Glow in the dark, smouldering ruins provide little of anything. And, that is the only possible future result of Khamenei’s pursuit of nuclear weapons.

    Why do you lie so much? You have to see that your perpetual deception is failing.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  10. Mr. Hack says:
    @A123

    A spelling error and and what else? You’re like a child, misnaming everything as a lie, if you don’t fall into agreement. It’s you whose perpetual deception has withered away your credibility at this website, nobody here takes you seriously. Never an “agree” or a “thanks” from any of the readers here.

  11. For LatW, from the older thread.

    Not so sure about this one, [Out of Ruthenian first Belorussian, and later Ukrainian grew.] they are practically identical, seem like the same language, with slight differences in pronunciation. Seems more like it was one language that split in two.

    Not sure what you mean, but Belorussian and Ukrainian are very different languages. The former is more akin to Lithuanian, the latter to Polish.

    He absolutely did have the right to leave an invading and hostile culture and it is actually a crime that he was pushed out of his own home.

    Anybody has the right to leave any place at any time. But during the war and after the war it wasn’t that simple to do, especially to get as far as the US.

    The problem with your photo is that you’re trying to smear everyone that fled. Among those who fled were many academics, professional people, writers, landowners, lots of normal middle class people.

    There were not many academics and let alone writers to begin with. There were a few, and some of them might have left and headed to the West.

    But to immigrate to the US or Canada at the time one had to have a number of academic accomplishments, or to have been a Nazi collaborator, or a Banderite.

    Totally normal people who should’ve been allowed to live unmolested in their own ancestral country. It is a crime that they were forced to flee.

    No one was forced to flee.

    Even men in the police and military shouldn’t have been pushed out as that was their home and a lot of these men were victims of circumstances.

    Even in those circumstances most people still had a choice. You don’t have to be a policeman.

    The problem with that is that most Ukrainians are very lean and they are also quite humble.

    You don’t know that. You are not from Ukraine.

    They become very fat when they get older. And they are not humble at all, they like to boast and humiliate other people.

    The most popular Ukrainian food – salo, i.e. a slab of pig fat.

    As to the village turf wars, turf wars on the country side happened. And they were not really “ethnic” in nature, but mostly a group of boys from one village against boys from another village.

    Right, as long as they were in a village.

    But when many factories were being built they started moving into the cities, and then it was a group of boys from any village against boys from the town.

    This was mostly because they had no other entertainment and mostly because of what young men do naturally (a totally natural and healthy activity for young men as long as it doesn’t get out of control).

    Actually they had a lot more entertainment than you think.

    There was a club in every village, with a dance floor, where they were socializing. They had more money, most peasant families had cars. A town was usually 15 minutes drive away and they could visit movie theaters, etc.

    There were musicians in every village and a band that would play on weddings and birthday parties. They had a river or a lake and could go fishing or swimming whenever they wanted. Often there was a forest as well.

    For us, we had to go out of town to get to these natural facilities. Most of us didn’t have a car, so we usually would gather in a park and go to the movies, or sit on the benches and play guitar.

    They form their little bands. This country side environment may have been more natural than the more urban environment where this would not be as pronounced for obvious reasons (they’d get arrested).

    My friends did form a band – but not a gang. They played metal.

    And those country boys were looking for troubles.

    • Replies: @LatW
  12. Beckow says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    …German voters run out of gas and need to go out into the streets and throw bricks at the cops just to keep themselves warm

    I don’t think that will happen. What we will get is very heavy impact to manufacturing, with some factories shut down, some on a schedule, and some substitution with coal. Consumers will be prioritized over industry in a direct 180 from the previous approach in similar situations.

    It is a test of how far into virtual world we can go before collapsing. As long as energy-products-food keep on arriving from overseas it will be fine: prices will go up, more money will be created and distributed. Life will go on.

    The key to success is to “win the war“, everything hinges on that. That gives Russia an interesting strategy of simply delaying resolution and increasing the pain threshold. With both sides suffering we will find out who can take it longer: Western money or Russian resources-energy-food.

    There is an old tale about usefulness of gold in a time of famine with a punch line that chocolate is actually more valuable than gold. Mind you, the stuff the EU treats as money is very far from gold, that could make the situation more dramatic.

  13. Wokechoke says:

    the main attacks by Russian forces will now come from Gorlivka toward Toretsk. The Russians will come down both sides of the River toward Kramatorsk.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  14. @Wokechoke

    I would leave military matters to the RF military. So far, they proved their competence in Syria and Ukraine. BTW, the city is called Gorlovka, not Gorlivka (as it would be in Ukrainian), no matter how much Ukies shit themselves. Just ask anyone who lives in Gorlovka or anywhere else in Donbass.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  15. LatW says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Not sure what you mean, but Belorussian and Ukrainian are very different languages. The former is more akin to Lithuanian, the latter to Polish.

    This just isn’t true. There are some differences but Belorusian and Ukrainian are almost identical (similar vocab that is not even shared with Russian at times). Lithuanian is completely different from both. However, there are quite a few words in those languages that are the same as in the Baltic languages (just slightly transformed). Belarusian and Ukrainian (you can call them Ruthenian) are closer to Baltic than modern Russian is to Baltic.

    [MORE]

    Anybody has the right to leave any place at any time. But during the war and after the war it wasn’t that simple to do, especially to get as far as the US.

    Of course, it wasn’t easy. I’m not sure exactly how the Ukrainians left (during the wave of post-1940s) but it’s probably similar to the Baltic refugees. They most likely first made it to the refugee internment camps in Germany, stayed there for a couple of years and then made their way further out to the US, Australia, Canada. It wasn’t easy, but there were ethnic relief organizations that helped. This is all very well documented, I’m assuming Ukraine has a ton of similar stories (with the difference that some of them probably had to flee as early as 1920s, it was more of a raw deal for them). And, no, it wasn’t easy at all, the Baltic boat trips to Sweden were very dangerous (if you could find a place in the boat, sometimes you had to wait on the dune for days to have a boat arranged and once in the sea you were often bombed or torpedoed by the Soviets).

    No one was forced to flee.

    Fear of death or imprisonment is a very large impediment to one’s freedom. It can be considered “forced”. And, yea, not everyone who fled would’ve been killed, but they were not willing to take that risk. Also, they would not work, be subjected to or contribute to the invading power. It’s understandable (but tragic for those countries).

    You don’t know that. You are not from Ukraine.

    Er, I have eyes, lol. On average, they are very lean (almost too lean). Some Ukrainian soldiers look lean even with a vest on. And the younger women are probably among the thinnest in Europe. But you’re right that many EEs get too heavy in the middle age, it’s a diet very rich in carbs. Re: salo, that’s not just in Ukraine, but very common traditional food through out EE. When you work hard physically, you can eat salo with rye bread and stay thin (especially as a man as you have faster metabolism). It’s what our ancestors ate and were ok, because they didn’t eat as much wheat pastries as nowadays. You know that Latvians make a wheat pastry that is literally filled with little chunks of salo, so it might even be considered somewhat unhealthy today, they just didn’t eat it all the time. Probably similar with Ukrainians.

    And they are not humble at all, they like to boast and humiliate other people.

    By humble I meant that some of them are used to having less, so they’re not yet spoiled, but, of course, I do know that they sometimes like putting down others, such as Moskalis. It’s super funny how far they sometimes take it.

    Actually they had a lot more entertainment than you think.

    Of course, they had entertainment (local club house & a library, a radio with classical or pop music), but there was no adrenalin otherwise. Trust me, I know about this kind of life quite well (usually there is a larger town nearby where you can go shopping, and often times a lake, one can go fishing or hunting, berry picking).

    My friends did form a band – but not a gang. They played metal.

    And those country boys were looking for troubles.

    Well, then your friends were more artsy. 🙂

    Judging from what you’re saying though, it sounds like some of those Ukrainian country guys were really badass.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  16. A123 says: • Website

    Much has said about avoiding Not-The-President Biden as the 2024 DNC candidate.

    Could it be AOC? (1)

    If you’ve always wanted to see AOC (pretend to) do the perp walk, now’s your chance. Axios is reporting that at least 17 Democrat members of the House have been arrested for participating in the Marxist protest tactic of blocking traffic on a public road.

    Members of Congress and abortion rights advocates being taken away by Capitol Police aren’t being handcuffed or zip tied. They’re being taken to a shady area to be processed” — sounds rough!

    With unsecured hands, AOC choses this pose:

      

    I bet those designer boots are a mortgage payment to Main Street Americans. And the Democrats wonder why they are so unpopular….

    #LetsGoBrandon 😇

    __________

    (1) https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/athena-thorne/2022/07/19/watch-aoc-and-other-house-dems-arrested-for-blocking-traffic-at-scotus-protest-n1614076

     

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  17. @A123

    The hand pose is fine.

    The shoes are pure stupidity. You cannot walk 200 meters in them unless you have tortured your feet and ankles into a deformed configuration. Didn’t she used to be a dancer?

    Hillary looks like she has had another facelift and that abdomen constriction procedure. If she can find donors to pony up fresh cash she’s gonna run.

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @A123
    , @A123
  18. A123 says: • Website
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Hillary looks like she has had another facelift and that abdomen constriction procedure. If she can find donors to pony up fresh cash she’s gonna run.

    So you are suggesting something like this?

     

     

    #LetsGoBrandon 😇

  19. Ukie military keeps sending kamikaze drones to attack Zaporozhey nuclear power plant. Several were sent today. Some were downed by Russians, others did not reach their targets. Several workers were wounded, but nothing catastrophic happened so far.

    Yet the objective, however crazy, seems obvious: cause a nuclear accident. One wonders whether this is because Russia invited inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency to inspect this plant, saying that there is proof that Ukies we trying to obtain nukes. The behavior of Ukies suggests that they do have something really damning to hide. Otherwise why try to cause an accident that would make about a third of their “beloved Ukraine” unfit for human habitation?

  20. Wokechoke says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Yo, dude, The Ukies call it Horlivka. They have no G in their alphabet apparently.

    The next big push is gonna be Toretsk. It’s the next logical step to work around Bakhmut and move on Kramatorsk from the south.

    Now watch this drive.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  21. @Wokechoke

    There is g in Ukrainian alphabet (same as in Russian – the letter is “г”), but in Ukrainian its pronounced differently, much softer. Softer pronunciation of this sound is characteristic for Southern Russia, including Donbass. Interestingly, people in the Kharkov (not Kharkiv, as the Ukies would call it) region pronounce this sound the Russian way and speak unaccented Russian (in sharp contrast to Donbass). When transliterating from Cyrillic to Latin, Ukies change their “г” to an “h”, whereas Russians use “g” (e.g., the city where I grew up is Lugansk, but Ukies spell it Luhansk).

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @AP
  22. Wokechoke says:
    @AnonfromTN

    I speak English so I get to misspell any Foreign Johnny’s place names. I am also permitted to say the place names as I please. Anglo Priv.

  23. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    There is g in Ukrainian alphabet (same as in Russian – the letter is “г”)

    There is a G in Ukrainian – it is not Г but Ґ. It is pronounced exactly like the hard G in English.

    It is used rarely in Ukrainian, mostly the G turned into H – as in the Czech and Slovak languages. But it exists in words such as button (gudzyk) or porch (ganok).

    The Soviets tried to streamline Ukrainian into Russian so they changed the Ukrainian alphabet by removing the letter Ґ-g and making it so that Ukrainian was like Russian, using only the Г except Ukrainians pronounce it “h” rather than “g” as Russians do (southern Russians say H like Ukrainians do).

    Ukrainian has a soft h “Г” and a hard h “X.” The soft h is like house, the hard h does not have an English counterpart but is like “ch” in German Tochter (daughter). It is sometimes transcribed as “Kh” in English. So Харків is Kharkiv not Harkiv in English, as it starts with the hard rather than soft H.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @AnonfromTN
  24. AP says:

    This map of Ukrainian Y-DNA haplogroups just appeared:

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  25. Wokechoke says:
    @AP

    lugansk and Luhansk, Horlivka Gorlivka

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  26. A123 says: • Website
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Why do SJW Globalists have trouble with Christian countries like America, Hungary, and Poland?

    This is how Leftoids of the ‘The West’ get into trouble. Their hatred of Christian America yields dogmatic obedience to inherently inconsistent Brussels/EU values.

    PEACE 😇
    _________

  27. “ If you’re gonna ride in the Kentucky Derby, you don’t leave your prize stallion in the stable.”

    The Southern White male has been alienated from the military, so the Republic is left unguarded.

    Russia 🇷🇺 perhaps is going slow in Ukraine to allow the still twitching corpse of the U.S. to go still and cold. Why waste a nuke or bullet on a headless chicken?

  28. @LatW

    There are some differences but Belorusian and Ukrainian are almost identical. Lithuanian is completely different from both. Belarusian and Ukrainian (you can call them Ruthenian) are closer to Baltic than modern Russian is to Baltic.

    They both grew out of Ruthenian, that’s why there is similar vocabulary that is not shared with Russian.

    First there was the Old East Slavic language. When Kievan Rus’ was conquered, in the Polish-Lithuanian state it was called Ruthenian. Since there was little contact with the population of the rest of Rus’, it began to change on its own, and Old East Slavic on the other side was changing as well.

    Eventually, after a hundred years of independent existence, Ruthenian had become different enough from Old East Slavic, and at the same time Old East Slavic on the other side of the border had changed enough to be considered a new language – Russian.

    But in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth there were two regions, in fact two states, which were in alliance but were separated. The Lithuanians governed one part and the Poles the other, the influence of Lithuanian and Polish on Ruthenian caused divergence.

    Consequently, in the northern part of the state one dialect appeared and in the southern part another, and later both developed further into separate languages. They are not the same at all, and not even remotely identical.

    There is a degree of intelligibility between the two, but not so big as to allow a Belorussian freely understand Ukrainian speech, or vice versa. For a Ukrainian speaker, Belorussian is as different as Russian or Polish.

    You apparently can speak some Russian, but don’t understand neither Belorussian nor Ukrainian.

    The Baltic boat trips to Sweden were very dangerous (if you could find a place in the boat, sometimes you had to wait on the dune for days to have a boat arranged and once in the sea you were often bombed or torpedoed by the Soviets).

    Yes.

    These Soviets were simply animals. So bloodthirsty that couldn’t miss a chance to sink a boat with a torpedo, especially targeting those which were heading for Sweden – because they knew, that there might have been some civilian refugees.

    Soviet officers were spending most of their time cruising around the Baltic Sea in their submarines, looking into the periscope – where are they, these Latvian traitors, we gotta get them, bastards.

    And yet there were bombers, and permanently drunk Soviet pilots.

    Fear of death or imprisonment is a very large impediment to one’s freedom. It can be considered “forced”.

    For those who had collaborated with the Nazis – sure. That’s normal.

    Judging from what you’re saying though, it sounds like some of those Ukrainian country guys were really badass.

    Yes, if you call it that. Here is one more story.

    One of the most disgusting people was a guy who had two elder brothers. He admired to pick on those who were stronger than him, and having been told to shut the f. up he used to start a fight.

    But people knew that if he was to get beaten, then his two brothers were going to come and beat the crap out of them. So he attacked and others were not fighting for real.

    Then it was the time when the Bruce Lee movies started to pop up. He liked them, and he learned that back turning kick.

    So, once he wanted to show how it’s done, and he came up to a random guy on the sidewalk, and kicked him in the face. Knocked him out.

    And then he laughed, he thought it was fun.

    He was a badass, right?

    • Replies: @AP
  29. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    The Lithuanians governed one part and the Poles the other, the influence of Lithuanian and Polish on Ruthenian caused divergence.

    The Lithuanian upper class who ruled Belarus and mixed with the native elites there became Ruthenianized linguistically and then Polonized. The Belarussians were exposed to a lot of Polish language, probably more than to Lithuanian though presumably to some Lithuanian also.

    There is a degree of intelligibility between the two, but not so big as to allow a Belorussian freely understand Ukrainian speech, or vice versa. For a Ukrainian speaker, Belorussian is as different as Russian or Polish.

    A guy at our church married a woman from Belarus; when speaking with people who didn’t speak English she would speak her language rather Ukrainian which she did not know. It was possible to have a mutual conversation. Belarussian certainly is closer to Ukrainian than Russian or Polish are.

    In terms of vocabulary these two languages are very close, probably like Czech and Slovak:

  30. @AP

    Sorry, but “г” in “гудзик” (button) in Ukrainian is pronounced exactly like “г” in “горiх” (nut) or “горiще” (attic). There is no hard Russian-like “г” sound in spoken Ukrainian.

    • Replies: @AP
  31. @Wokechoke

    lugansk and Luhansk, Horlivka Gorlivka

    Gorlovka.

    It’s a dialectical “H” anyway – not an actual language “H”. So you are completely wrong on all levels.

    LOL – this freakshow AP nutjob can NOT speak Russian or Ukrainian in anyway. Look at the premise of it – this fantasist freak is attempting to lecture AnonFromTN – somebody we all know can speak Russian/Ukrainian ( as unlike him, he is one) ….on his own language. And he is doing it probably because I have been ridiculing him for being such a hopeless and disturbed fake on the topic of russian or ukrainian language. Remember this weirdo has been coming up with millions of posts of fake charades /anecdotes of him speaking the language……but under basic scrutiny it is obvious its a language he has never, ever, EVER spoken in his life. Then we get to the comedic situation of him not even knowing what simple words like “mir”, “svet” or “batka” mean or are.

    What does it mean this wakjob then copy-pasting and regurgitating the language “lesson” in his post as if his own, on languages he can’t speak? That we are dealing with a human sewer with severe problems.

    Going back to the issue – Americans say “semi” like sem – eye. Brits say “semi” ,like se-me. Does that make it a different language?….of course not.

    Northern Anglos say “look” or “book” with the “oo” sound. Southern Anglos and Americans say it without the “oo” sound , so that it sounds closer to “luck” or “buck”…..does that make southern english and American the same language and Northern english a different one? of course not

    I am sure America from north to south or east to west have similar differences – but the dialectical phonetic difference does not in anyway change the actual language or letter of that language.

    French has the “s” and “t” silently pronounced at the end of many of their words. If some french colonies start to pronounce words with the “S” at the end , despite using french alphabet, grammar and language…….do we then call that a different language?No.

    The exact same words in Russian that shift from g to zh , like when it becomes a motion verb requiring a transition to a softer sound…..or from “k” to “ch” – do so in Russian as they do for “Ukrainian” precisely because Ukrop is a fake language and the “h” is a g. So fake “h” in a word that is written with a fake”h”-r is pronounced in the entirely unnatural h-r , like “Hrihory” (Grigory).
    The entirely natural Kh-r , like “Khristos” (Jesus) remains the same.

    Its the same thing with the dialectic, but not literal name of “olexandr” – the very common name of Alexandr you will not see any pseudo-nationalist excrement from Lvov as an example, on any birth certificate from 50, 100, 150 or 200 years ago deviate from this name. Having “olexander” spelled with cyrillic O on his birth certificate was never done because it is not a “oleg” name with a real “o”. “Oleksandr” would always have had cyrillic A

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  32. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    You speak the Russified Soviet Ukrainian which was made to be more like southern Russian.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghe_with_upturn

    The first text to consequently employ the letter ⟨ґ⟩ was the 16th-century Peresopnytsia Gospel

    The letter ⟨ґ⟩ was officially eliminated from the Ukrainian alphabet in the Soviet orthographic reforms of 1933, its function being subsumed into that of the letter ⟨г⟩, pronounced in Ukrainian as [ɦ]. However, ⟨ґ⟩ continued to be used by Ukrainians in Galicia (part of Poland until 1939) and in the Ukrainian diaspora worldwide. It was reintroduced to Soviet Ukraine in a 1990 orthographic reform under glasnost

    ::::::::::::

    You left Ukraine in 1989.

    ::::::::::::

    Words that use this letter:

    In Ukrainian and long-borrowed/Ukrainianized words: а́ґрус, ґа́ва, ґа́зда́ , ґандж, ґа́нок, ґату́нок, ґвалт, ґе́ґати, ґедзь, ґелґота́ти, ґелґотіти, ґерґелі, ґерґота́ти, ґерґоті́ти, ґи́ґнути, ґирли́ґа, ґлей, ґніт (in the lamp), ґо́ґель-мо́ґель, ґонт(а), ґрасува́ти, ґра́ти (noun), ґре́чний, ґринджо́ли,

    ґу́дзик

    , ґу́ля, ґура́льня, джиґу́н, дзи́ґа, дзи́ґлик, дриґа́ти і дри́ґати, ремиґа́ти etc. and in their derivatives: а́ґрусовий, ґаздува́ти, ґвалтува́ти, ґе́рґіт, ґратча́стий, ґрунтови́й, ґрунтува́ти(ся), ґу́дзиковий, ґу́лька, проґа́вити etc

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @Gerard1234
  33. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    The significance being?

    • Replies: @AP
  34. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Just thought it was interesting. The part of Ukraine with the highest R1a percentage is the part where Ukrainians mixed most heavily with Poles. The Right Bank was about 10% Polish when Russia annexed it and most of those Poles, from Mazovian peasant settlers to gentry, ended up mixing with and being assimilated with their Ukrainian neighbors. Galicia had a much larger % of Poles; maybe for that reason there was less assimilation and mixing.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  35. Yevardian says:
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    If Iran truly thought they had no other recourse, they would have have made the final for nuclear weapons capability years ago.
    But unlike North Korea, they still have a lot to lose from such an act, and unlike India or Pakistan they don’t have the sheer size or intelligence ties to get away with it. Iran’s leaders are not idiots. Being just on the precipice, with plausible deniability, is a smart choice. Iranian leadership (Khameinei has always been a compromise leader and rules collectively) knows any US/Israeli war with Iran sailed a long time ago, they are chiefly concerned with intimidating the Saudis and retaining credibility with Turkey/Pakistan, especially since the 2020 Azeri-Armenia war and Saudi’s relative isolation.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  36. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    My Polish grandfather lived near Vinnitsa. I know that at one time there were a lot of Poles that lived in the area. It was the area where the Bar Confederates were first organized against Russian hegemony in the area in the 18th century. You wouldn’t happen to know about the first migration of Poles into this area? I suspect that it was a part of the great Mazovian one.

    Outside of a beautiful Roman Catholic church in the area (I’ve left photos of it here in the past), I don’t think that there’s much of a Polish presence in the area today. I’m pretty sure that even by my grandfather’s time, most of the Poles had been mostly Ukrainianized. My first cousin still lives in the area. His mother was Russian (he absolutely hates Russians, calls them “primitive animals” for what they’re doing today). One of his daughters ended up marrying a Swede and lives in Sweden today. The other one likes to emphasize her “Polishness” and still lives in Ukraine, which is odd because her ethnicity is really 75% Ukrainian and 25% Russian, and she grew up in a Ukrainian speaking family. So goes the tempo of the global village that we live in today…

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Beckow
  37. @AP

    You are right.

    Ukrainian and Belorussian are a lot closer to each other than to Russian.

    Ukrainian And Russian Languages: How Similar? How Different?
    https://www.ukrainianlessons.com/ukrainian-and-russian-languages/

    The Ukrainian language is the closest to Belarusian (16% of difference), and the Russian language to Bulgarian (27% of difference).

    After Belarusian, Ukrainian is also closer to Slovak, Polish, and Czech than to Russian – 38% of Ukrainian vocabulary is different from Russian.

    If we compare it with other European languages, the difference is like between Spanish and Italian (33% of different vocabulary) or French and Portuguese (39%).

    But Russian is a lot closer to Old East Slavic and to Sanskrit.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @AP
  38. @AP

    Ukrainian diaspora

    Emigration does funny thing to the language: it freezes, whereas live language in the country emigres come from keeps developing and changing. There are many examples. French laugh at “French” spoken by Quebeckers, Germans did not understand “German” spoken by Russian Germans moving to Germany in late 1980s – early 1990s, Indians write in Queen Victoria English, thinking that it’s English, etc.

    • Replies: @S
    , @AP
  39. Beckow says:
    @AP

    With effort all Slavic languages are mutually understandable: same words are used differently and the intonation varies. For us the Polish nasal intonation is the hardest to get over, Czech is very sing-songy and has unique vowel pronounciation. We are not far away from the same source language. Russian is the most streamlined and has most foreign terms, that makes it easier. There is a myth that Czech has a lot of foreign (German) terms; it doesn’t, it has an ancient vocabulary, but its street dialects have German borrowings that are non-standard.

    The dialects within each language can be even closer: what we call Rusin is very similar to the eastern Slovak dialect. (We don’t call it Ukrainian, that is a neo-logism.) For historical reasons the standard Czech is based on the Prague dialect and the standard Slovak on the central-Slovak from remote valleys. But the Moravian and western Slovak dialects are almost identical and until 1840’s the standard language was the same. Then some enterprising Slovak Lutherans decided that switching to the central Slovak was more authentic – they also tried to reach out to the catholic peasants who disliked Czech secularism. So now we are two. Most western Slovaks understand Czech easier than the eastern Rusin-like dialect.

    With Croat-Serb it is similar and I suspect with Ukrainian-Russian-Belorussian. When you standardize languages you create boundaries.

    One thing in the diagram that stands out is that the biggest distance is between Polish and Russian – rather appropriate, although not intuitive based on geography. Another one is the central linguistic position of the Slovak language that is probably the easiest to understand by the speakers of the other languages because it has changed the least. We are quite conservative. (You should try the food, I mean what the hell were our ancestors thinking? it can be best described as filling and not very edible…).

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @Wielgus
    , @AP
  40. @Here Be Dragon

    Modern Ukrainian has a lot of words with German roots, likely because Western areas were in Austro-Hungarian Empire for a while (Western Ukrainian writer Vasyl Stefanyk was even a member of Austro-Hungarian parliament): “дах” (roof) is Dach (pronounced exactly the same in German), “фарба” (paint) is from German Farbe, “рахунок” (count, check) is from German Rechnung, etc.

  41. @Beckow

    With some effort all Slavic languages are mutually understandable

    From personal experience I can say that if you know two or more Slavic languages, you can understand virtually all of them, if spoken slowly or written. I cannot speak, but understand a lot of Slovenian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Czech, Belorussian, and some Polish (although in Polish I should have had an advantage, having lived in Lvov area for five years, but their sound structure is weird). Some words shifted meanings in a funny way, though. Say, in Russian “отравить” (otravit’) means “to poison”, whereas Ukrainian “страва” (strava) and Czech “potravina”, words with the same root, mean a dish (of food, not the plate); in Russian “почивать” (pochivat’) is a highfalutin way of saying “to rest” or “to sleep”, whereas in Croatian the word with the same root “počivalište” (pronounced “pochivashte”) means rest area (on a highway), etc.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Mikhail
  42. Beckow says:
    @Yevardian

    …Iranian leadership…knows any US/Israeli war with Iran sailed a long time ago

    True, but wars can have different forms. What we see in Ukraine – and previously in Iraq, Afghanistan – is a reminder that wars are not easy. Large countries are simply not easy to defeat and take over. Technology doesn’t solve it and the willingness to die is not there – in wars people have to risk it all in order to win. That lesson has to be relearned in each generation., nobody will be invading Iran.

    they would have have made the final for nuclear weapons capability years ago.

    No sane country would announce that they “can do nuclear” if they don’t already have it. It would make no sense. With Iran it is likely that Russia has promised them full backing behind the scenes so they feel invulnerable.

    We see a massive increase in nationalism in all countries: Turkey, Iran, Saudis, Egypt, Israel. The ideologies of Islam or any religion, socialism, liberalism are mostly gone and we are back to the pre-19th century: national (tribal?) consolidated states tightly controlled by the local elites who eye each other suspiciously, but won’t necessarily attack each other unless threatened.

  43. @AP

    You speak the Russified Soviet Ukrainian which was made to be more like southern Russian.

    “Ukrainian” was referred to as South Russian dialect ( narechie) in basically all Tsarist Russian Academy studies, government documents, among the population, books and everything else. That’s because Ukraine and “Ukrainian” as a nation and a language did not exist ( and won’t exist very soon) .
    The terms “malorossiyan” and “south russian”dialect meant the exact same thing and were interchangeable in use. Even Shevchenko several times called his language “South Russian” you idiot.

    The 1897 census that the “Dragon” commentator has refereed to recently , uses “malorossiyan” – but not as ethnicity ( which of course would be a fake one) but as the language or dialect of use. This is solely for the purposes of the education reforms or changes that the Tsar was planning immediately after census results were available . Not ONE book in the time upto 1917 existed of translating “Ukrainian” into Russian. Not one textbook existed of teaching “Ukrainian” children to transfer to speaking or writing in Russian. Census results regarding 404, were primarily so they had teachers adjusted and allocating to teaching in regions with these dialect differences regarding malorossiyan. Because you have “Ukrainians” all through Russia in the Far East, many concentrations in Siberia, in SP , in the Far North – this is why the rech/yazik aspect and not the ethnicity was what is on the census…….then you have Jews where many spoke Russian as first language, not Yiddish – census is solely to deal with education instruction requirements on this , and not to “flush out” all jews.

    There was no attempt, intention or even gossip about trying to make Ukrainian “more like southern Russian” you stupid dickhead. Like the hopeless failure and liar and allover POS you are, you are both lying and showing extreme ignorance about a subject you have no connection to and languages you can’t speak – probably by semi-plagirising some clueless, idiotic disinfo off some english-speaking Banderetard blog.

    What they ( and then you) have done is confused references to “southrussian dialect” as meaning south Great-Russian or south-Russian federation. So in summary – the Soviets did use south-Russian dialect, which meant the exact same thing as Malorossiyan dialect, as spoken around Kiev, Sumy, Odessa, around Kursk, Belgorod, the Kuban region etc….. as basis for standardising the fake Ukrainian language you hideous moron, LMAO.

    Tsarist “i” was wiped from Russian alphabet and literation…….but kept and further inserted into Ukrainian language and vocabulary. Various polonisms and germanisms were artificially inserted into words, against the everyday use of how these words were used by most of the people living on current territory of 404. Various writers various Galician scum were lionised in this Communist post 1922 “Ukraine. All of this is the exact opposite of “Russifying” it or “making to look like southern Russian” you compulsive lying dumb wackjob.

    It’s the equivalent of the American joke…..”why did the blond stare at the bottle of orange juice?……because it said ‘concentrate’ on it”. That is the stupid ignorance with which you are cursed with

    Russified Soviet Ukrainian

    Without Russify or sovietism then there is no “Ukrainian” . Austrian-Polish-Trojan Horse “Ukrainian” is not “Ukrainian”, and has no right to be…..and has alot to thank Lenin and Stalin for, LOL.

    In fact, under this nonsense terminology , Taras Shevchenko becomes an exponant of “Russified” Ukrainian you sick cursed-in-hell dipshit. Nobody has every been larped more than Taras Shevchenko by Galician retards – particularly as I don’ think he even visited Galicia in his life

    Words that use this letter:

    In Ukrainian and long-borrowed/Ukrainianized words: а́ґрус, ґа́ва, ґа́зда́ , ґандж, ґа́нок, ґату́нок, ґвалт, ґе́ґати, ґедзь, ґелґота́ти, ґелґотіти, ґерґелі,

    YOU DONT SPEAK UKRAINIAN! Stop with this fantasist garbage ( or Ron, just Doxx this POS)

    Referring to the excellent AnonFromTN..

    You left Ukraine in 1989.

    AnonFromTN – knows Ukraine/Russia.you don’t. He has lived and breathed there….you have not. He has interests and family there….you don’t. He speaks the language…..you hilariously don’t. Fake emotive disinfo excrement is what trash like you is programmed to do from working 20 hour “shifts” on here on several different blogs for f**k knows now many years. When it is used to mask your fantasist, compulsive lie nonsense and nonsensically question if day is night for the normal commentator – this is despicable.

    Surely even this useless prick Mr Hack can get his mouth out of male Ukrainian (underage) anus for one second and admit this scum cannot speak the language, and how correct I am on the South Russia disinfo?!

  44. Beckow says:
    @AnonfromTN

    …Some words shifted meanings in a funny way

    That can be very amusing, but if you look deep enough there is a connection.

    “отравить” (otravit’) means “to poison”, whereas Czech “potravina”

    In Czech otravit also means poison, the root is from travit meaning “to digest”. I can see how it evolved, given some of the food.

  45. @AnonfromTN

    “Tsuker” instead of “sakhar” is just an arbitrary and wrong replacement, done solely for the political purpose of “westernising” away from Russia ( even though several western countries use sugar terminology with the “sakhar” root) . Books of traditional Ukrainian cooking were solely a Russian language creation, so “Tsuker” being the “official” word is ridiculous when all ukrainians fell natural with “sakhar”

    Foreign words can organically inflitrate a language. This is fine. What isn’t is artificially replacing french-derived ones with german derived ones ( or vice-versa) so as to falsely differentiate the word from that used in Russian. Or even substituting the Polonism if it’s too close to the Russian! There is a million examples of this is modern Ukraine.

    I have already given “Galstuk” replaced by “kravatka” as a very interesting example.

  46. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    …His mother was Russian (he absolutely hates Russians, calls them “primitive animals” for what they’re doing today).

    If he does, he is one sick puppy. No wonder he is your relative, shallow emotions seem to run deep in your DNA. Maybe it is the Polish part.

    But I don’t think he does. We are in a weird public mental world with extreme propaganda that triggers fear and conformism. Your cousin – assuming he has above 90 IQ – doesn’t suffer from self-hatred, he is simply trying to survive in Vinnitsa with nationalism raging out of control.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  47. Wielgus says:
    @Beckow

    An expert on Slavic languages by the name of De Bray expressed the view that Slovak would make a good lingua franca for Slavs, as its central position in the historic Slav area makes it relatively easy to understand.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @AnonfromTN
  48. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Take a long look into a mirror – you’re the sick puppy for countenancing all of the Russian slaughter of civilians in Ukraine, a lot of them Russian ethnics and Russian speaking Ukrainians. Time will show the extent of this slaughter, as more mass graves are uncovered. My cousin always had respect for Russia and Russians before this Russian savagery began in Ukraine. You bet he’s concerned for himself and everybody else within his family. Your insensitive comments, as a Slovak, aren’t really worth much here – you have no real skin in the game, and are living safely within a NATO umbrella. Don’t get me started you hypocrite!

    • Replies: @Beckow
  49. S says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Emigration does funny thing to the language: it freezes…Indians write in Queen Victoria English, thinking that it’s English, etc.

    I once came across something like that with some Irish I was communicating with in Ireland proper. The English word ‘weather’ was used by one of them in the sense of meaning a certain undefined near term (or present tense) period of time, as in ‘this weather’ I will do this or that, or, ‘how are you doing this weather?’

    I’ve never in real time heard the term ‘weather’ used in that way in the United States. I did once, however, read the term used in that way in a US Civil War era Southern diary circa 1864-65.

    Ireland made the transition from predominantly Gaelic speaking to predominantly English speaking during the 19th century, with a big spike in that direction around the time of the mid-19th century Famine. This transition to English, of course, was tied in very much with the mass exodus of Irish during that time to the United States, Canada, Australia, England, etc., a million Irish leaving primarily for the US during the 1845-50 Famine alone.

    So yes, interestingly, the English term ‘weather’, as still apparently used in Ireland, would seem to be a mid 19th century carryover from the time when English was first adopted and learned out of necessity by many Irish.

    • Replies: @Matra
  50. A123 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    We all know that your obsessive anti-American views make it hard for you to be objective about Iran… However…

    Even those who had a delusionally optimistic view towards Iran are being overcome by realism: (1)

    Under the hard-line President Ebrahim Raisi, Iran is increasingly out of control.

    Domestically, thousands of people have been imprisoned and tortured for opposing the regime, while hundreds are on death row for crimes such as “insulting the prophet.” According to Amnesty International, women also continue to face “entrenched discrimination,” and religious minorities, such as the Bahá’i, are being viciously oppressed and “ethnically cleansed” from parts of the country.

    Iran continues to be a major source of instability across the Middle East too. In trying to extend its influence, the government has sponsored militias like the Lebanese Hezbollah and the Houthis in Yemen, which, in recent years, have launched “out of area” operations targeting civilians in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    And while many countries in the region are increasing their cooperation with Israel, including through the Abraham Accords, Iran’s sponsorship hasn’t just enabled Hamas’ ongoing rocket attacks, but it has actively supported groups such as the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which have instigated much of this summer’s violence.

    Turkey and Iran clinging to each other to support is akin to drowning men trying to stand on each other’s shoulders trying to reach the air. A perfect synthesis of futility & desperation.

    With Iran it is likely that Russia has promised them full backing behind the scenes so they feel invulnerable.

    It is more more likely that Khamenei believes he has nothing to lose, or cannot lose. The deaths of hundreds of thousands of Iranians means nothing to his sociopathic rule. He is willing to lead Iran into nuclear annihilation.

    The only hope for Iran is internal regime change. A military leader would be a huge improvement.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.politico.eu/article/iran-plan-b-nuclear-deal-russia/

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  51. @A123

    If memory serves, Iran did not start a single war since the Shah was overthrown. In sharp contrast to quite a few countries in the neighborhood (naming no names for now).

    • Replies: @A123
  52. A123 says: • Website
    @AnonfromTN

    Iranian Hezbollah has repeatedly attacked the indigenous Palestinian Jews of Israel. Iran also turned Lebanon into a failed state with their Nasrallah-shima blast at the Port of Beirut.

    The malfeasance of Iran twists the entire region. All it takes is objectivity to see it.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Beckow
  53. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    This is very true, and also true of you – you left in 1989 and your Ukrainian is of the Soviet kind, without the “g” which had been removed in 1933. When I was a kid I got books published in Soviet Ukraine to read (my aunt and uncle visited in 1980 or so and brought them) – it was remarkably different then what we spoke at home, and learned in Ukrainian school. When I later learned some Russian, I saw that most of those differences involved streamlining into Russian.

    My grandparents were from both central Ukraine and Galicia but they all spoke standard (pre-war) Ukrainian rather then Galician dialect which I heard from less educated folks at church and when I visited west Ukrainian villages. Educated Galicians use standard literary Ukrainian mixed with occasional foreign words like the greeting “servus,” “spatzeruvaty ” (hulyaty in regular Ukrainian, gulyat’ in Russian).

  54. Beckow says:
    @Wielgus

    …Slovak would make a good lingua franca for Slavs

    It is authentic but too archaic. There are strings of consonants, unusual vowels and too much conjugation. Politically we have always been in the middle and on good terms with all.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  55. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    ….Don’t get me started you hypocrite!

    You already did, but you seem to lack self-awareness. Correct, I have no skin in this game, but neither do you.

    It is also obvious that Kiev is participating in the slaughter. Kiev started it in 2014 killing thousands of Russians in Donbas. In the war they use civilians to protect their forces, understandable but very deadly. The Ukie conscripts die in a war that cannot be won with poor weapons defending regions that are not going to be in Ukraine after the war. It looks like Kiev is causing a lot of slaughter too.

    Is that triggering the salf-hatred that we are starting to see? And the hyper-sensitivity. In wars at the end there is always Vae victis, so this will get worse.

  56. @Here Be Dragon

    There are a lot of loanwords in Russian as well.

    Sure, any language has lots of loanwords (still, wiki is a very dubious source of info). Most scientific terminology in all European languages (including English and Russian) is of Latin or Greek origin. Lots of words that became quite common and are not recognized as loanwords by native speakers are of foreign origin. E.g., a very common Russian word “сарай” (saray) means a shed, and it clearly came from Tatar language, where this word means a palace. Some are quite recent acquisitions. Say, a pretty common Russian word “шваль” (shval’), which means disgusting person/people, appeared after a war with Napoleon about two centuries ago from French “cheval” (same pronunciation), which means a horse (reflects Russian impressions of the state of horses of retreating Napoleon army). Russian occupation of Paris after annihilation of Napoleon army gave French and other languages the word “bistro”, which (with the stress on the first syllable) means “quickly” in Russian.

  57. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Don’t know about the others, but дах precedes Austria-Hungary and entered the language in Ukraine as a result of German burghers who settled in cities during the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It is also found in Polish and Belarusian.

  58. @Wielgus

    An expert on Slavic languages by the name of De Bray expressed the view that Slovak would make a good lingua franca for Slavs, as its central position in the historic Slav area makes it relatively easy to understand.

    That person is certainly not an expert on geography. Slovakia is on the border of Slavic areal, neighboring two non-Slavic countries, Hungary and Austria. The middle of the territories populated by Slavs is far to the South-East of Slovakia.

    As to Beckow’s mention of conjugation (comment #55), all Slavic languages have that plus lots of other non-intuitive grammar. That’s why English is a natural international language: mostly short words and sentences with minimal grammar (especially the US version).

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Here Be Dragon
  59. A123 says: • Website

    In a stunning development Not-The-President Biden Announces He Has Cancer. Then he refused to take questions about his self diagnosis.

    I know many of you do not want to believe me. Watch the video (below) yourself.

    If he is physically sick, he needs to leave office. If he is so mentally damaged, he announces non existent diseases… He needs to be removed from office ASAP.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  60. Beckow says:
    @A123

    You are becoming a parody.

    indigenous’, “malfeasance of Iran twists the entire region”

    The region is pretty twisted on its own and the number of countries causing ‘malfeasance’ is quite long.

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @A123
  61. German_reader says:
    @LondonBob

    When will Scholz stand up?

    Scholz is heading a coalition government, Greens are very hawkish on Russia, as are some FDP politicians, if Scholz would be seen as selling out Ukraine, the coalition might break up, with SPD being thrown out of government and replaced by CDU/CSU (imo this is what the CDU’s Freddy Merz is aiming at).
    Germany would also come under severe pressure in NATO, imo nothing like this is going to happen.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  62. Beckow says:
    @AnonfromTN

    …English is a natural international language…short words, minimal grammar

    True. But nuances are often lost in English. Another huge problem is that about 2 billion people around the world speak very poor English with vocabulary around 500 words – but they insist on using it. That has accelerated the over-simplification of English and further lowered its ability to express complex ideas in day-to-day speech.

    The middle of the territories populated by Slavs is far to the South-East of Slovakia

    More to the north-east, unfortunately AP’s Galician relatives could be in that middle (scary thought). The linguistic line between Hungarian and Slovak is very sharp, the languages are too far apart. There is also the mutual enmity that limits interaction.

    • Replies: @Sean
  63. A123 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    We all see your obsessiveness. Denying objective facts simply confirms your addiction to disinformation.

    Why do you need to blame others for Khamenei’s war crimes?

    PEACE😇

    • Replies: @songbird
  64. AP says:
    @Beckow

    or historical reasons the standard Czech is based on the Prague dialect and the standard Slovak on the central-Slovak from remote valleys.

    This reminds me of standard Ukrainian being based on the speech of peasants from Poltava.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  65. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Ukrainian and Belorussian are a lot closer to each other than to Russian.

    Thank you for the video.

    But Russian is a lot closer to Old East Slavic

    Hard to day, but certainly possible. Ukrainian is loaded with words borrowed from Polish, but has retained older grammar and some older words. For example Russian has lost the archaic vocative case while Ukrainian has kept it (in Russian it only survives in certain expressions such as “Bozhe!”). Ukrainian has retained Old East Slavic names while Russian has often replaced them with names from Church Slavonic which is a dialect of Bulgarian and not Old East Slavic (Volodymyr was Old East Slavic while Vladimir came from Church Slavonic). They found graffiti in Kiev from the 12th century: names were Pavlo and Petro not Pavel and Piotr (these names are of course not of Slavic origin but the Old East Slavic/Ukrainian versions are closer to Greek Pavlos and Petros). Ukraine has retained the original Slavic names for the months while Russian uses Latin ones. On the other hand, Ukrainian has shifted g-h and o-i.

    and to Sanskrit

    Why do you think so? Polish has some archaisms also, that the Eastern Slavs have lost, so Polish influence on Ukrainian wouldn’t necessary make Ukrainian further from Sanskrit as it does from Old East Slavic.

  66. songbird says:
    @A123

    According to Max Brooks, you shouldn’t fear Iran getting the bomb. They will only use it to retaliate against Pakistan, after Pakistan launches its first strike, totally destroying Iran.

    • Replies: @A123
  67. A123 says: • Website
    @songbird

    According to Max Brooks, you shouldn’t fear Iran getting the bomb. They will only use it to retaliate against Pakistan, after Pakistan launches its first strike, totally destroying Iran.

    Who?

    He does not sound like a rational analyst. Is he connected to NeoConDemocrats like Bill Kristol and George Will.

    I can imagine an SJW DNC Leftoid saying such things.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @songbird
  68. Beckow says:
    @AP

    …Ukrainian being based on the speech of peasants from Poltava.

    The romantic first half of the 19th century will be with us for a long time.

  69. Yevardian says:
    @Beckow

    I don’t see Slovak having any more consonant-clusters than average for Slavic languages, definitely less than Russian or Polish. Does Slovak constantly use ‘r’ as a semivowel like Czech or Serbian does?

    Same for conjugation, they’re all pretty complex compared to Romance or Germanic in that regard. Even Bulgarian which has lost the case-system, has unusual features like the ‘inferential mood’ (for non-confirmed, unseen events) from Turkish.

    But to my non-native-Russophone ear, Slovak certainly sounds the most neutral or ‘vanilla’ of the Slavic group. Czech (and moreso, Serbian) have that lilting, sing-song quality you mentioned, Polish has the nasal vowels and psh-psh, Russian sounds the smoothest with the ubiquitous palatisation, Bulgarian has that constant ‘eugh’ throat-sound, but I can’t think of anything that makes Slovak stand out. I was curious if perhaps it had many Magyar loanwords, since it was under Hungarian rule for even longer than about a 3rd of Romanians, and Romanian has modest amount of Magyar loans, but a several are the most common words in the language (‘oraș – city, fel – sort/type/kind, gând/gândesc – thought, to think, to care, chipeș – handsome; etc.).

    Have you heard of interslavic? If you look up videos on youtube of it being spoken, it sounds the closest to Slovak to me.

    True. But nuances are often lost in English. Another huge problem is that about 2 billion people around the world speak very poor English with vocabulary around 500 words – but they insist on using it. That has accelerated the over-simplification of English and further lowered its ability to express complex ideas in day-to-day speech.

    I’ve noticed this too, the daily used vocabulary of an average person does feel higher in many other languages than English now. Also the acute poverty of English cursing compared to Russian, or even Spanish.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @AP
  70. Sean says:
    @Beckow

    But nuances are often lost in English.

    On paper, yes. How the words are said is quite important in spoken English

  71. Beckow says:
    @Yevardian

    “r” and “l” are considered semi-vowels, we also have some unusual vowels like “ô”, but there are no vocally distinguishing features so the speech tends to be flat with little intonation. That makes it easier, but the grammar is overly complex – it was put together by a group of Lutheran intellectuals in the early 19th century as an exercise in authenticity, they even changed their names to archaic Slavic names. One of them wrote an early Pan-Slavist manifesto and they enthusiastically fought on the side of Habsburgs (and the Tsar) in 1848 to suppress the Hungarians. Commie history couldn’t handle the conflicting themes, so they both celebrated and denounced them – it was quite hilarious.

    Maybe because of our generic name or because of our history, Slovakia tends to be less Western and more oriented internally or towards the Slav world. There is also the living in truth (‘zivot v pravde’) ancient tradition that is very strong, basically that nothing is worth not living a true life, where ‘pravda‘ is a lot more than just truth, it is also the ‘right way‘, or even ‘honorable way‘.

    Czech and Slovak are very similar in written form, but in speech we can tell each other apart within a single sentence based on tone. There are very few Hungarian borrowings other than cursing – we have a very rich cursing vocabulary from all around, lots of Austrian terms too esp. in the south-west. But there are massive Slovak borrowings in Hungarian for farming terms, crafts, social and religion terms etc…the general view is that we civilized the nomadic Hungarians, of course Hungarians don’t share that view. The Slovak-Magyar animosity is very hard to explain to outsiders, even Czechs usually don’t get it. It is very deep, with a playful f..k you element in it, not always serious, but when it is, it can escalate very quickly.

  72. @china-russia-all-the-way

    The US military in its current state would stand precisely 0 chance against Iran. If Iran decides not to build a bomb, it sure as hell won’t be out of fear of the US. Even when Trump gets back in, rebuilding the US military will take at least a decade and the US public’s tolerance for foreign adventures declines evermore by the year.

    The problem for Iran with building a bomb has always been that it means leaving the IAEA NPT. Iran may decide that it just isn’t worth the headache when they know that it also will result in SA and Turkey both going nuclear and Israel expanding it’s own arsenal. But I could see Iran going either way.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    , @A123
  73. Yevardian says:
    @Greasy William

    Many countries have ‘suspended’ nuclear programs deliberately kept and maintained just short of completion, which allow them to assemble nuclear weapons within months if not weeks. Supposedly Japan and Germany belong to this group. And lol, Saudi Arabia doesn’t (and never will) have nuclear capability, they can’t even maintain basic modern infrastructure without foreign expertise at every level. Turkey could eventually, but has little reason to do so.

    @Beckow

    There is also the living in truth (‘zivot v pravde’) ancient tradition that is very strong, basically that nothing is worth not living a true life, where ‘pravda‘ is a lot more than just truth, it is also the ‘right way‘, or even ‘honorable way‘.

    imao, I thought quoting this ‘ancient tradition’ simply became popular with Balabanov’s iconic Брат films.

    That makes it easier, but the grammar is overly complex – it was put together by a group of Lutheran intellectuals in the early 19th century as an exercise in authenticity, they even changed their names to archaic Slavic names.

    I suppose formal written Slovak has a load of obligatory of old conjugations and other grammatical features that are practically never used in speech at all, like French? I hear that the gap between written and spoken Czech is even larger than Slovak, perhaps because Slovak speech is more conservative? Slovak is particularly rich in dialects too right?

    The Slovak-Magyar animosity is very hard to explain to outsiders, even Czechs usually don’t get it. It is very deep, with a playful f..k you element in it, not always serious, but when it is, it can escalate very quickly.

    I’m familiar with Romanian-Magyar animosity, I imagine it’s similar enough. I can sort of understand Hungarian resentment though, reading about the drafting for the Treaty of Trianon years ago, each country that recieved former Hungarian territory had an entirely separate team of Western ‘experts’ who worked on the new borders, none of whom communicated with each other. On top of that, they were instructed to pursue maximal proposals for Hungary’s dismemberment, with the assumption that they would be a starting point for negotiations. But instead the original draftings, in each region, were all simply implemented as they first proposed. I recall rather egregious example, where Slovakia’s southermost strip, which was overwhelmingly Magyar, was cut from Hungary simply because the new country ‘needed a railway’.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Beckow
  74. German_reader says:
    @Yevardian

    Supposedly Japan and Germany belong to this group

    .

    Don’t see how this could be true for Germany. But probably true for Japan (including potential delivery vehicles in the form of missiles used for bringing satellites into orbit, something Germany doesn’t have).
    Recently saw someone suggest on Twitter that Iran might proceed like South Africa once did, that is build a few nuclear weapons, but not announce it until needed:


    Saudi-Arabia would presumably get its nukes from Pakistan. As for Turkey, there were claims about them having a secret nuclear weapons programme years ago (at least Germany’s BND thought it was possible):
    https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article132446686/Arbeitet-die-Tuerkei-heimlich-an-der-Atombombe.html

  75. LondonBob says:
    @German_reader

    Are the Greens a CIA creation, I watched with amusement the promotion of the dim witted lady by the German media, Armin Laschet wasn’t particularly impressive but it was clear why Merkel favoured him, and the Atlanticists despised him?

    At least Italy looks like they might deliver a patriotic government.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  76. Yevardian says:
    @LondonBob

    The CIA? On the contrary, the KGB were behind, or at least heavily sponsored, both the anti-nuclear movement in the West and the German Greens. This isn’t even a ‘conspiracy theory’, simply a matter of public record since the USSR fell. But obviously, both have taken a life of their own since.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  77. LondonBob says:
    @Yevardian

    Like the neocons, once you are used to answering to one foreign master it becomes easy to switch to another with equal fanaticism.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  78. @AnonfromTN

    English is a natural international language: mostly short words and sentences with minimal grammar (especially the US version).

    English is a horrible choice for an international language.

    First of all because of phonetics, having pronunciation that’s very different from most other languages. For the same reason, French or German would be a very bad choice for an international language.

    Second, English grammar is not that simple.

    For many people getting used to these numerous tenses and other peculiar grammatical forms is very challenging and unnatural.

    A good choice for an international language is Spanish.

    • Replies: @A123
    , @Wielgus
    , @AnonfromTN
  79. A123 says: • Website
    @Greasy William

    The US military in its current state would stand precisely 0 chance against Iran

    And, the Iranian military stands zero chance of invading America. This is why Trump wisely refused to engage with Khamenei’s war provocations. The only reason why Iran failed to start a war is the lack the reach.

    result in SA and Turkey both going nuclear

    And, Greece will be forced to pursue nukes as a defense against Turkey.

    The European WEF loves the Military Industrial Complex [MIC]. The reason why they keep encouraging treaties, such as JCPOA, are to ensure the exact opposite of the stated purpose. They want an at least 4-way nuclear arms race. It is good for the European arms industry.

    Their miscalculation is made clear by the Abraham Accords. Sane countries in the region will obliterate, not invade, to stop Khamenei’s mad rush to nuclear weapons. As I indicated earlier (1), more and more voices are joining the overwhelming chorus that want to stand up for rationality. Alas, the insanity of appeasing Khamenei’s madness has significant inertia among EU Elites.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-193/#comment-5454089

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  80. A123 says: • Website
    @Here Be Dragon

    English is a natural international language: mostly short words and sentences with minimal grammar (especially the US version).

    English is a horrible choice for an international language.

    You are both correct. The bastardized version of English that has spread around the globe is simple. It emphasizes minimal grammnar.

    Actual English is very difficult and loaded with exceptions.
    ___

    The problem is that international languages are never really chosen.

    Latin is much worse than English. It became the common tongue when Romans were everywhere. Now that English is the default language for electronics it is hard to see it being displaced.

    The next step is universal translation. It is unlikely that there will be any replacement international language if English wanes. Real time machine translation will soon make such a standard unnecessary.

    PEACE 😇

  81. songbird says:
    @A123

    Max is the son of comedian Mel Brooks and wrote that bestselling but really awful book “World War Z”, wherein it was a subplot.

    I think it might be even worse than “The Da Vinci Code.”

    • Thanks: A123
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  82. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    Pakistan is potentially on the cusp of taking over many of the Arab oil states demographically.

    I don’t think that they would ever help them get nukes because it would mean that they would lose influence.

    Right now, they have a sort of military alliance with the area, and I believe Saudi is kind of reliant on Paki fighter pilots. Due to the optimization of their skulls for heat-shedding, they lack visuospatial skills necessary to fly without using autopilot. This was something that was understood decades ago, by US trainers and people in the aerospace industry, like scifi writer Jerry Pournelle.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  83. songbird says:

    During the show trial of Gary Powers, the prosecutor exclaimed:

    It is precisely these Powerses, reared and bred… in the conditions of the so-called free world, who would have been ready to be the first to drop atom and hydrogen bombs on the peaceful earth, as similar Powerses did when they threw the first atom bombs on the peaceful citizens of the defenseless cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki..

    (It is old rhetoric.)

  84. Wielgus says:
    @LondonBob

    Some of the biggest pro-Americans in the British Labour Party at the time of the Iraq War, like John Reid, had Communist backgrounds, and it is easy to suspect that they merely transferred their allegiance from one superpower to another.

  85. Wielgus says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Lingua francas in history have often become so for almost accidental reasons that have little or nothing to do with them being relatively easy to learn. For example Greek became widespread because of the conquests of Alexander the Great, but this was hardly because Greek was/is easy to learn (it is not). Although Koine Greek was simpler than the Classical version, because wide use as a second language dumbed it down somewhat.

  86. > Why did Lithuanians in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth era often choose to “Polonize” their names or speak in Polish? Wasn’t it a commonwealth rather than Lithuania joining and becoming a “lesser” part of Poland?

    https://www.quora.com/Why-did-Lithuanians-in-the-Polish-Lithuanian-Commonwealth-era-often-choose-to-Polonize-their-names-or-speak-in-Polish-Wasnt-it-a-commonwealth-rather-than-Lithuania-joining-and-becoming-a-lesser-part-of-Poland

  87. German_reader says:
    @songbird

    Pakistan is potentially on the cusp of taking over many of the Arab oil states demographically.

    You mean through guest workers? I thought those don’t have any rights and are rotated in and out of their host country.
    Bad news anyway, Islamic states with nuclear weapons in Europe’s neighbourhood aren’t something I’m looking forward to.

    • Replies: @songbird
  88. songbird says:

    Swedes should not spend their energies on trying to give Somalis a higher standard of living than they deserve, but rather should go all in on digitizing rare and copyrighted books and journals, so that everyone can read them, not just those with access to fancy, private libraries.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @S
  89. Polish is dead at birth – an ugly language. None of the other slavic languages that use Latin text look hideous to read, except Polish. Although the south slavic languages have their eccentricisms with the latin-text, Polish seems to have very little, or the least connection of how the word is pronounced – and how you expect it to sound phonetically by looking at the latin-text. So it sounds bad naturally anyway – and greatly loses from not using Cyrillic also. Maybe this explains why they have had an abysmal number of great writers or great anything.

    As for Bulgarian, very intelligible to Russian, more easier from the reading than listening to it – but certainly of the times I have visited Bulgaria – its very easy to read and understand much of Bulgarian texts like a newspaper, if Russian. Not as identical as “Ukrainian” or Belorussian though. Zelensky or Poroshenko speaking (atrocious) Ukrainian I can understand 100%. In Belarus nearly everything is done in Russian, but speaker announcements in public transport and airports I have heard there many times in Belorossiyan…..and literally I can assure you it’s near total Russian in “difference”

    One thing in the diagram that stands out is that the biggest distance is between Polish and Russian – rather appropriate, although not intuitive based on geography. Another one is the central linguistic position of the Slovak language that is probably the easiest to understand by the speakers of the other languages because it has changed the least. We are quite conservative. (You should try the food, I mean what the hell were our ancestors thinking? it can be best described as filling and not very edible…).

    LOL – come on now. You know the diseased, disturbed sack of faeces “AP” does not speak any part of ANY of the languages, and is only using that diagram to (falsely) assert a predetermined claim . A predetermined claim this 20hour shift nutjob has looked for any excuse to insert into an internet thread a million times. Probably the same claims this imbecile makes when writing as his Polish sockpuppet character on another pro-Russian ( english language) blog.

    Does a world exist where this POS would post a ( real) diagram showing studies that link Russian/ukr/belarussian as the same or very similar languages? No.

    How many times have you been subjected to this idiots BS links and disingenuous arguments? I can recall this idiotic “continental war in WW2” BS with yourself which just exposed this imbeciles similtaneous lack of interest and knowledge over WW2, Europe and confirmed to me that he has never even visited mainland Europe …but he will use obsessive autistic cretinism to look into distorting data on it – which seems a very strange and disturbing paradox

    That map itself is a monstrous lie. In any sane world does it make logical sense that the Russian world of Russia/Belarus/Ukraine, who all begin with the same ancient Russian language – then for the last 400 years encompasses shared religion, roads, industrialisation, mass literacy, developments of of medicines ( including much in common village “remedies” , the Dnieper ( and other rivers), military, chernozem (for western Russia and russian-part of Ukraine, very similar embroidered clothes , very similar folksongs, skazka, architecture (primarily the church architecture) – all this happens , but at the end of it the “conclusion” is that Russian is closer to…………8th century Bulgarian and Slovak?!!
    One would think the source of this “study” is setting out to publish results with the same predetermined lie as this clown. The University for Open Democracy Gender-Neutral Civil Society Soros Institute of Talinn maybe is behind it?

    Seriously is this a sick joke?

  90. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    They are currently treated like dirt. But legalized slavery was only abolished in the 1950s. They are on a different timeline than us.

    On the one hand, it is a different system. Big man politics, with loyalties created and maintained through oil checks. Maybe, that makes it more resilient?

    But on the other hand, that oil money encourages many to seek foreign brides.

    Plus, their elites seem to have even more contempt for their commoners than ours. Islam has strong universalizing principles. And Pakistan’s population is expected to grow 56% by 2050. The composition of their sports teams (determined by elite choices) doesn’t seem very ethnat.

  91. Mr. Hack says:

    I came across this video blogger last night (Konstantin) and watched this segment that I thought was quite good. He’s a Russian entrepreneur who lives in Rostov. He reviews 10 different signs that indicate that Russia’s economy is poised for ever increasing “downgrades”. Worth watching:

    I’ll definitely start watching more of his stuff.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  92. German_reader says:

    https://www.brusselstimes.com/259547/poland-reluctant-to-share-gas-with-germany

    Polish Deputy Foreign Minister Szymon Szynkowski responded that Poland “first and foremost wants to share with those who have already shown their solidarity to us.”
    Krzysztof Sobolewski of the ruling PiS party told Polish television that Berlin should talk about “the issue of reparations” in exchange for gas, a reference to losses suffered by Poland during the Second World War and the money Germany pays for this.
    A package with billions of claims has reportedly been prepared by the Poles, whereas Germany considers the reparations issue resolved.
    Sobolewski stressed that Poland was always ready to help others, pointing in this regard to Ukraine, a country that receives much support from the Poles.
    In exchange for gas, Sobolewski said, Ukraine would also expect Germany to change its policy on the Nord Stream pipelines, which carry gas directly from Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea.

    According to some other reports Sobolewski wants an “apology” for the NS pipelines.
    Best part is that substantial amounts of Russian gas were re-exported from Germany to Poland throughout recent months via the Yamal pipeline, which is one reason why Poland is now close to 100% of its storage capacity.

  93. @Here Be Dragon

    Second, English grammar is not that simple.
    For many people getting used to these numerous tenses and other peculiar grammatical forms is very challenging and unnatural.

    In spoken English most tenses that technically exist are not used. Especially in the US English, where even written language is moving in the direction of pidgin.

    As to nuances mentioned by Beckow, British English has a lot of semi-synonyms that express nuances well, whereas in spoken US English with limited vocabulary the nuances are conveyed by how you say it, as Sean rightly pointed out.

    A good choice for an international language is Spanish.

    Spanish has mindbogglingly complicated grammar. The nouns have gender, which are totally arbitrary and make the task of learning very hard for a non-native speaker. It has as many tenses as French, but, in contrast to French, where most tenses are used exclusively in writing highfalutin texts, virtually all tenses are used in spoken Spanish.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @songbird
  94. @A123

    And, the Iranian military stands zero chance of invading America.

    FYI, no country ever wanted to invade the US, or even said that it wanted as a threat. Invading others, often on the other side of the globe, is an American specialty. In terms of aggressiveness nobody beats the US. Israel is a distant second, KSA and Turkey are vying for distant third (not for the lack of trying in all cases).

    • Replies: @A123
  95. @AP

    Ukrainian has retained Old East Slavic names while Russian has often replaced them with names from Church Slavonic which is a dialect of Bulgarian and not Old East Slavic (Volodymyr was Old East Slavic while Vladimir came from Church Slavonic). They found graffiti in Kiev from the 12th century: names were Pavlo and Petro not Pavel and Piotr (these names are of course not of Slavic origin but the Old East Slavic/Ukrainian versions are closer to Greek Pavlos and Petros).

    Wow – the retarded bimbo levels are extraordinary. My own brother in law has “Petrovich” patronymic you retard. Millions of Russians each day are greeted with their patronymics like “hello Alyona Petrovna” or “Good morning Dmitry Pavlovich”. You heard of Petrograd , Dnepropetrovsk or Pavlograd you demented imbecile? Rulers of Russia , Pavel Petrovich ( Paul 1st – though because the Ukronazis are german prostitutes, places named after him remain untouched because he was german also) or Nikolai Pavlovich (Nicholas 1st)?

    When I was at school, or now at each day at work , when I am out – how many times in life I am calling somebody Volodya or Vova ? ( the diminutive for Vladimir, but the diminuitive/nickname almost certainly derivative from Volodmir), LOL

    Ukrainians, because they are the same as Russians, use identical patrynomics, in identical greetings and with identical diminutives like Volodya.

    So it’s not differences in language, but very minor differences in customs that join up fully like with Patronymic convention you cretin

    They found graffiti in Kiev from the 12th century: names were Pavlo and Petro not Pavel and Piotr

    Total misleading nonsense from a creep who has never been there ( and amusing how little has to be “discovered” or faked to try and propagate differences between Russians and Ukrainians in the face of countless counterexamples). It’s also completely unclear how many currently calling themselves “Dmytro” or “Volodymyr” were specifically named that or call themselves this, because Zelensky has definitely been called Vladimir for most of his POS life.

    Old East Slavic/Ukrainian versions are closer to Greek Pavlos and Petros)

    LOL, sounds like a direct plagiarism of me – but in completely the wrong context of course.

    It’s “almost” like you are a complete bullsh*tter, protected from this shameless cretinism by the anonymity of the internet

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  96. @German_reader

    No doubt that this has to be the year of extreme suffering of Polish and Baltic trash on the energy issues. It can’t be another “imminent collapse of the dollar” – it has to happen now. You say Poland is close to 100% storage capacity, but all the Baltics should be in a big problem by the end of the year on this. Inflation in the Baltics is actually higher than in Russia !

    Not opening NS2 pre February 24th, drove gas prices up to the point that Ukraine’s already crippled industries were completely nonfunctional. This industrial and economic tough position , with western encouragement/direction ,is what lead to their greater shelling of Donbass and their own mass buildup of military there in the weeks before the start of the operation.

    High gas and oil prices are of course helpful to the special military operation continuation and Russia’s economy from the effect of sanctions and companies leaving .

    Opening NS2 and removing sanctions against Belarus , with it’s northern point to launch attack ( and any future operations in North of Ukraine/Kiev and west 404) would have immediately prevented the war happening. Even now it would be likely to force us to change whatever the full strategy is, and stop our economy being fed by EU gas imports

  97. @Gerard1234

    What’s the point of this linguistic discussion? What bearing does any outcome have on current events and their evaluation? Say, Taiwan uses classical Chinese hieroglyphs, whereas big China uses simplified characters. Does this suggest who should rule who? In my book, it does not.

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  98. Beckow says:
    @Yevardian

    …practically never used in speech

    Precisely, so why not drop the unnecessary complexity? We had a large number of dialects because until the 20th century a lot of people lived in isolated remote valleys. Even today a western peasant has a hard time understanding the eastern dialect – it is kind of a continuum. The standardization in the early 19th century included all features, sounds, vowels, etc…at the cost of complexity. They also brought back archaic words and created neo-logisms. The ‘pravda’ stuff comes from the 14.-17. century writing, a lot of it religious texts, I don’t know who Balabanov is.

    they were instructed to pursue maximal proposals for Hungary’s dismemberment, with the assumption that they would be a starting point for negotiations.

    Magyar problem at Trianon was that they refused to negotiate and so the maximal proposals became the treaty. Budapest position was that ‘Hungary stays as is, we will give autonomy!‘, that was unrealistic. Something similar may happen with Ukraine – you have to know when to fight and when to talk. And Eduard Benes, the savvy well-connected Czech who had great contacts and persistence was in charge.

    The ‘railroad’ story is true, but it was minor. The big decision was the Danube border: the largely Magyar area along the northern Danube was given to Slovakia because of ‘strategic defense‘ and because the local Magyar farmers went to Paris to say that they can’t lose markets in Bratislava – they thought it would keep Bratislava in Hungary or ‘neutral’, instead the Danube became the border. Hungarians were pissed, I don’t blame them, but that’s the way it has worked out. The animosity is about more than the border – there is a cultural antipathy and family histories. We just don’t get along.

  99. Beckow says:
    @AnonfromTN

    …nuances are conveyed by how you say it, as Sean rightly pointed out.

    That is true when the speakers know and use English well. The problem is that increasingly most of the speakers one encounters speak it badly and have a limited vocabulary. A simplified vulgar English is being adopted as a lingua franca and that impoverishes communication. There is a whole new world of bad English that a large number of people live in – it has an impact on their mental development.

    Some of the simple-minded ‘English’ testimonies from Ukraine are a typical example: they are emotional, obviously untrue or exaggerated, and delivered with an irritating pathos. But even the dumbest Ukie insists on delivering it in ‘English’ maybe thinking that is ingratiating. It is like living in a bad parody, all thinking is lost and a few words are repeated like mantra with horrible accents. I would have more sympathy for the ‘vyshivanka’ crowd if they were more thoughtful. The earnest yearning look doesn’t help – Zelko is particularly bad. He also always look constipated. They need to work on it.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  100. Jimmy1969 says:
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    These last 3 replies were silly and ignorant

  101. @Beckow

    The problem is that increasingly most of the speakers one encounters speak it badly and have a limited vocabulary.

    That, indeed, is a problem. You see it clearly reviewing scientific papers: maybe one in fifty is written in full-blooded English, the others fall into simplified English-pidgin range. However, I don’t see any viable solution of this problem, at least in science. People that have a variety of mother tongues would not understand each other if they use the languages they are most proficient in, so they have to communicate in English, however mutilated. That applies to all other things including business. Naturally, misunderstandings arise, either from poor command of English, or from poor quality of the translators (when people use their own languages).

  102. Wielgus says:

    Excerpt from forthcoming Russian documentary film about the fighting for Mariupol, “On The Edge Of The Abyss”.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @AnonfromTN
  103. @Wielgus

    “On The Edge Of The Abyss”

    The pic also says “as seen by an eyewitness”

  104. S says:
    @songbird

    Swedes should not spend their energies on trying to give Somalis a higher standard of living than they deserve…

    Swedes, having the right to exist, should work towards stopping their own ongoing ethnic cleansing by immediately stopping the Somali immigration wholesale. And, acting within the spirit of the UN treaty on genocide, specifically to forestall their own [Swedish] genocide, the Swedes should help the Somalis back to their own African homeland.

    Also, within the spirit of the UN anti-genocide treaty, and for the same reason, those who joyfully ‘mixed’ with the Somalis, and their progeny, can be relocated by international agreement to their own new ‘mixed’ homeland, a place with abundant resources.

    [This should help to reduce the rape epidemic upon Swedish women, as well. Anyone at all familiar with rape’s effects upon women knows that it often irretrievably destroys their lives. Isn’t that in large part, though, the intent of the act, along with it being an attempt to get at their [Swedish] men through the women?]

    That portion of Scandinavia is the Swede’s historic living space. How dare anyone attempt to steal their lives, livelihoods, and their homeland from them!

    Stopping rape, murder, slavery, and genocide, in the inverted world of so called ‘progressive’ Multi-culturalism, is what they call ‘hate’. Being indifferent about it, or, in effect even advocating for it, is what they call ‘love’.

    but rather should go all in on digitizing rare and copyrighted books and journals, so that everyone can read them, not just those with access to fancy, private libraries.

    Have your ancestral researches taken you to Scandinavia now, and you’re hitting some roadblocks? Or, is that a bit of hyperbole? Do tell!

    As an OT aside, Songbird, do you happen to know this family? It’s sort of an early 20th century Brady Bunch…not! 🙂 [See short vid below. Pretty creative for 1905.]

    • Agree: songbird
    • Replies: @songbird
    , @Thulean Friend
  105. @Wielgus

    Interesting trolling from a Russian blogger Rozhin (https://t.me/s/boris_rozhin)

    In the old days Ukies had a slogan “No Mariupol – no Ukraine”
    After the surrender of Ukie troops and Nazis from “Azov” in Mariupol, he posted Ukie sign with this slogan and commented “Did not go well”

    Dick-wielding clown said some time ago that the fate of Donbass will be decided in Severodonetsk.
    After RF+LPR+DPR troops kicked Ukies out of Severodonetsk, he posted the video of that clown’s speech and commented “OK, it’s decided”.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  106. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    I hate to break-up your celebration, but the Azov battalion is still well and alive and causing all sorts of havoc for the Russian military, from around Kharkiv in the north, to the Kherson region in the south, and really everywhere in between. After the long and heroic stand, where this battalion held out for way longer than anybody expected, the Azov battalion and the crack unit within, appropriately named the “Kraken”, have regrouped and are poised to play a decisive role in the upcoming liberation of Kherson from the uninvited invaders – you can bet on it! 🙂

    Just issued today. Welcome to Armageddon!

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @Jazman
  107. @Mr. Hack

    Just issued today. Welcome to Armageddon!

    If you believe American TV, I have a bridge to sell you.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  108. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    If you believe American TV, I have a bridge to sell you.


    The Kerch bridge that you want to sell me will be obliterated after Ukraine regains Kherson (Ukrainian heimars will be in range by then). Selling me the Kerch bridge, like Beckow’s idea of selling me a “luxury condo in the garden by the sea of Melitopol, are both terrible ideas.:-) , .

  109. @Mr. Hack

    Interesting delusions. Be careful with heavy drugs, though.

    • Replies: @Jazman
  110. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mr. Hack

    I meant “Mariupol” above, not “Melitopol”.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  111. Wokechoke says:

    Russia ought to go grab Toretsk. It’s downhill toward Kramatorsk, lays along both banks of a shallow river and there’s several slagheaps and raised trash-dumps that would be great observation points for artillery. Outflanks Bahkmut too.

    • Replies: @AP
  112. Wokechoke says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Every bridge in Ukraine would be blown up in retaliation though.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AnonfromTN
  113. Mr. Hack says:
    @Wokechoke

    Very improbable. It’s going on 6 months now, and Russia’s “success” in Ukraine has been very negligible. Kharkiv is what, 30 miles form the Russian border? Once the Kerch bridge is destroyed, how will Russia resupply its southern advance? point, game, match, tovarishch. Even if i did detroy all of Ukraine’s bridges, it would only make it that much harder for it to transport its own troops from here to there.

    BTW, I did reply to your question about the TV program, don’t know if you ever read it within the previous thread?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Sean
  114. @Wokechoke

    Every bridge in Ukraine would be blown up in retaliation though.

    Nah. Russia destroys infrastructure in Ukraine sparingly, knowing full well that it will have to repair it in the areas it will take and in remaining reformatted Ukraine. It simply won’t let Ukies damage the Crimean bridge. Not to mention that Ukies will retake Kherson after the Hell freezes over.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
  115. songbird says:
    @S

    I say it as a bit of a joke. But I would like the Swedes to digitize and make freely available some of these hard-to-find, new or old Irish history books, journals, and maps

    [MORE]

    I don’t say that they are interested in the subject, precisely. But I do think that they would have the resources to undertake the project and many others, at least, if they ditched the Somalis, et al.

    No doubt, the pro-social impulses of Swedes have been hijacked, subverted, and misspent. As well as taking better care of Swedes, I think they could afford to sent a little to the rest of us Euros.

    (I want Swedish gibs!)

    In particular, I believe it is the natural impulse of Swedes to break copyright, especially of academic subjects, in cases where there might be a social benefit to it, and were they not under the thumb of America, they would probably make good efforts towards this end.

    I had not heard of “The Whole Dam Family” before. It is curiously a bit vulgar, outside of my conception of the time. (Especially the song)

    But, incidentally, I was recently surprised to learn that the term “Bronx cheer” is older than I thought it was. (at least pre-WW2.) But perhaps that is not surprising, as Hollywood used the area as a stand-in for bombed out Germany, and there must have been a lot of rot there.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @S
  116. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Let’s develop the whole Azov coastline, we can make more money. Blowing up the Kerch bridge would make the it more valuable, so go for it. A bit more video-driven enthusiasm and you could go all the way to Kremlin.

    We know, we know, it is super hot in Phoenix and AC is expensive because of “Putin”. Why don’t you try some ice? Are they out already?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  117. AP says:
    @Wokechoke

    Decent likelihood that Russia has reached exhaustion now. If Ukraine has too, there won’t be much change, but I suspect it has not. But we’ll see.

  118. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    I would have left Mariupol just as it was. I never was convinced that the Russian remodeling job slated for Mariupol was a very good idea. Have the Russians rebuilt anything there yet, or are they stuck still trying to get water and electricity to all corners of the city? You promised me a beautiful luxury condo, right on the pristine beach, after all – still waiting?….

    Mariupol after Russia’s “special operation”…doesn’t look very “special” to me??…..

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @siberiancat
  119. Matra says:
    @S

    The term ‘this weather’ is used the way you describe throughout Northern Ireland, including by those Ulster-Scots whose ancestors did not speak Gaelic, or at least not the Irish form of Gaelic. I think some Glaswegians also use it that way, or used to, but that might’ve been due to so many having parents or grandparents from Ireland.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @S
  120. AP says:
    @Yevardian

    I was curious if perhaps it had many Magyar loanwords, since it was under Hungarian rule for even longer than about a 3rd of Romanians

    When I was in Budapest I was amused to see (from the no dogs allowed sign) that the Hungarian word for dog is something like kutyo. Kutyonik is an щдвб informal Russian diminiutive word for puppy.

  121. songbird says:
    @AnonfromTN

    On the whole, Spanish is a pretty easy language, but it intimidates non-Romance Central and Eastern Europeans, due to lack of exposure. They tend to encounter the language late as adults, and not in school.

    Germans have an expression equivalent to “It’s all Greek to me” but with Spanish. Though, it is occasionally taught in their schools now.

  122. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    …still waiting

    Even Rome wasn’t built in one day. What’s the rush? Be patient, remaking the world takes time. Are Mestizos climbing in through your garbage chute? Once done, we will take your downpayment – but not in “\$’s”, start collecting something with intrinsic value.

    I have been Google mapping that Kherson place, beautiful, river, beaches, the people look fit, four seasons, wheat fields within walking distance. No wonder Zelko is pooping in his pants for losing it. That battalion that got wiped out in Mariupol would come handy now. But I hear they are recruiting volunteers all the way in New Zealand, so it will be a cake walk to take it back. Any day now, right?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Mr. Hack
  123. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    An assault on Kherson by the Ukies would have to be frontal and the flanks are protected by Water. The 6-10 Russian Batallions in Kherson should be able to hold it. Even if the bridge is blown they could resuply by ferry and other one way launched routes. They can’t be surrounded easily!

  124. @songbird

    They tend to encounter the language late as adults, and not in school.

    You may be right. I first encountered Spanish when I moved to AZ in 1995: for about half of the population there Spanish is a mother tongue. At high school graduation they even have two commencement speeches, one in English and one in Spanish. Now I know maybe a couple of hundred words (mostly school-appropriate). I learned English in school (i.e., what was considered English in the USSR: slightly old-fashioned British English).

  125. Wokechoke says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Didn’t see it. Will recheck.

    I suspect there’s a modus vivendi on the bridges. Soldiers don’t like to drop spans of Bridges they hope to otherwise capture later on. The Emperor was always Pontifex Maximus instead of Pontifragus Maximus.

  126. S says:
    @Matra

    The term ‘this weather’ is used the way you describe throughout Northern Ireland, including by those Ulster-Scots whose ancestors did not speak Gaelic, or at least not the Irish form of Gaelic. I think some Glaswegians also use it that way, or used to, but that might’ve been due to so many having parents or grandparents from Ireland.

    That is quite interesting.

    The US Civil War era diary writer, Eliza Francis Andrews, who used the term ‘this weather’ that I came across was a very upper echelon Georgian with a family sirname of Andrews (her father was one of the self-described ‘privileged 4000’ who had ruled over the US South thru that time). The name Andrews, of course, has its origins in Scotland. Her family may well have had an Ulster-Scots background, though I’m not certain.

    The Irishman whom I’d come across using the term a few years ago, I’d presumed lived in the Republic, though I’m not certain of that. I know he was in Ireland.

    The diary writer Andrews published her Civil War era diary in 1908. She commented then that the English language had changed already subtly in the South since the war’s 1865 conclusion. She also commented that during the time of the war itself, that, rather than take any offense, most Southerners had thought it rather hip to be called ‘Rebels’.

    https://archive.org/details/wartimejournalof00andr

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrews_(surname)

    • Thanks: Matra
  127. @songbird

    I think it might be even worse than “The Da Vinci Code.”

    Ouch. That is brutal!

    • Replies: @songbird
  128. Dmitry says:

    Western sanctions against Russia this year have been weak and overhyped by media and European politicians, according to a typical view.

    For a lot of the elite, sanctions will be more “expensive and inconvenient” than threatening to life, although for the tiny circles of people who have been directly sanctioned it could be scary e.g. from his public comments Medvedev is sounding permanently angry nowadays as his son has lost his American visa.

    In acute macroeconomics, American bank JP Morgan predicts GDP fall in Russia across 2022, of 3,5%, “much less than expected”. (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/jpmorgan-says-russias-economy-doing-142700692.html).

    Acute problems for normal people there has significantly been inflation in shops, which was already beyond high end of last year due to global supply crisis (and above target inflation for the last several years). In chronic view, the sanctions, will potentially contribute to accelerating existing problems in the economy next decade, of dependence on commodity exports, decline of future industries, increasing price of imports in certain categories for consumers and businesses, etc.

    Also current “weaker macroeconomic effects of sanctions”, is in context of 10-year record high oil prices, partly increased by the war in Ukraine. So, Russia’s economy is having -3,5% recession, by comparison oil exporting colleagues this year are becoming wealthy .

    So, recession, in the context of the booming economy of “performance bonus” for oil exporting colleagues, who are opening champagne and ordering a Porsche Taycan.

    IMF: Overall Saudi GDP Projected to Grow 7.6% in 2022
    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has highlighted solid indicators for the Saudi economy, expecting a 7.6 percent overall GDP growth in 2022. https://english.aawsat.com/home/article/3719926/imf-overall-saudi-gdp-projected-grow-76

    UAE records 8.2 percent growth in GDP led by higher oil production
    According to a report by the country’s central bank, the UAE produced an average of 2.95 million oil barrels per day – greatly contributing to the GDP rise. The regulator anticipates a further rise in overall real GDP in 2022 and 2023 by 5.4 percent and 4.2 percent, respectively.”

    Secret of success: Azerbaijan’s growing economy amid global recession
    Over six months of 2022, the Azerbaijani economy grew by 6.2 percent, non-oil economy – by 9.6 percent, total industrial production in industry – by 2.1 percent, and non-oil industry – by 11.5 percent.https://en.trend.az/azerbaijan/business/3623496.html

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
  129. @songbird

    Hey, if Mormons can be convinced to spend ungodly amounts of time on genealogical research just to posthumously baptize the dead then why should your scheme for Sweden be implausible? Sadly, it will probably never be realized, but is a great example of the neat things we could do with different civilizational priorities!

    • Agree: songbird
  130. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Why aren’t there any women in the pro-Russia rally in Kherson? Could it be because the demonstrators are really dressed up Russian soldiers made to look like civilians? Flying in their wives would be quite impractical, even for the kremlin organizers. 🙂

    • Replies: @Beckow
  131. Wokechoke says:

    Zelenskyy reminds me of Sasha Baron Cohen. Ukies got nigkiked.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  132. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    …Why aren’t there any women in the pro-Russia rally in Kherson?

    Yeah, that’s a bummer. In Europe a reliable place to pick up excitable babes is at green rallies: mention how windmills can kill birds and they will eat out of your hand – the tragic dilemma gets their hormones going. I don’t know about in US, but maybe try the pro-abortion demos? That could be a twofer.

    • LOL: Yevardian
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  133. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    As a result of the sanctions, Russia will necessarily have to be more dependent on Iran, not from love, but from mutual isolation, although some non-sanctioned economies (China, India) will be more important.

    In our local forum, I wonder how A123 (and in real world, how Trump fans and Fox News) can reconcile a potential increased relations of Russia and Iran.

    Trump’s main external policy as American President, was to be anti-Iran. It was only serious objective he has, in terms of external policy. Trump talked rhetorically about China and other topics, but it was more limited to words, where against Iran Trump has been very aggressive with policies and military operations.

    At the same time, Trump was rhetorically friendly to Russia. After Trump has exited power, in the opposition role, Fox News and Trump fans became even increasingly aligned to Kremlin points of view (partly as a way to oppose Biden). But to continue their alignment with Kremlin views, you would have hide any increasing relationship of Russia and Iran from the Fox News viewers, as isolating Iran was almost the only consistent external policy Trump was following with his four years of power.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @A123
  134. S says:
    @songbird

    (I want Swedish gibs!)

    Yes, don’t we all! Hehe.

    I say it as a bit of a joke. But I would like the Swedes to digitize and make freely available some of these hard-to-find, new or old Irish history books, journals, and maps.

    It wouldn’t be a bad thing if they did. Once they get themselves sorted out, that could be their gift to Europe.

    But, incidentally, I was recently surprised to learn that the term “Bronx cheer” is older than I thought it was. (at least pre-WW2.)

    I can believe that. Maybe as old as the 1920’s, but, I’m not sure.

    I had not heard of “The Whole Dam Family” before. It is curiously a bit vulgar, outside of my conception of the time. (Especially the song)

    Yeah, I was a little surprised, too, about that. It seemed a bit more risqué for the time than I would of expected.

    When I was looking up that video, I ran into silent star Harold Lloyd’s home movies. [See under ‘More’] The very first one, about 1938, Lloyd’s whole family is together with the inlaws, and right off the bat Lloyd gives a speech about ‘the whole dam family is together’. One of the in-laws pipes up, too, along the same lines

    So, apparently, it was quite a well known meme for many years.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @songbird
  135. Beckow says:
    @Wokechoke

    It is the same type, but Zelko is very short and knows that piano trick that we better not mention too much.

    An assault on Kherson by the Ukies would have to be frontal

    Right. I visualize thousands of Ukies screaming “hurrah” as they ford a shallow river and ruthlessly bayonet the retreating Moskali (did I get that right, or is it Orcs now?) Women in flowing vyshivanka skirts come out to greet them and BBC melts with too much emotion. Then Truss flies in to pin a few medals, ride a tank, and threaten Russians.

    This could be good, Sasha Cohen can do a movie and play Zelko…

    • LOL: Mikhail
  136. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    Turkey and Germany are NATO members, so they have most of the advantages of protection of nuclear weapons (Mutually Assured Destruction for their enemies) against non-NATO members, without the costs,

    Advantages for independent development of nuclear weapons, would be likely if they believe they were in danger by another NATO state, or if they disbelieve NATO would really protect them to the extent of mutual destruction. Former is possible only with Greece for Turkey (and Greece doesn’t have independent nuclear weapons), but not likely for Germany.

    On the other hand, perhaps Japan has more significant motivation to build nuclear weapons as it is not NATO, although it would depend inversely how much they can believe that “Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security between the United States and Japan”, would include nuclear protection. There are perhaps some degree of the secret agreements about nuclear weapons between Japan and USA, Abe’s plans in the final section of the Wikipedia article maybe implies Japan is not so protected. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._nuclear_weapons_in_Japan#Subsequent_developments

    • Replies: @German_reader
  137. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    In our local forum, I wonder how A123 (and in real world, how Trump fans and Fox News) can reconcile a potential increased relations of Russia and Iran.

    Yes, I was specifically wondering about that, which is why I commented.

    Trump’s main external policy as American President, was to be anti-Iran. It was only serious objective he has, in terms of external policy. Trump talked rhetorically about China and other topics, but it was more limited to words, where against Iran Trump has been very aggressive with policies and military operations.

    He did place a lot of tariffs on China and brought some jobs back from there.

    He killed an Iranian general but didn’t escalate into a full ware with Iran.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  138. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Do you have enough sense to leave the wife and kids at home when you’re checking out “excitable babes”?
    Beckow on the prowl looking to satisfy his own “excitable hormones”, in his company car (no gas costs). 🙂

    • Replies: @Beckow
  139. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Wokechoke

    Circa 1970s, a company by the name of Solido made excellent die cast replicas of military vehicles. The T34 as i recall was only available with German markings – the Nazis did utilize captured T34s.

  140. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AnonfromTN

    From personal experience I can say that if you know two or more Slavic languages, you can understand virtually all of them, if spoken slowly or written.

    Someone I knew spoke fluent Russian and Polish (as well as English and German) and said likewise.

  141. Mikhail says: • Website

    Bigoted Scum

    Re: https://www.rt.com/sport/559027-coe-russian-athletes-banned/

    Sebastian Coe competed at the 1980 Moscow Summer Olympics during the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. Back then, he noted that the 1978 FIFA World Cup was held in Argentina, where thousands had politically disappeared.

    As for the present bigotry against Russians –

    In the not too distant past, US and Israeli athletes were never penalized when their respective nation killed many civilians in a foreign land.

    The carnage in Yemen is greater than the one in Ukraine. The former involves Anglo-American and Saudi complicity.

    The Wimbledon wipes allowed for White South Africans to compete during the apartheid era.

    The Kiev regime is a corrupt, undemocratic and neo-Nazi influenced entity with blood on its hands.

    So much for Western establishment arrogance, ignorance, hypocrisy and bigotry.

    Russian athletes should be competing under the Russian flag and anthem. The likes of Coe should be banned.

  142. LondonBob says:

    Fair number of sanctions rescinded this week, even some obscure stuff, many not connected to grain shipments. Jim Rogers talking about a possible peace deal in a few weeks. Of course the neocons will do their best to oppose but I think it is fair to say the peace Party is gaining strength, and will continue to do so.

  143. songbird says:
    @Barbarossa

    Nothing is more blackpilling than attempting to read modern, bestselling novels.

    I could well believe that average IQs have fallen 20 points since Victorian times, just by comparing works from that time to modern, popular novels. Rudyard Kipling or Robert Louis Stevenson to Dan Brown and Max Brooks.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  144. songbird says:
    @S

    Lloyd is my favorite silent movie star.

    I wonder how many people would pick up on the fact that there was something odd about one of his hands, without being told.

    It is a tragedy what happened with his film vault and many others. A pity that they didn’t earlier adopt non-combustible film. Would have saved a lot of interesting history.

    • Replies: @A123
    , @S
  145. @German_reader

    The patience your country has with the Polish government is truly angelic. I suppose a big factor contributing to that patience is that despite delusional howls of “Polska Stronk” it was, and remains, a pretty weak country. Easier to ignore those that bark at you when you know they will never be a serious threat.

    You’re really underselling your point about the German re-export of gas to Poland. Germany gets that gas at 30-40% of the prevailing market price thanks to long-term contracts whereas Poland would have to buy it on the spot price since they unilaterally terminated their contract with Russia for optics reasons (and then still buys Russian gas, but from Germany).

    I think it was Dmitry who said that Poland suffered greatly thanks to being next to Germany for many centuries but in the 21st century it has paradoxically flipped completely. You’re now making them better than they would be on their own.

  146. German_reader says:
    @Dmitry

    Turkey and Germany are NATO members, so they have most of the advantages of protection of nuclear weapons (Mutually Assured Destruction for their enemies) against non-NATO members, without the costs,

    Turkey has great power ambitions of its own, its NATO membership is pretty fake by now and based not least on the fear that they could do even more damage if thrown out of NATO. Given their ominous threats towards Greece, implying that they might grab even major inhabited islands like Rhodes, I think a scenario where a nuclear-armed Turkey is openly antagonistic towards Europe is possible (though maybe not likely).

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    , @Dmitry
  147. German_reader says:
    @AP

    He killed an Iranian general but didn’t escalate into a full ware with Iran.

    He tore up the nuclear agreement that Iran was complying with, with the result that Iran is now closer than ever to building nuclear weapons, and firmly aligned with Russia and China.
    You can thank him for the drones Iran is now allegedly selling to Russia, for use in Ukraine.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @A123
  148. @S

    I’ve noted it in the past but it bears repeating that Swedish mainstream parties have re-oriented our migration policies. Adjusted for population, Sweden now gets fewer refugees per capita than we have for several decades. The ruling left-wing government is now talking about tightening for work-related migration and the right-wing opposition is talking about cutting refugee migration completely.

    A big reason why the right-wing populists haven’t grown more in Sweden is because the mainstream parties have silently been shifting closer to their positions.

    Moreover, the latest developments in Italy likely mean that their next PM could be from the far-right. I think Europe is going to diverge from the US in terms of immigration attitudes, since we don’t have two giant oceans filtering out the rabble the way they do. Moreover, the low-born they get are culturally assimilable Latinx in addition to not being crime-prone (as Ron Unz himself has proved without a shadow of a doubt). Neither of those factors can be said to be true for Syrians, Afghans etc.

    [MORE]

    One should add that I don’t even believe in ethnic nationalism, but there is a widening consensus in Sweden that our past migration policy was wrong. It’s possible to have high migration, but it should be on the lines of Australia. Given Europe’s terrible neighborhood, and fragile geography, such a policy is unlikely.

    So the walls will simply have to slowly go up in the absence of any other realistic alternative. As is usual for Europe, such a shift will have many false dawns, haphazard fits and starts and meandering policy shifts before we finally get to our final destination.

  149. @German_reader

    Turkey has great power ambitions of its own, its NATO membership is pretty fake by now and based not least on the fear that they could do even more damage if thrown out of NATO.

    Turkey’s main function in NATO is to help the US/Israel in destroying Syria and be a balancing player in the broader MENA region. Their utility against Russia is potentially significant but they have shown themselves in this crisis to be largely unwilling to play that role, often double-dealing with Moscow simulataneously.

    NATO shouldn’t be understood as a defence of Europe but rather as an American project and the US has global ambitions. Before this war, a lot of talk was given about “integrating NATO with the Indo-Pacific”. Seen in that light, Turkey’s role in the defense of Europe may be minimal but that was never a true disqualifier. (Another argument for replacing NATO long-term, I’d say).

    Given their ominous threats towards Greece, implying that they might grab even major inhabited islands like Rhodes, I think a scenario where a nuclear-armed Turkey is openly antagonistic towards Europe is possible (though maybe not likely).

    Greece only joined the EU in 1980 if memory serves, well after the Cypriot invasion. Something like that wouldn’t be possible today since it would be an attack on the entire EU. Folks often forget that the EU has a common defense clause as well. And yes, I know that both were part of NATO but the key players in the EU are Germany and France. Last time there was a flare-up between the two, France sent significant tonnage out of its fleet to send a message. There won’t be lackadaisical tolerance this time around.

    Turkey is still extremely dependent on Europe: >50% of their exports, >65% of their FDI, once you adjust for tax-haven rerouting. Europe has a lot more leverage against Turkey than it employs. A full trade and investment blockade would turn them into Venezuela pretty quickly, unironically.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  150. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Hey, buddy, I was just trying to help you since you complained about no women at the rallies. And the Ukie women are slightly better looking than that picture you posted, give them some credit, have some pride…

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  151. German_reader says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Turkey’s main function in NATO is to help the US/Israel in destroying Syria and be a balancing player in the broader MENA region.

    There’s probably some truth in this, but the Turks have goals and agency of their own. Keeping the Kurds down isn’t necessarily in Israel’s or the American interest (iirc Israel has cultivated significant links with the Kurds, they’re potentially useful to undermine Syria, Iraq and Iran after all).
    Erdogan seems to have toned down his role as patron of Islamist movements somewhat in recent years, but in the early 2010s (Gaza flotilla, support for the Muslim brothers in Egypt) the potential for a serious clash with US/Israeli interests was pretty strong imo.

    Greece only joined the EU in 1980 if memory serves, well after the Cypriot invasion.

    Greece was in NATO though, and temporarily even withdrew from NATO’s military command because of the non-reaction to Turkey’s invasion of Cyprus.
    I doubt there’d be a unified EU response if Turkey made serious moves against the Greek islands. Presumably France would aid Greece (they’ve got a bilateral defense treaty after all, which is clearly directed against Turkey), but the German reaction would probably be weak and equivocal like in 2020, constrained not least by the Turkish diaspora in Germany. The Central Eastern Europeans presumably wouldn’t care at all.
    But you’re probably right that such a scenario isn’t that likely. Even Erdogan may not be mad enough for it.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  152. @songbird

    That is precisely why I read almost no new fiction. It is so dumb. The shift is really noticeable in journalism too. H. L. Menken is one of my favorites and his vocabulary is quite extensive. While he was criticized somewhat for it back in his own day it is completely impossible to imagine it even being published today.

    I’m tempted to say that the dumbing down is because of mass marketing appealing to a larger, dumber audience, but I don’t really think this is entirely the case. There were always reams of dumb “pulp fiction” but even at the higher echelons today there is a lack of quality. And that doesn’t even get into the terrible excesses of conceptual wankery in modern literature. I’m amazed that people can be brainwashed into feigning enthusiasm for such tiresome stuff!

  153. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Speaking of “pride”, you’re not possibly gay are you? Cruising around at night in your car (even if you don’t have to pay for the gas) can be an awfully lonely thing, and quite dangerous too. Be careful, friend. You never know who you’ll end up with?…

    • Replies: @Beckow
  154. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    …Even Erdogan may not be mad enough for it.

    Why mad? He is a Turkish nationalist (of a religious kind) who pursues Turkish interests. He can be reckless, but so are the European leaders. He is not ‘madder’ than Johnson, Macron or previously Sarkozy or Blair. And less mad than frau Baerbock.

    Turkey is an example of a country that was once a solid part of the Western power block and is now an independent player. The internal contradictions simply became too big: in-and-out of EU at the same time – until it was clear that it will be ‘out’, religion-Israel, economic interests. Turkey’s journey in some ways resembles what is happening with Russia and others. The Western ability to over-promise in order to control has limits. Plus in 2016, Washington tried to remove (and kill) Erdogan, he took it personally.

    Central Europe cares a lot about the potential expansion of Turkey – we have bad memories. The problem is the two-faced Western behavior that effectively wants to mollify Turkey by throwing them some local flesh – they probably won’t do it with Greece, but don’t care as much for the rest.

    Soon Germany will be have an unstoppable internal Turkish block that will drive the policy. Berlin may force to us build Ottoman memorials, they were after all only ahead of their time.

  155. @AP

    Ukrainian is of the Soviet kind was remarkably different then what we spoke at home, and learned in Ukrainian school.

    You tend to view everything very negatively, but in truth the reform of Ukrainian orthography was implemented in order to get rid of archaic elements, not to make it any closer to Russian.

    The preceding reform of the Russian orthography was a lot more substantial. For example, a number of letters were removed from the alphabet – the letter ѣ was conflated with е, ѳ with ф, and і and ѵ with и.

    This made learning the language easier, and the same reason was there for the Ukrainian reform.

    You apparently speak some archaic version of the language, or maybe a particular dialect, however nobody in Ukraine actually uses the hard letter g, and removal of it doesn’t make Ukrainian any closer to Russian.

    You, Ukrainian quasi-Nazi degenerates, are hilarious.

    During the time of such a massive and aggressive Ukrainization campaign everything was done to separate the Ukrainians from the Russians. Even that spelling reform was intended to unite Ukrainian dialects and to strengthen the Ukrainian language.

    But in your view even the land which was gifted to Ukraine was somehow not a gift, but a debt.

    Polish influence on Ukrainian wouldn’t necessary make Ukrainian further from Sanskrit as it does from Old East Slavic.

    According to W.R. Rishi, a prominent linguist, aside from Persian the Russian language is the closest to Sanskrit.

    India & Russia: Linguistic & Cultural Affinity
    https://vedic.su/Vedic/tur/IndiaRussia_Rishi_OCR.pdf

    As will be explained in this chapter, the relation between these two languages is very close and correspondence between these two languages is so minute that, to use Dr. Sidheshwar Varma’s words, it cannot be a mere chance. The facts unfolded in this chapter are compulsory enough to lead us to conclude that during some period of history, the speakers of Sanskrit and Russian have lived close together.

    Moreover, as explained in the succeeding paragraphs of this chapter many of the grammatical rules are common to both these languages and the number of words common to these two languages formed after the application of such common grammar rules could be further multiplied. This is not so when we compare Sanskrit with any other language belonging to the Indo-European group, leaving aside Iranian and Persian.

    Also, the ancient religion of the Slavic tribes was Sun worship, and the orange-red glow, seen around the Sun during sunrise and sunset is called заря.

    The name of the Sun god in the Vedas is Surya. This god is most venerated in the northern part of the country, where supposedly the Aryans had migrated.

    Novgorod Psalter of the late 13th century contains a miniature depicting two women. One of them, fiery red, signed as “morning zora”, holds a red sun in her right hand in the form of a ring, and in her left hand she holds a torch resting on her shoulder, ending in a box from which emerges a light green stripe passing into dark green. This stripe ends in another woman’s right hand, in green, signed as “evening zora”, with a bird emerging from her left sleeve.

    A very similar motif was found in a cave temple from the 2nd or 3rd century AD in Nashik, India. The bas-relief depicts two women: one using a torch to light the circle of the Sun, and the other expecting it at sunset. Some other bas-reliefs depict two goddesses of the dawn, Ushas and Pratyusha, and the Sun, accompanied by Dawns, appears in several hymns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zorya

    This confirms, that ancient Slavic tribes were in a very close relationship with the Aryans.

    And then came the Varangians, and brought their idolatry, and then they went crazy and converted to Christianity, and destroyed everything.

    The Russians, Ukrainians and Poles could be one people, practicing Vedic religion.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @AP
  156. Jazman says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Everything is possible on twitter , where majority of Ukie victories happen

  157. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    You are reaching, I must have gotten to you 🙂 Calm down, I am a family man, and unlike you I have progeny so my future is safe. Check out those demos, it attracts interesting people, but you need to get out of your car. That is, by the way, my advise in general, there is a lot of life out there when you step out of the metal box.

  158. Mr. Hack says:
    @Barbarossa

    There were always reams of dumb “pulp fiction”

    I hope that you’re insinuating that there was some really good pulp fiction back in the day too? I never read much of any of this fare, and my own adolescent adventures in reading were limited to mostly mysteries that I would take out at the library and comic books. Comic books, were the bane of my youth. It all started so innocently, where my older sister started me down this road of infamy with me reading her “Millie the Model” and “Archie Comic books, When she saw that I enjoyed these innocent and fun creations, she wisely moved me on to “Classic Illustrated Comic Books” that did a good job of reinterpreting great world literature into a comic book format. Books by all of the great authors: Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stephenson, Dumas, Shakespeare, Jack London,even Julius Caesar, etc. Then I moved on to the super hero variety on my own…and well, that’s another story.

    But I never got into “pulp fiction”. Comic books had thoroughly supplantd them by the time I became of reading age (which was pretty young, probably by the time I was 6 years old). Anyway, I’ve since looked at a couple of original ones in old dusty bookstores, and have to admit that some of them look quite interesting. I think that more than a few great authors started their careers writing this kind of stuff before they went on to more advanced novels (H.P. Lovecraft, Dashiel Hammett, Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov). Have you read any of these pulp fiction books? They look quite interesting, I’ve acquired one small book filled with pulp fiction cover art, that provides some fantastic examples of the type of stories found within this genre:

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  159. @songbird

    For me, being a native Russian speaker, both the grammar and more importantly the phonetics of Spanish are easier to understand, and easier to practically use.

    The grammar is less alien than English, the pronunciation is the most natural transition from Russian, no special effort is needed.

    They also have a great musical and literary tradition, whereas anything we used to love about the American and British culture is disappearing rapidly.

  160. Jazman says:
    @Mr. Hack

    The battle for Mariupol was one of the most successful urban operations of the past 30 years. For the Ukrainian command to surrender Mariupol is a disgrace. The Ukrainian fighters held out to the last man and surrendered only when there was no way out, the blame for the fall of Mariupol rests entirely on the shoulders of the military leadership. For the Russians, Mariupol was a heroic feat. Without numerical superiority and air power, it took just three months to defeat the enemy’s elite units in a dense, multi-story post-Soviet urban area. The soldiers are heroes, the command – well done. And no propaganda howl can drown that out. You are full of BS as usual

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AnonfromTN
  161. Beckow says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    AP tends to view everything very negatively

    That’s becoming a Western disease. The American culture simultaneously preaches a black-and-white picture of the world and also pushes simplicity that impoverishes thinking. AP is a typical victim of this, but it is endemic and has lately spread to the American vassal states – they cannot handle complex ideas or even understand what having a context means. Everything is politicised, “Hitler” lurks around every corner and the dreaded “reds” are under every bed.

    They lost it. Look around, they can’t even describe reality any more: from 50 genders, Greta green hysteria, Trump-the-devil, the ‘glorious’ victory in Ukraine. They can only live now in a world they control, they hate unpleasant realities, they can’t fathom that others are like them but have different views.

    ancient Slavic tribes were in a very close relationship with the Aryans.

    The DNA evidence also shows it. This is a very uncomfortable for the Western view of the past and of themselves – it introduces a strong element of otherness into Europe. What makes it worse is that the otherness is largely based on what the West has often claimed as its own: ‘Aryan’ or core Indo-European…it drives them crazy and they try to suppress it before it is too late. I think it is already too late.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  162. @AnonfromTN

    I looked the other day at what languages RFE/Svoboda broadcast in – can you believe they actually do it in Montenegrin, LOL? So of course they do it in “Ukrainian”, and Belorossiyan, Gruzian etc. But it gets worse – they do Romanian , but not Molodovan. Although Moldova has a state and identity much older than many well known countries, a true believer in all this is generally thought as a true-soviet, as the states recreation was a Soviet one, which is viewed as “pro-Russian” view – and in addition plenty of Romanians and Moldovans think they are one of the same , Bessarabia was part of Kingdom of Romania etc ( that’s NATO member with Black Sea coastline, Romania)

    Tatar, Bashkir and Chechen of course are broadcast in…as is “troublemaker” Hungarian – but NATO prostitute Poland and the aparthied Estonia and Latvia don’t have any broadcasts in their language.

    So broadcasting in Montenegrin and Serbian, Romanian but NOT Moldovan ( both examples being basically identical languages), Hungarian but not Estonian……..these suggest the enemy has and also did use language as a weapon, a weapon used to undermine their affinity for or shared heritage with Russia.

    Sure RFE/Svoboda is an irrelevance in Russia, only for khomyak freaks mostly – but it has a huge effect both direct and indirect among “elites” in all these other countries, and a whole generation of prospective journalists in post-soviet world who had very positive view of myth of “free journalism of the United States” – which means they will say and do any sh*t now

  163. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    This is a very uncomfortable for the Western view of the past and of themselves – it introduces a strong element of otherness into Europe.

    I don’t understand your reasoning here at all…why would the connections between ancient Slavs and ancient Iranians be a problem for Westerners?
    To the extent that Slavic peoples have been otherized by Westerners (well, mostly Germans, maybe Italians too, but I don’t know enough about that) via racial theories it’s more about real or alleged Asiatic admixture in Slavs…Slavs as Huns.
    Where do you get all these ideas about what’s supposedly going on in the minds of Westerners?

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  164. Mr. Hack says:
    @Jazman

    Congratulations! Your guys won. Now, you can apply for first dib bids for a “luxury condo in the garden by the sea” that comrade Beckow is working on. The only problem is, that he’s not disclosed the timeline of this project?…..

    • Replies: @Jazman
    , @Wokechoke
  165. Mr. Hack says:
    @German_reader

    Beckow is a traveling salesman. He’ll try to sell anything to anybody.


    Beckow trying to float another one of his brilliant ideas – “buyer beware”. 🙂

  166. Jazman says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Do not worry look at Ukraine it is 25 years behind the most underdeveloped areas in Russia and Mariopol in 5 years will be great city
    Ukraine will cease to exist as a result.Well,maybe a single province will remain to take the burden of Ukrainian government debt.

    • Disagree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mr. Hack
  167. @German_reader

    What he is saying and you do not understand is that it is the Slavic peoples that have a real connection to the indigenous Aryans, and you the Germans had nothing to do with it when you were speculating about the Aryan race and all that.

    And now, considering that a lot of people still believe in your theories, it might be extremely inconvenient to eventually find out, that the inferior Slavic race is exactly the one they are supposed to hold in high regard.

    Yet it looks like in reality you do understand what he is saying, but immediately are trying to discredit his argument by denigrating the Aryans — all of a sudden, they are not the originators of the white race anymore, they are Asiatic.

    So, for your information.

    The Aryans are from the Sintashta culture, located in the south of the Ural mountains. They are not Asiatic and not ancient Persians. They belong to the R1a haplogroup, the same as most of the Russians and Poles do.

    Most of the northern Slavic peoples, to be presice.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  168. @Barbarossa

    In order to write good books you have to first read a large number of good books. We have prodigy mathematicians, chess players, basketball players, computer programmers even but you are going to have to ponder long to think of a single (non-poet) prodigy writer. Almost nobody will do this. Why should they do it when you can make Harry Potter garbage and make money?

    The best fiction writer today is Neal Stephenson. Even him you are going to have to skim a lot of dreck to get to the end of his books. There is a line in Cryptonomicon:

    it was a long tale not worth telling

    That’s about 40% of all his books. The 60% is well worth it though.

    Did you make it to the end of Upstate Cauldron? Did you find out about any places you want to make a day trip to check it out?

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @Yevardian
  169. AP says:
    @German_reader

    Correct. He has a mixed record. Though I think that Iran and Russia would have been close regardless, they are natural allies.

    My point is that he wasn’t as anti-Iran or as soft on China as had been presented.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  170. German_reader says:

    Rainbow flag flying over the Bundestag today for Christopher Street Day:

    Grotesque, more humiliating than the Red flag.
    I wonder if there’s a real risk monkeypox will become airborne…but even if it did, there probably wouldn’t be repercussions for the sacred homos.

  171. German_reader says:
    @AP

    Though I think that Iran and Russia would have been close regardless, they are natural allies.

    I don’t see why they would be, apart from common opposition to US hegemony.
    Russian-Persian relations weren’t especially harmonious, both the Tsarist empire and the Soviet Union waged wars against Persia or occupied parts of it. The Soviet Union was the Lesser Satan for Khomeini. There isn’t a deep history of friendly relations here like with some other countries like Syria. Also seems doubtful to me that Russia has much genuine interest in Iran becoming a nuclear-armed state, under other conditions they’d be rivals for influence in Central Asia.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  172. AP says:
    @Jazman

    Do not worry look at Ukraine it is 25 years behind the most underdeveloped areas in Russia

    Nonsense, and only someone who has not been there would write that.

    While Ukraine overall is poorer than Russia, and no part of Ukraine comes close to Moscow or Peter in wealth or development, there is overlap. Kiev and its environs are much more developed than much of rural or provincial Russia, Lviv is a gem, etc.

    • Replies: @Jazman
  173. German_reader says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Yet it looks like in reality you do understand what he is saying, but immediately are trying to discredit his argument by denigrating the Aryans — all of a sudden, they are not the originators of the white race anymore, they are Asiatic.

    No, I was referring to Huns as Asiatic (in the sense of Mongols or the original Turks). To the extent there’s Western racism against Slavs and more specifically against Russians it’s based on the perception that you’ve become bastardized with various Asiatic peoples. Scratch a Russian and you will find a Tartar. Nothing to do with the ancient Iranians (I know they weren’t Mongol-like or like modern Persians who are a mixture between Indo-Europeans and the pre-existing population).

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  174. @Jazman

    blame for the fall of Mariupol rests entirely on the shoulders of the military leadership

    There are no bad soldiers, only bad generals.
    Napoleon Bonaparte.

  175. @German_reader

    Ha ha your country is fake and gay.

    At least you guys have an excellent sheep dog.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  176. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    …why would the connections between ancient Slavs and ancient Iranians be a problem for Westerners?

    The worldview in the West has been that they are the primary IE people, in the past referred to as ‘Aryan’, lately not so much. The Slavs are a later arrivals from the north-east forests (or even better, Pripyat marshes 🙂 ) who were a provincial offshoot of the early IE civilizations but are corrupted by the Asiatic admixtures. This was the primary view in Germany-Austria. It was also the English and French view that spread to America. The rivalry with Germany made that view less aggressive.

    A typical feature of this view was the glorification of ‘Vikings‘ whose shallow footprints were celebrated as ‘civilization building’. Vikings were raiders with varied origins and they hardly represented the original IE people. The very term ‘Viking’ didn’t exist at that time and was invented later. But it is only one example, the Western thought is full of similar feel-good myths.

    In recent years linguistic advances and DNA tests showed that the original IE civilization was different from the Western centric view: more eastern, mostly R1a people, and formed in the Ukraine-South Russia steppes, closer to Persian tribes. As recently as early 2000’s people were taught the Anatolian IE origin with spread NW to Europe focused on Celts, Latins (an offshoot of Celts) and Germanic tribes (Renfrew). Only grudgingly there was some reference to the ‘steppes north of the Black Sea’. It didn’t fit politically.

    Balts and Slavs were the other. Based on linguistics and DNA it is more likely that the Western part of Europe is more non-IE with larger admixtures. Politically this is very ephemeral, but it does create a world-view that is in odds with the dominant Western self-perception. Maybe the rush to embrace the swarthies and the multi-culturalization of the Western societies is a silent admission of their less-IE origins, creating a new foundation myth.

  177. @German_reader

    I don’t see why they would be, apart from common opposition to US hegemony.

    You hit the nail on the head. Normal business relations with all countries are a natural desire of any sane government (which immediately excludes the empire and all its vassals from the sane category), but friendship or alliance are a whole different ball game. Friendship/alliance of Russia with China, Iran, Venezuela, Nicaragua, etc. would never happen without a strong push by the imperial idiots. BTW, that applies to both US “parties”. As someone recently said, “it’s good when the Republicans open their mouths, that reminds us that Democrats are not the only morons in Congress”.

    Now, when the cementing of anti-imperial alliance is a done deal, the most important thing to remember is that history, like life, is irreversible.

  178. Jazman says:
    @AP

    Nonsense is what you writing I have been in Ukraine many times before 2014 , other Russian cities are way better developed not just two you mention .

    • Replies: @AP
  179. A123 says: • Website
    @AnonfromTN

    FYI, no country ever wanted to invade the US

    FYI, the U.S. never wanted to invade Iran. This is why Trump wisely refused to to bite on Khamenei’s provocations.

    In terms of current MENA region aggressiveness, everyone objective understands that Iran is the #1 funder of violence… especially via undeclared proxy conflicts. Khamenei’s ubiquitous proxy violence makes NeoConDemocrats look like amateurs.

    PEACE 😇

  180. A123 says: • Website
    @songbird

    James Doohan, Scotty from Star Trek, lost the middle finger on his right hand during WW II.

    This was successfully “shot around” during the TV series. I believe it was noticeable, but not commented on, in some of the movies.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @songbird
  181. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    As recently as early 2000’s people were taught the Anatolian IE origin with spread NW to Europe focused on Celts, Latins (an offshoot of Celts) and Germanic tribes (Renfrew). Only grudgingly there was some reference to the ‘steppes north of Black Sea’.

    I don’t know, my impression has always been that Anatolia as the IE-Urheimat was a somewhat exotic minority view which didn’t make much sense (as I understand it there’s very obvious non-IE substrate in Hittite), and that the steppe was the likely location.
    Anyway, thanks for the answer. I admit there’s something to your views, but imo you also exaggerate a lot, your grudge against Westerners is really a bit obsessive.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @A123
    , @Coconuts
  182. @Mr. Hack

    Well, it’s true that there is such a thing as good pulp, whether for it’s camp or other merits. For anything in pulp that is worthwhile there are usually reams of total garbage though. So I’m not necessarily denigrating all pulp with my critical words.

    Heck, I’ll freely own up to enjoying children’s books quite a bit, provided they are good ones. I’ll often enough browse through what my wife and kids bring home from the library, but then again my wife is quite picky in regards to quality. For every gem of a children’s book out there, there are 100 pieces of absolute dreck!

    I enjoyed plenty of comics myself as a kid. The brand new ones were more than I wanted to spend but the owner had boxes of stuff from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s that could be had for 25 or 50 cents. I have many fond memories of biking down to the lake where the comic shop was and sorting through the dusty bins in the back for 80’s Batman comics.

    There are rarely genres which are all bad (maybe romance novels?) , but a little generalizing can be a useful conceit.

  183. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader

    He tore up the nuclear agreement that Iran was complying with,

    What agreement is that?

    It is irrefutable, proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, fact the Khamenei violated the JCPOA deal while Obama was still President. The myth that Iran was “compliant” is so thoroughly debunked, no one serious could possibly believe it.

    Iran is now … firmly aligned with Russia and China.

    Iran, CCP Elites, and their MegaCorporation co-conspirators have opposed U.S. workers & citizens for some time. Their enmity significantly preceded Trump’s administration. Trump was simply the first President who reacted appropriately.

    The “Russia, Russia, Russia” myth that the DNC and Fake Stream Media created in their failed attempt to smear Trump created unnecessary problems. Christian Russia and Christian America are natural allies.

    PEACE 😇

  184. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    What you call a grudge is treating the West in the same way as it treats others, you are overly sensitive. The same goes for exaggeration, it is just streamlining – we don’t have time for academic complexity. All of us here write in a short-hand style.

    Anatolia as the IE-Urheimat was a somewhat exotic minority view

    Not if you read the pre-1990’s literature, Renfrew was considered an authority. Once it was clear that view was not sustainable, there were attempts to create a back-and-forward model that would combine the two – the spread of R1b is often explained that way, with a back and forward over the Caucasus mountains.

    I think IE originated as a mix of mostly R1a steppe people and north Caucasus mountain valley women. The hirsute gene came through the females – body hair is a Caucasus cold weather adaptation unknown previous to that. In an interesting way the Amazon myth reflects that. But maybe not, it could be a later unrelated invention.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Yevardian
  185. @Emil Nikola Richard

    The German Shepherd is a very neat dog. However almost all of them in the U.S. are messed up with distorted instincts and bad hips. I’ve heard that many that are used for law enforcement/ military can’t even be sourced from the US and must be imported.

    It seems like there is some sort of deep metaphor contained therein LOL.

    We as Americans can screw up your centuries of dog breeding and give you the homo flag. You’re welcome.

  186. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    In an interesting way the Amazon myth reflects that. But maybe not, it could be a later unrelated invention.

    I thought Amazons were most likely a reference to Scythians (impossible to be certain though).
    Your general model for the origin of IE seems plausible. I can’t really comment on the genetics, tbh my understanding of all that haplotypes stuff is very limited.

  187. @Emil Nikola Richard

    I did make it through Upstate Cauldron. It was a really fun read which was a breeze to get through. I had actually thanked you a couple threads back and given a few thoughts, but I’m guessing you missed seeing it.

    There were a number of places which I’ve been near in the past, so it was interesting to have the history in a greater context. Actually just this past week I took a drive out past Binghamton to pick up some lumber racking and drove right past the Mormon Priesthood Restoration Site.

    https://ensignpeakfoundation.org/susquehanna-river/

    It made me think of the book. I really should have stopped and checked it out but I had a 24′ trailer behind me and had found out the racking was heavy enough to require two trips. That was a 17 hour day by the time it was all torn down, loaded, and unloaded with two 5 hour round trip drives! So no time for scenic stops!

    I really enjoyed the overall tone of Upstate Cauldron as it was delivered neither from a perspective of committed belief or disbelief. The author let events speak for themselves without overlaying any particular agenda.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  188. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader

    @Beckow

    I admit there’s something to your views, but imo you also exaggerate a lot, your grudge against Westerners is really a bit obsessive

    I encounter a similar issue trying to achieve civilized discourse with Beckow. He has truly obsessive anti-America bias.

    The slightest hint that Europe may be responsible for its own predicament yields an indiscriminant anti-U.S. broadside. His EU is failing with no American influence. It is an organization that simply makes no sense.

    The EuroZone common currency has, by design, a weak central bank that makes the Fed look like a paragon of virtue and stability. I actually feel some sympathy for Legarde. She has the bad luck to be in the top sport at the ECB when the system is destined to have a crisis, possibly a fatal one.

    PEACE 😇

  189. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    You tend to view everything very negatively, but in truth the reform of Ukrainian orthography was implemented in order to get rid of archaic elements, not to make it any closer to Russian.

    The 1933 reforms seem to have streamlined into Russian, removal of “g” was a clear example. It made Ukrainian identical to the southern Russian with respect to those sounds. They also did things like change “b” to “v” for foreign words (barbarism/barbarstvo became varvarstvo, as in Russian), “t” to “f” (Skyty became Skyfy) also as in Russian.

    Ukraine was still Ukrainian-speaking in 1933, even Eastern Ukraine. If Soviets undertook this project today they would have almost certainly made Surzhik the new literary “Ukrainian” language.

    The preceding reform of the Russian orthography was a lot more substantial. For example, a number of letters were removed from the alphabet – the letter ѣ was conflated with е, ѳ with ф, and і and ѵ with и

    I don’t speak Russian well enough to comment on those changes. But I suspect that the alphabet whose users created arguably the world’s greatest prose literature probably didn’t need to be improved.

    You apparently speak some archaic version of the language,

    I speak the standard language that was used in the Ukrainian SSR until 1933 and Galicia until 1945 (they had used the identical standard). I don’t really speak the Galician dialect, my Galician ancestors weren’t villagers and they taught standard Ukrainian (but pre-1933) in the Ukrainian schools in the West. But I’ve heard Galician dialect from old people in church. I’ve seen standardized Rusyn and it looks a lot like Galician dialect.

    You, Ukrainian quasi-Nazi degenerates

    Ukrainian diaspora has far lower rates of abortion, HIV, out of wedlock births, divorce, violence, etc. than do people in the morally degenerated ex-Soviet Ukraine.

    During the time of such a massive and aggressive Ukrainization campaign everything was done to separate the Ukrainians from the Russians.

    1. This is a total myth. So-called “Ukrainianization” was merely teaching Ukrainian-speaking people in their own Ukrainian language. That is, Ukrainian villagers moved into Russian-inhabited towns and Ukrainian schools were made for them; therefore towns became more Ukrainian -speaking (it made achieving literacy much easier – learning how to read in one’s own language is a lot easier than in another language). A natural process that elsewhere resulted in, for example, German-speaking Prague becoming Czech-speaking. In the Ukrainian SSR this natural process was only allowed to happen in the 1920s, in the 1930s it was reversed. The Ukrainian language reform during which Ukrainian was streamlined into Russian occurred in the time of this reversal.

    2. The 1933 reforms on the contrary was done to bring Ukrainian closer to Russian.

    Even that spelling reform was intended to unite Ukrainian dialects and to strengthen the Ukrainian language

    The original standardized language was based on the Poltava dialect which was in the center-east. The reforms either made it closer to Russian outright, or added elements from the easternmost Ukrainian (that is, closest to Russian).

    According to W.R. Rishi, a prominent linguist, aside from Persian the Russian language is the closest to Sanskrit.

    He might not have been familiar with Ukrainian, or even Polish. But I wouldn’t doubt that Slavic languages would be a lot closer to Sanskrit than would be Germanic or Romance languages. The Indian language came from the North, their upper castes are distantly related to Slavs. Not sure about Baltic, their languages are also pretty old and they are related to Slavs.

    I could be wrong, but my understanding is that Slavs are descended from the same group who moved south and captured India; the Slavs were the ones from this group who were content to stay behind in the cool northern forests.

    Also, the ancient religion of the Slavic tribes was Sun worship, and the orange-red glow, seen around the Sun during sunrise and sunset is called заря.

    Correct. The Ukrainian neo-pagans worship Dazhboh. President Yushchenko’s wife grew up in a Ukrainian neo-pagan family.

    And then came the Varangians, and brought their idolatry, and then they went crazy and converted to Christianity, and destroyed everything.

    Christianity brought civilization to the Eastern Slavs. Instead of worshipping crude sticks they built cathedrals, schools, hospitals.

    The Russians, Ukrainians and Poles could be one people, practicing Vedic religion.

    As pagans they would not have survived in the long run, not in that part of the world; Christianization probably saved the Slavs from later Islamification at the hands of the Tatars or Turks.

    Paganism only survived in India due to huge population and geographic isolation.

    The best prospect for real union of Russians, Ukrainians and Poles was in the 16th to early 17th centuries when Poland and Ukraine were already united, the peoples of Novgorod and Pskov had made moves to join them, and when Rus princes from Ukraine and Belarus (the Orthodox Mykhailo Vyshnevetsky and the Catholic converts Lev and Ivan Sapieha) allied with some Muscovite boyars and steered the entire PLC into capturing Moscow. I’ve heard rumors that the English worked against this union, thus preventing the emergence of a Catholic Slavic superpower country.

  190. A123 says: • Website
    @Dmitry

    In our local forum, I wonder how A123 (and in real world, how Trump fans and Fox News) can reconcile a potential increased relations of Russia and Iran.

    Trump’s main external policy as American President, was to be anti-Iran. It was only serious objective he has, in terms of external policy. Trump talked rhetorically about China and other topics, but it was more limited to words, where against Iran Trump has been very aggressive with policies and military operations.

    China and Iran are allies in their hatred aimed against American workers. Defending American citizens against joint IRAN/CCP aggression is a logical and necessary position. Trump’s willingness to standup to CCP Elites was undermined by a non-MAGA Senate and a non-MAGA House.

    Iran and Russia are actually strategic foes. Khamenei’s Shia Crescent imperial plan includes displacing Russia from Syria. Almost all of their recent cooperation is merely tactical. Both must react to policies coming from the European WEF (a.k.a. ‘The West’), promulgated via the European Elite’s puppet Not-The-President Biden.

    The next MAGA administration, most likely Trump’s 2nd term, will also control the House. And, MAGA will have a much stronger hand in the Senate. This will help America move away from ‘The West’ and its embrace of Ukrainian aggression. The “Russia, Russia, Russia” myth is also over.

    Joint MAGA-Russia cooperation against ‘The West’ will help Russia move away from a key strategic foe, the expansionist Khamenei regime. Assuming Khamenei survives that long.

    PEACE 😇

  191. AP says:
    @Jazman

    You wrote: “Ukraine it is 25 years behind the most underdeveloped areas in Russia”

    Here is a shopping mall in Kharkiv before and after the Russian barbarians wrecked it:

    Here is a poor city in the Russian provinces. People from shithole places like this were looting wealthier Kiev suburbs:

    As I said, overall Ukraine is poorer than Russia, no places in Ukraine can touch Moscow or Peter in terms of wealth and development, but there is overlap and your statement “Ukraine it is 25 years behind the most underdeveloped areas in Russia” is a lie.

    • Replies: @Jazman
  192. @Barbarossa

    Excellent.

    The author let events speak for themselves without overlaying any particular agenda.

    Joscelyn Godwin has put multi-man-years-labor in translating the work of Julius Evola. He is a dangerous man!

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  193. @AP

    Paganism only survived in India due to huge population and geographic isolation.

    Man, and you made an impression of a person who knows something and only becomes clinically deluded when it comes to Ukraine! If by “paganism” you mean a non-Abrahamic religions, those dominate through the most populous continent, Asia: Buddhism in many countries, Hinduism in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, Taoism in China, Shinto in Japan. The adherents of non-Abrahamic religions are by far the majority in the two most populous countries in the world, China and India, and in many others.

    • Replies: @AP
  194. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    If by “paganism” you mean a non-Abrahamic religions, those dominate through the most populous continent, Asia: Buddhism in many countries, Hinduism in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, Taoism in China, Shinto in Japan

    India and China had huge populations, others are isolated islands. Pagan Slavs had no such advantages – populations fairly small, and had easy access to Christians and Muslims. If they had somehow avoided becoming Christians, they would have become Muslims as did the Buddhists and pagans of Central Asia.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  195. @AP

    India and China had huge populations, others are isolated islands.

    Are Myanmar, Nepal, and Thailand isolated islands? That would be a huge geographic discovery.

    As to Islam, there is an apocryphal story that Prince Vladimir considered it and rejected, because Islam prohibits alcohol.

    • Replies: @AP
  196. Wokechoke says:
    @Gerard1234

    Like I said I don’t really care how locals pronounce their place names. Bulldoze the lot and make Mumbai Bombay again.

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  197. Coconuts says:
    @German_reader

    I admit there’s something to your views, but imo you also exaggerate a lot, your grudge against Westerners is really a bit obsessive.

    I don’t know how popular Aryanism ever became in France (I think that it what Beckow is referencing with the idea that the IE originated in Northern Germany/Denmark), afaik the big French exponent of that view was Vacher de Lapouge, but he was controversial and considered too avant-garde in France itself and was more respected in Germany. These views are often linked with the idea that the aristocracy in France had been Germanic or Aryan and the other classes were inferior Celtic and Latin people, so 1789 was a kind of racial revolt (Gobineau also writes about this) but that was another minority or controversial view.

    I know that Marija Gimbutas and feminists inspired by her were popularising the Kurgan hypothesis from at least the 1970s, that’s how I first heard of it (they say that IE invasions introduced hard patriarchy into Europe and destroyed peaceful goddess religions). Recently the famous Russian cultural commentator Bronze Age Pervert has countered this by saying that it was a good thing that IE men of power destroyed these cultures dominated by tyrannical obese grandmas and their longhouses.

    • Replies: @LatW
  198. S says:
    @songbird

    Lloyd is my favorite silent movie star.

    Of the big three silent film comedians, Loyd, Chaplin, and Keaton, I’ve always thought Lloyd was the best. He was brilliant. Gotta give Fatty Arbuckle and Mabel Normand strong honorable mentions though. And Mabel, in addition to being quite funny, was a hottie!:-)

    I wonder how many people would pick up on the fact that there was something odd about one of his hands, without being told.

    Not many. Unless people have read about it, or, had been told, they wouldn’t know part of Lloyd’s hand was missing. His prosthetic was that good. How they let a live explosive get mixed in with a box of inert props beats me. Carelessness, I suppose. He was lucky the explosion didn’t outright kill him.

    It is a tragedy what happened with his film vault and many others. A pity that they didn’t earlier adopt non-combustible film. Would have saved a lot of interesting history.

    Yeah, it was. He went to a great deal of trouble to preserve those films of his, and then to have a lot of it burn up in a fire was quite a shame. Lloyd was an all around intelligent and physically healthy guy, and into extreme workouts before most even knew the value of regular simple exercise. Explains how Lloyd as an actor in his 50’s could pass himself off as an 18 year old character in one of his movies.

    If you’re not familiar with Winsor McCay, you might find his silent animated work of some interest. It’s other worldly. He was sheer genius and decades ahead of his time.

    In the years around 1910 he had a full page/full color once weekly comic strip in the United States called Little Nemo. In 1911 he created a film of Little Nemo which combined live action with the animation of the Nemo comic strip characters.

    Starting at the 8 minute mark the animation goes into full swing. [See Nemo vid under ‘More’]

    • Thanks: songbird, Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @songbird
  199. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Are Myanmar, Nepal, and Thailand isolated islands

    These are all parts of the massively populated Hindu and Chinese civilizations (Myanmar mixes those two).

    Even then, Islam managed to convert most of Indonesia and Malaysia.

  200. @Beckow

    All Scandinavian actors who have become world-famous have achieved this by playing only Russians in Hollywood films.

    WTF was the subliminal message in getting Omar Sharif to play Dr Zhivago I wonder? Or maybe its all innocent and his acting skills, charisma and success with the ladies was why he was hired? But its not like they would allow him to play Sherlock Holmes or Superman.

    Although superiority complex and prejudice is there, I think this is not aimed specifically at Slavs – but an amalgamation of Orthodox, Slavs and all Mediterraneans (except the French).
    On holiday, I have always got the impression that the bad Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian or Germanic thinks of the Portuguese, Italian, Turkish and Russian as EQUALLY inferior to them. Probably the Romanian ever more inferior and untrustworthy. I don’t think these guys think they have less chance of getting scammed at a Portuguese street market (as an example because its EU/NATO) , then they would at a Turkish market on holiday, or a Russian one ( if it was Slavic or Azeri seller they not interested). The same thing towards Italians also – I’ve heard this saying about Germans loving Italians but not respecting them – thinking of them as scammers, unreliable, corrupt and lazy would be the direction of their thinking – and for Scandinavians, a fake moral superiority over South Europeans

  201. Wokechoke says:

    I’ve still seen no offensive capabilities on the Ukie side. Not saying it cant happen but…

    I looked at the Russian Pontoon Bridge that was struck in May or April and noticed the artillery holes in in the metal. Looks amazingly similar to the holes the HIMARS made on the Kherson Bridge concrete and rebar. I suspect that the Ukies had HIMARS available a while back.

    It’s all a little shady.

    • Replies: @AP
  202. Wokechoke says:

    How do you attack a mine belt in front of a built up area with artillery behind the Dneiper and medium size rivers on each flank?

    Sandhurst graduates appear to claim to know the Answer.

  203. Coconuts says:
    @AP

    Not sure about Baltic, their languages are also pretty old and they are related to Slavs.

    I’ve read a few times that Lithuanian is the closet spoken language to PIE, which would make it the oldest living Indo-European language.

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Yevardian
  204. Mr. Hack says:

    Good news arrived today from the Kherson direction. More than 2,000 occupiers were surrounded and requeted a “green corridor” to insure their safe pasage way from this battle zone.

    This was reported by the (Russian language) publication “The Insider” , with reference to data from sources in the Armed Forces.

    “In particular, according to their data, three Russian battalion tactical groups, including a special unit company and a tank company, were invited to the “green corridor” to escape from the encirclement.

    It should be noted that this coincides with the information from the military expert Oleksandr Kovalenko, who reported earlier today that near the village of Visokopilya, in the Kherson region, the Russian occupiers got into a cauldron and are demanding the organization of a “green corridor” to escape from the encirclement of Ukrainian defenders. According to “The Insider”, the offensive of the Armed Forces of Ukraine was carried out immediately in two directions: Olgyne-Kostyrka and Potemkino-Novovoznesneske. Active fighting is currently taking place in the north of the Kherson region along the Arkhangelsk-Zolota balka line.”
    https://theins.ru/news/253432

    Looks like things really are starting to heat up in the Kherson Oblast. Imagine the gall of the Russian military hypocrites, trying to establish a green corridor for themselves, that they’ve seldom allowed to the Ukrainian civilian that fall under their control.

  205. Matra says:

    But its not like they would allow him to play Sherlock Holmes

    The next Sherlock Holmes will be darker than Omar Sharif. He’ll be black, and will probably reject being referred to as ‘he’ being non-binary and all.

    • Agree: Coconuts, S
    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  206. @German_reader

    Actually I think you’re missing the fact that this is a courageous move by Germany blatantly defying the Omnipotent GloboHomo. You’ll notice that they are flying the old style homo flag, not the one with all the extra stripes and chevrons etc.

    The fact that they are flying the retrograde homo flag is basically a reactionary Nazi provocation against all the genderdoodles and transqueers and amoebaphiliacs who have now been BRUTALLY excluded and harmed.

    I just wish for a day when all nations will be as brave a Germany has been today…

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
  207. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    I hope you are correct, but I’ve been reading that it is more like 300 trapped Russian soldiers, an understrength battalion. Even that is a good thing.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Gerard1234
  208. AP says:
    @Wokechoke

    It’s very likely that Ukraine is getting stuff before it is publicly announced. It was that way with the 200 tanks it got in spring.

  209. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    Yeah, I’ve read anywhere from 1,000 – 2,000 rushistas. I’m currently watching this interesting clip too as I reply to your comment, that reviews the whole situation and mentions that Ukrainian partisan groups are quite active in the area too:

    • Replies: @LatW
  210. German_reader says:
    @Barbarossa

    You’ll notice that they are flying the old style homo flag, not the one with all the extra stripes and chevrons etc.

    Curious oversight, but I suppose it will be fixed next year (the flag is to be flown over the Bundestag every year on Christopher Street Day, and probably also on some other occasions). The current government has a so-called Queer-Beauftragter (don’t know how to translate…commissar for queer affairs? Anyway, the guy’s a homo, has stated he’s in an open relationship and active on Grindr…) who’s ranting against TERFs on Twitter and rejecting criticism of sex conversion surgeries for teenagers with lines like “that argument could come from evangelical Christians and bourgeois fascists”. There’ll also be a new law soon which will allow people to change their legal gender and name without need for evaluation, and if you call them by their old name or make reference to their real sex, you’ll get a fine.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @songbird
  211. Jazman says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Stop attempting to pass your delusions as reality.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  212. Jazman says:
    @AP

    “Here is a shopping mall in Kharkiv before and after the Russian barbarians wrecked it”
    When you using shopping mall to hide weapons it is not shopping mall , so you lying again

    “People from shithole places like this were looting wealthier Kiev suburbs”

    These tall tales are then woven back into the main strand of the narrative: the Russian army is a disorganized mob of demoralized “orcs” whose only real talent is plundering household appliances, raping young women, and randomly gunning down old folks on the streets.
    Kiddo,i get that you try to emulate Goebbels,but i assure you,no matter how many times you repeat a lie-it won’t become truth.
    You really should choose role models more carefully.
    I was in city of Bryansk and everything is way ahead of anything comparing to Kharkov . Kiev is shithole only good thing is cheap so good place for foreigners to live . Look at public transportation in Kiev it is joke . Serbia was in war and all kind of sanctions people live better then Ukrainians before 2014 now is even worse

    • Replies: @AP
  213. @S

    I’ve actually been watching some Chaplin with the family lately. The kids really like it; I’m somewhat surprised by how much they appreciate it.

    I really enjoy silent movies from time to time and I’ll make such to check out Lloyd’s stuff.

    Thanks for the mention of Little Nemo as well. I’m a little familiar with it but I’ll add it to my list to check out in more depth. I just ordered a collection from the library. I should probably add it to my list to own as the Art Nouveau influenced artwork and the wild content seem really excellent.

    We’ve had some Tintin and Asterix and Obelix kicking around the house too which is pretty amusing.

    Sometimes it easy to be a bit blackpilled as songbird said, but dang, we also live in a time where there are such wonders out there to choose from if we can take advantage of enjoying them.

    • Agree: S
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  214. Jazman says:
    @AP

    In 1929, 80% of schools, more than 60% of technical schools and 30% of institutes with the Ukrainian language of instruction were already operating in the Ukrainian SSR. The network of Ukrainian-language press and publishing houses expanded: more than half of books, newspapers and magazines began to be published in Ukrainian. In 1930, in Ukraine, 68.8% of newspapers were published by the Soviet authorities in the Ukrainian language, in 1932 there were already 87.5% of them. In 1925-26. 45.8% of the books published by the communists in Ukraine were printed in Ukrainian, by 1932 this figure was 76.9%! However, there was no market for them, the growth and distribution of circulation was a purely party affair and was not dictated by demand. In the Russian-speaking regions of Ukraine, Ukrainization met with resistance from people who refused to buy literature in Ukrainian.
    For example, let’s take the Russian-speaking Donbass, which they unsuccessfully tried to Ukrainize at a particularly accelerated pace. Here is a quote from the decision of the 4th plenum of the Donetsk Regional Committee of the CP(b)U: “Strictly observe the Ukrainization of the Soviet organs, resolutely fighting against any attempts of the enemies to weaken the Ukrainization.”

    The peak of Ukrainization of education here fell precisely on 1932-33. On December 1, 1932, out of 2239 schools in Donbass, 1760 (or 78.6%) were Ukrainian, another 207 (9.2%) were mixed Russian-Ukrainian. By 1933, the last Russian-language pedagogical colleges were closed. In the 1932-33 academic year, not a single Russian-speaking elementary school class remained in Russian-speaking Makiivka, which caused violent protests from parents.

    • Replies: @AP
  215. Yevardian says:
    @Beckow

    This was the primary view in Germany-Austria. It was also the English and French view that spread to America. The rivalry with Germany made that view less aggressive.

    That point of view had completely died out in Academia by the beginning of the 20th century.

    A typical feature of this view was the glorification of ‘Vikings‘ whose shallow footprints were celebrated as ‘civilization building’. Vikings were raiders with varied origins and they hardly represented the original IE people. The very term ‘Viking’ didn’t exist at that time and was invented later. But it is only one example, the Western thought is full of similar feel-good myths.

    Honestly, I think you’re really clutching at straws here. And regardless of the historical truth of the Varangians, that the Russian foundation myth would centre around the invitation of Norse nobility to become their elected king as a compromise candidate is significant.

    Nobody is denying that at the same point that the Balto-Slavic and Indo-Aryan groups branched off from a common ancestor somewhere in the steppe.

    In recent years linguistic advances and DNA tests showed that the original IE civilization was different from the Western centric view: more eastern, mostly R1a people, and formed in the Ukraine-South Russia steppes, closer to Persian tribes. As recently as early 2000’s people were taught the Anatolian IE origin with spread NW to Europe focused on Celts, Latins (an offshoot of Celts) and Germanic tribes (Renfrew). Only grudgingly there was some reference to the ‘steppes north of the Black Sea’. It didn’t fit politically.

    I really do think you’re looking for a political angle here when there isn’t any. The Anatolian languages are most commonly seen as either a basal-split from all other IE languages, or a sister branch altogether.
    As for Western Europe, that Germanic had an extensive non IE substrate has been recognised for a very long time now. And since antiquity the Greeks recognised a very large portion of their vocabulary, culture and religion were derived from the pre-IE inhabitants of the Aegean, which they called the ‘Pelasgians’.

    Balts and Slavs were the other. Based on linguistics and DNA it is more likely that the Western part of Europe is more non-IE with larger admixtures.

    Again, what you’re saying is entirely mainstream within IE linguistics, and has been for many, many decades. The degree of linguistic borrowing in determining contact-admixture between separate peoples often has very little to no direct relationship with genetic history either anyway. For instance, north Indic languages have comparatively less non-IE loans than most Iranic languages (heavy influx of semitic loans dating from Akkadian until Arabic), but its obvious to even an illiterate onlooker that ‘racially’ Indians are mostly pre-Aryan/Dravidian by blood. Or American or Haitian Blacks, but that example is a bit crass.

    Not to be a pedant, but ‘Persian’ tribes is a misnomer, ‘Iranic’ is the word you’re looking for. Parthians, Ossetians, Scythians, Sarmatians were/are Iranic, in this context Persian only refers to the narrow region around Pars, on the southwest corner of the Iranian plateau.

  216. @German_reader

    I’m actually waiting non-ironically for the day that flying the old school pride flag is regarded as some sort of mortal sin against progressive norms. We all know it’s coming. Progress never stops after all…

    I seem to be detecting some notable, though laggardly backlash, at least in regards the trans madness. I suppose that the commitment to the craziness is probably worse in Germany than just about anywhere else though.

    Do you see any evidence of push-back brewing under the surface over there or are people still committed to being cowed?

    Tangentially, I actually view the possible reemergence of long term economically hard times as a potentially positive development. The LGBT++ madness is predicated on far too many excess calories and copious time for idiotic navel gazing. If people are forced to endure some collective pain perhaps they will realign their priorities. It’s perhaps a perverse sort of hope but I don’t think humans will collectively reject decadence of their own volition.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  217. Yevardian says:
    @Coconuts

    It can be hard to measure such things. The most linguistically conservative representative of a language group more often than not is spoken in an area a fair distance away from where that group first branched off. This makes sense, because naturally the language spoken in a cultural/political centre is going to change much more rapidly than in some isolated backwoods area, of which Lithuania is a pretty strong example. Lithuanian as a language was abandonded by the local elite (aristocrats, clergy, etc) very early in that nation’s history in favour of Polish, so it soon became a language almost exclusively of peasants.

    Generally, the local concentration of dialect-language variation is a far stronger indicator for origins of any linguistic group. The Nordic languages (perhaps even the Germanic branch as a whole) mostly likely originated around Scandia, and as I understand it, that’s where you see the greatest differentation between dialects/languages of that group, within a small area. But the Nordic language that’s ‘closest’ to Old Norse is actually Icelandic, hundreds of kilometres away.

    Similarly in West Iranic languages, Dari and Tajik are more conservative in their phonology, lexicon and grammar than Persian-proper, which has far more loans and simpler pronunciation. Or the Greek dialect ‘closest’ to ancient Greek may be Tsakonian, on a rocky isolated Peloponnessian peninsula.

    The issue with IE though, is that since it almost certainly originated on the steppe, it’s practically impossible to find any remaining traces there, as an area dominated by nomadic peoples for most of recorded history, and the geography there offering zero protection for local linguistic relics (eg. Armenian, Pamiri, Elfdalian, Romansch, Basque etc).

  218. Yevardian says:
    @Beckow

    Not if you read the pre-1990’s literature, Renfrew was considered an authority. Once it was clear that view was not sustainable, there were attempts to create a back-and-forward model that would combine the two – the spread of R1b is often explained that way, with a back and forward over the Caucasus mountains.

    Renfrew is nonetheless still widely respected even now, it’s not as if his Anatolian origins theory was his only contribution, or comprehensively obliterated. The almost complete lack of Georgian or Caucasian loanwords in Armenian was used in his argumentation, but imo that can just be explained away by the lack of broader prestige of those languages compared to Persian or Greek. Anyway Armenian phonology shows caucasian sprachbund features, like ejectives and an extensive affricate inventory. Just that your tone makes his views on the same level of discredited as old Alpine/Nordic/Med theories enthusastically espoused by writers like Lothrop Stoddard (still a great and recommended writer btw).

    I don’t know, my impression has always been that Anatolia as the IE-Urheimat was a somewhat exotic minority view which didn’t make much sense (as I understand it there’s very obvious non-IE substrate in Hittite), and that the steppe was the likely location.

    That’s Hatta or Luwian iirc, but anyway it seems to be have been almost entirely restricted for elevated religious/funerary purposes, certainly not everyday language.

    The viewpoint is plausible enough if one wants to reinterpret the spread of IE in the context of settled farming populations replacing less advanced/populous peoples to their West. The mid 20th century decipherement of Hittite (it was previously conjectured as related to Urartian or even Etruscan) was also absolutely crucial in proving Holgar Peterson’s glottalic theory of PIE, which had been floating around for decades but was mostly rejected. Hittite also retained the older animate-inanimate distinction (what Slavic has with masculine nouns is a later re-development), with later evolved into the three gender system.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  219. Mr. Hack says:
    @Jazman

    Why should I, you do such a good job of it, I thought that I’d give it try too. 🙂

  220. Yevardian says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    The best fiction writer today is Neal Stephenson. Even him you are going to have to skim a lot of dreck to get to the end of his books.

    Ugh, not familiar with him, but he sounds a lot like Thomas Pynchon, his novels were some of the most high-falutin pretentious rubbish I’d ever had the misfortune to be recommended in respectable authority in my entire life.

    Anyway, I’m a huge fan of Houellebecq, though I agree with his detractors in that the sex in his novels (at least the scenes are always isolated from plot and easily skipped over) adds nothing to them. Don Dellilo occasionally writes some decent stuff, and I think Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus (my nostalgia aside) deserves to become one of the great children’s classics. Anyway, I’m sure there’s still plenty of good stuff if you know where to look.

    The other rather obvious reason for less quality literature coming out is that many ambitious creative types now prefer to go into film, or increasingly, television writing.

  221. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Hey, if you really want to improve your evening, listen to my boy Sternenko, dissecting Girkin’s wails.

    (I like how he calls them “загарбники” – invaders, captors).

    Btw, the pocket is not yet fully closed and there is still some effort needed. But this could be the first pocket and those POWs could be exchanged. The Ukrainians are hitting a lot of supply lines and those in the pocket have supplies left only for a week or two.

    And, if everything goes accordingly, if there is success in Kherson in the coming weeks, this will be a huge boost in morale and will show to the whole world that Ukrainians can take back their land.

    [MORE]

    Btw, re: the Kraken unit. It’s pretty cool how they’re using the Tiwaz rune in their logo. It’s the symbol for the spear and the sign of the God Týr (the God of War, Mars). It’s the rune of justice, self-sacrifice, rationality, victory, spiritual warrior.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  222. LatW says:
    @Coconuts

    Renfrew admitted that Gimbutas’ hypothesis has some merit (based on recent archaeogenetic findings). They did some digging together.

    Btw, the feminists have somewhat hijacked her work, she wrote about patriarchal cultures, too.

  223. @Mr. Hack

    “2000 trapped soldiers in the cauldron”

    LMAO you idiot.

    1. This would require extensive involvement of ukrop aviation and ukrop Air defence you dumb POS. Where are there even any hints of the plenty Russian helicopters and some planes that would need to be shot down while failing to suppress these ukrop flank attacks needed to create a successful cauldron ?

    2. 2000 soldiers around an insigficant village of about 400 people? Are you even going to guess how many soldiers are even in Kherson…. to make the probability and need for 2000 of them to be in this village totally dumb?WTF is wrong with you cretin? There is not even 10000 soldiers in all of Kherson oblast you idiot!

    3. The Insider is a foreign agent, anti-russian piece of fake news BS. Even most of ukronazi fakenews is not going with this fantasy

    4. Standard piece of NATO disinformation that retards like you will swallow. Remember the ukronazi regime have promised their own a “big summer counter-attack”. It’s midsummer, and there is no sign or chance that one is going to happen significantly and certainly wont be successful. Random BS propaganda to try and cover up this failed promise is all they can do.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  224. @Yevardian

    Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus

    This piqued my interest and I see I can get it from my local library, so I’ll get them coming.

    YA books are generally extremely potentially fraught with with wokeness, explicit sex, messed up situations and dysfunction etc. so we are always happy to have more good material. My oldest is early teens and it sounds like these would be right up her alley.

    I agree that there is a lot of great material out there, and I find this true of music as well, if one knows where to look. The main difference is that the real talent seems to be at the periphery while the past greats were household names. I think it does reflect a general lowering of standards, cheapening, and balkanization of popular culture, but fortunately the more discerning are not bound to it.

  225. Mikhail says: • Website

  226. AP says:
    @Jazman

    In 1929, 80% of schools, more than 60% of technical schools and 30% of institutes with the Ukrainian language of instruction were already operating in the Ukrainian SSR. The network of Ukrainian-language press and publishing houses expanded: more than half of books, newspapers and magazines began to be published in Ukrainian. In 1930, in Ukraine, 68.8% of newspapers were published by the Soviet authorities in the Ukrainian language, in 1932 there were already 87.5% of them. In 1925-26. 45.8% of the books published by the communists in Ukraine were printed in Ukrainian, by 1932 this figure was 76.9%!

    According to the 1926 census, the Ukrainian SSR was 80.1% Ukrainian by ethnicity. Out of 29,018,187 people, 23,218,860 were ethnic Ukrainians.

    Thank you for confirming that so-called Ukrainianization merely meant Ukrainian schools matching the percentage of ethnic Ukrainians.

    Although Ukrainian was still under-used in written materials. 77% of books in the Ukrainian SSR were published in Ukrainian, the Ukrainian SSR still was getting lots of Russian-language books from Russia itself. 85% of books in Ukraine were published in Russia. Which means that only 77% of 15% of books in Ukraine were Ukrainian-language. Your source cherry-picks information in order to present a false narrative.

    You copy-pasted your information from some Russian nationalist website so who even knows if it is accurate.

    In the Russian-speaking regions of Ukraine, Ukrainization met with resistance from people who refused to buy literature in Ukrainian.

    Which ones? Crimea wasn’t part of the Ukrainian SSR at the time (and wasn’t even majority Russian, either). Cities were Russian-speaking, but as I explained the increased number of Ukrainian-language schools coincided with the influx of Ukrainian-speaking peasants. Since the percentage of Ukrainian-language schools did not exceed the percentage of ethnic Ukrainians, there was no mass scale of Russians being forced to study in Ukrainian.

    Here is percentage of Ukrainian-language postsecondary schools:

    And percentage of ethnic Ukrainians in post-secondary schools:

    It’s a fairly close match.

    The peak of Ukrainization of education here fell precisely on 1932-33. On December 1, 1932, out of 2239 schools in Donbass, 1760 (or 78.6%) were Ukrainian, another 207 (9.2%) were mixed Russian-Ukrainian.

    Any legitimate sources support this?

    Factories were exempt from Ukrainianization, so when Ukrainian peasants moved into factory towns they entered intact Russian-speaking environments and assimilated to Russian.

    • Replies: @Jazman
  227. Beckow says:
    @Yevardian

    My ‘tone‘ is your projection, I was not saying anything like that.

    DNA and linguistic advances in the last few decades have shifted the IE origins&spread theories away from a more Western-Middle East model to a Black Sea-North Caucasus model. It is still just a model and there remains a lot of complexity and unknowns – but in the 1930’s or even 1960’s and later the view of IE was as being more Western-centric and the ‘others‘ being an afterthought. The racial theories (Nazis and others) were the vulgar manifestation, but the general population also accepted it – if they cared. Today that’s no longer the case. But obviously this is complex and Renfrew did a huge amount of valuable work.

    almost complete lack of Georgian or Caucasian loanwords in Armenian

    I have wondered about that and the fact that the Caucasus mountains are not exactly easy to cross with cattle. There is a theory that the IE spread to Anatolia was from the NW through the Balkans.

    The above shift in our understanding and the DNA split that has emerged (basically R1a vs. R1b) could have interesting consequences.

    Regarding Vikings, you are reading too much into it, I never mentioned the Varangians. There is a Viking mythology in the West that overstates and misrepresents who they were, even the term ‘Viking’ is a neologism. In comparison, the infinitely more important Byzantium civilization of the same time is downplayed. (Byzantium is also a term invented later, they simply called themselves Rome).

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    , @German_reader
  228. AP says:
    @Jazman

    “Here is a shopping mall in Kharkiv before and after the Russian barbarians wrecked it”
    When you using shopping mall to hide weapons it is not shopping mall

    Blaming the victim of the invasion for the destruction because of where the victim supposedly placed weapons with which to defend itself.

    “People from shithole places like this were looting wealthier Kiev suburbs”

    These tall tales

    I have family from Bucha, everyone knows that it and the other upscale suburbs of Kiev were looted by the Russian soldiers, who were mostly from places in Russia that were poorer than wealthy Kiev suburbs.

    I was in city of Bryansk and everything is way ahead of anything comparing to Kharkov

    What year?

    In 2013 GRP per capita PPP of Bryansk oblast was \$9,438 (for Russia overall it was over \$19,000).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Russian_federal_subjects_by_GRP

    In 2013 it was \$11,111 for Ukraine:

    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.PP.CD?locations=UA

    I couldn’t find data by region but because Kharkiv was not below average for Ukraine, Kharkiv was certainly wealthier in terms of GDP PPP per capita than Bryansk.

    Kiev is shithole

    Says someone with poor taste.

    Look at public transportation in Kiev it is joke

    Belgrade is the largest city in Europe without a metro. Kiev has a metro. Kharkiv is smaller than Belgrade but has a metro.

    Kiev City is richer than Belgrade. Kiev’s nominal GDP per capita in 2013 was \$13,867. Belgrade’s was only 9,614 euros per capita in 2017 (so about \$10,900).

    (these are the years that could be easily found, feel free to search for an exact match)

    Serbia was in war and all kind of sanctions people live better then Ukrainians before 2014

    Serbia had lighter socialism so was better off before. So?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  229. If Pelosi was to put her plan of visiting Taiwan into action (desite apparent warnings from the American military), she could be the second Gavrilo Princip. This is how I intepret what the Chinese foreign ministry says.

    • Agree: S, AnonfromTN
  230. songbird says:
    @S

    I’m not really familiar with Mabel, though I suppose I must have seen her in a Chaplin flick or two. Remarkable to think that there was once a time, when movie stars died of TB.

    [MORE]

    Of course, I have heard of Fatty Arbuckle, but I can’t remember seeing one of his movies either.

    Funny to consider his nickname. Wonder when that sort of thing became un-PC. I remember seeing something like it in HK cinema from the ’80s and thinking, “now there is an interesting cultural contrast.”. But perhaps, they wouldn’t use it today?

    I suppose there must be a greater impulse to use nicknames in a place like China, due to some surnames being really common. Maybe, that itself is a blow against PC.

    I’ve heard of Little Nemo, very glancingly, but never looked up the original stuff.

    The other day, I found some old Marmaduke books at an estate sale, for 10¢. The critics seem to really hate it, but I have to say that I think some of the drawings are pretty funny. And they have a sort of spirit of the ’50s to them. Feels like my grandfather’s America.

    • Replies: @S
  231. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    During Weimar, there were like four or five women in parliament.

  232. songbird says:

    SpaceX has launched 351 metric tons to orbit so far this year. More than twice the rest of the world combined.

  233. Wokechoke says:
    @AP

    Belgrade is a bit of a dump but the Serbs were basically surrounded by NATO and abandoned by Yeltsin’s Russia. Vienna, Budapest and Belgrade are the three river cities of the Danube. Serbia had to be crushed for the Drang Nach Osten. The Southern Flank had to be secured.

    In alternative time line if Russia had fought it out over Serbia and perhaps even supported Saddam in Iraq…James Blunt in his tank actually took his orders from Generalissimo Wesley Clark to attack the Russians in Pristina. Russia might have fared okay.

  234. Coconuts says:
    @Beckow

    My ‘tone‘ is your projection, I was not saying anything like that.

    Idk, I got the same impression as Yevardian, that there was some political flavour to what you were saying.

    Aryanism doesn’t seem to have had a lot of cultural or political salience in Western Europe outside of German speaking countries but maybe it is some current I have missed. How separable is broader interest in this topic from the racial theories that used to be part of it?

    • Replies: @Beckow
  235. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Jimmy1969

    The quality of discussion on the Iran War is bad. There should be more thinking about this subject because I believe it will be the defining geopolitical event of the decade, not the Ukraine War.

    Yevardian has at least made an earnest attempt. I don’t agree with the idea that Iran wishes to hold back. I think the last several years of Trump beaking the deal, the killing of their national hero, and quasi-war with Israel have changed their views. They see a full scale attack by the US on the horizon. In Iran’s view, the US would want to weaken them through sanctions like Iraq before the invasion. I believe Iran’s strategy is to seize the opportunity of the Ukraine War and negotiations to distract and stall for time in the race to completion of the nuclear program. Russia, motiviated by payback, could supply Iran with missiles and air defense. It strengthens Iran’s position substantially and makes the war much more dangerous for the region including Israel.

    Yet, I don’t hear much about the currently foolish strategy of arming Ukraine to the teeth while being 1-2 years away from war with Iran. Israel strategists are aware of the problem of China assisting Iran. Yossi Cohen on retirement as chief of Mossad commented the US should be dovish towards China.

    ‘China isn’t against us and is not our enemy,’ recently retired Yossi Cohen says, questioning an American push for an investigation into China’s possible role in the spread of the coronavirus

    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/2021-06-08/ty-article/ex-mossad-chief-says-he-doesnt-understand-u-s-antagonism-toward-china/0000017f-e7a6-d97e-a37f-f7e71b490000

    He understands Chinese financial backing of Iran through oil purchases will strengthen Iran and make the likely war much worse. No doubt Russian weapons will have the same effect. It doesn’t seem to be a widely recongized problem in US,

    • Replies: @Greasy William
  236. Wokechoke says:
    @Barbarossa

    Harold Lloyd was always a pleasure to watch. A pair of glasses and a smile.

  237. Coconuts says:
    @Yevardian

    Anyway, I’m a huge fan of Houellebecq, though I agree with his detractors in that the sex in his novels (at least the scenes are always isolated from plot and easily skipped over) adds nothing to them.

    Agree on Houellebecq, but I think these scenes being there does have a point to it, apart from helping him sell more books. I associate it with the French tradition of making sex a philosophical or political issue (there is plenty of this; De Sade, Rousseau, Proudhon, Sartre, Lacan etc.), Houellebecq takes a deflationary or scornful attitude to parts of this, like he has been red-pilled since the 1970s, but he has a strong sort of trad romantic tendency at the same time, maybe linked to Auguste Comte. I think this explains something about the presence of those scenes and the detached porno way they are written.

    He has jokes and references to this in some of the novels, iirc in the ‘Map and the Territory’, he puts himself in the story as a character and the novel version of Houellebecq is talking about writing some scenes involving a hot Romanian radiator saleswoman.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  238. songbird says:

    One day, I hope these freakish figures that have become part of the regime will only be found in wax horror museums.

  239. songbird says:
    @A123

    Pretty crazy to think Doohan was on Juno Beach, and hit by friendly fire, of all things.

  240. Wokechoke says:
    @Coconuts

    Daniel Defoe got to the Possibility of an Island long before.

  241. Wokechoke says:

    Idle thought. What if the Chinese moved on Taiwan like a bitch?

  242. Mr. Hack says:
    @LatW

    This video works good at improving ones morning routine too! I often watch Sternenko too, however, managed to somehow miss this segment, so thanks for the heads up. What struck me immediately was Girkin’s high pitched voice. I’ve never actually heard his voice before, and quite frankly he sounds like he’s gay. I think that he was one of the very few of the first rashista invaders (zaharbniki) that managed to somehow evade FSB destruction. His warnings to the kremlin that the Ukrainians are now bombing points within Russia is an eye opener. Denis Davydov is another guy who has an interesting youtube blog that I like to watch, especially if I want a good concise summary of what’s going on at the front lines. Here’s his latest clip:

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @LatW
  243. Wokechoke says:
    @Mr. Hack

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Remagen

    The Ludendorf Bridge, built by Russian POWs in ww1. One bridge in the wider Battle of the Rhine.

    Biggest anti-aricraft battle in history. Germans threw 350 approx aircraft and the v1 and v2 rockets and the Bridge stood for long enough to maintain an American Bridgehead into Germany east of the Rhine. The Americans just kept repairing it and then laid two bridges next to it one British Bailey and one other US Engineered pontoon.

    Welcome to first round of the Battle of the Dneiper.

  244. @Yevardian

    On pp 673-693 of System of the World, Stephenson has Newton and Leibniz debate their respective ontologies. His presentation of Leibniz’ Monadology is as lucid as I have seen. His fictional Newton and Leibniz ( and Huygens and Hooke and Wren) are about my favorite minor fiction characters ever.

  245. Mr. Hack says:
    @A123

    Like you, Tucker Carlson is just another kremlin stooge. 🙂

  246. Mr. Hack says:
    @Gerard1234

    Are you alright? I worry about you sometimes. I think that what you have is an inability to get a good night’s sleep. There are many good natural supplements out there that should be able to help you. Stay away from the booze, though. Are you still taking your piano lessons? How’s that new potato patch of yours going at the dacha? You should be very proud of this new hobby of yours. Share the gardening delights with your family and friends. Don’t worry about those naughty ukrops, their fate is already sealed….

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  247. @Mr. Hack

    Good news arrived today from the Kherson direction

    .
    This story was first spread by one of Ukie talking heads, Arestovych. It caused a lot of joy in some circles, but even Ukies turned out to be less gullible than their “leadership” hoped and started asking for proof. As you cannot present proof of something that did not happen, Ukie “leaders” decided that the story became too toxic, and put forward the same Arestovych to say that it never happened. Another fake went down the drain.

    Actually, the propaganda of Kiev regime is instructive. They used to promise that the war will turn around in August. Then they started saying that maybe not in August, but in the Fall. Then Fall was replaced by “the end of the year”. Now the talk shifted to Spring.

    Reminds one of a joke of Soviet period. For those who never lived in the USSR, communists’ favorite fairytale was that they are developing the society to the next stage, which will be communist society. At this imaginary stage of social development there will be no government and no money, everyone would do what s/he can for the society and receive everything s/he needs.

    Here is the actual joke:
    A communist propagandist tells a meeting “clear features of communism are already on the horizon”. When he says that he is ready to answer questions, someone asks
    – What is horizon?
    – Horizon is an imaginary line that keeps moving away from you as you approach.

    Obviously, Ukie victory is on the horizon, right next to “clear features of communism”.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Mikhail
    , @Jazman
  248. German_reader says:
    @Barbarossa

    Do you see any evidence of push-back brewing under the surface over there or are people still committed to being cowed?

    I don’t get the impression, imo there is no “silent majority” on this or on other issues related to the progressive transformation agenda.
    People have or will soon have more existential concerns anyway, given rising inflation and energy prices and the economic meltdown that will probably happen in winter. Protest against that will also be framed as illegitimate though, the minister of the interior (a hardline “antifascist”) has already preemptively stated that the protests against inflation and rising energy prices (which haven’t even gotten off the ground to any substantial extent so far) will be exploited by far right extremists, so the security services have to be prepared.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  249. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    August isn’t even here yet, and you’re already so pessimistic? 🙁

  250. @German_reader

    There’s Western racism against Slavs and more specifically against Russians, it’s based on the perception that you’ve become bastardized with various Asiatic peoples. Scratch a Russian and you will find a Tartar.

    That’s right.

    But it isn’t true.

    If you at all understand anything about genetics, it isn’t possible to scratch a Russian and find a Tartar unless he had a Tartar mother.

    The genetic studies determined that such a situation is extremely rare.

    The mitochondrial gene pool of Russians are represented by mtDNA types belonging to typical West Eurasian groups. East Eurasian admixture was shown to be minimal and existed in low frequencies in the form of Haplogroup M. The same studies indicate West Eurasian haplogroups present at a frequency of 97.8% and 98.5% among a sample of 325 and 201 Russians respectively.

    Yet, in a situation when a Russian woman is married to a non-Russian man, their children are not considered Russian. Marriages between Asiatic and Slavic peoples have never been frequent, due to religious, traditional and cultural differences.

    You can make a search and see for yourself that Russian children are predominantly light-haired and blue-eyed.

    My personal impression regarding the Germans and the British is that they don’t look any more European, white or Aryan.

    Genetic studies show that Russians are closest to Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Belarusians, Ukrainians, and other Slavs, except for the most Southern Slavs, such as Serbs or Bulgarians.

    Of the 1228 samples, only 0.7% fell into haplogroups C, Q, and R2 which are specific to East and South Asian populations.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_studies_on_Russians

  251. Beckow says:
    @Coconuts

    Using term Aryanism again overstates the point. It suggests a heavy racial component that was mainly present in Germany for a few generations. This vulgar racial version existed because the mainstream views were along the same lines: West-centric with an emphasis on the Germanic role. With the usual Anglo evasion it was also the prevailing origin-myth in the Anglo-Saxon world.

    Without this context the Aryan extremes would be unthinkable. The broader public accepted it until WWII, even after for a few decades. There is a potential political consequence in the shift that partially separates the Western-Germanic world from the IE foundation myth – I suggested that the recent swarthy-is-great multi-culti enthusiasm could be a part of it, but that is speculation. It is too early.

    A competing Western foundation narrative of the Judeo-Christian world has been in ascendance – it has never had a large IE component: it is Middle-Eastern, hierarchical, non-honor based, etc…US culture has spread it, but it is running out of steam. Something new is emerging, it could be a complete Afro collapse or an unhinged sci-fi rootlessness: right now the two are competing for the soul of the West.

    Neither one is particularly viable, but the Western mind control is so total that we could be surprised how far they will go. Who would have thought two years ago that people will be prosecuted for saying that ‘men can’t be pregnant’, sheep will line up to be pricked with experimental shots, or that deranged Phoenix eldsters will scream “Tucker Carlson is Putin’s puppet!” (Mr. Hacks, please, get a hold of yourself!) It is moving fast.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Coconuts
  252. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    There is a Viking mythology in the West that overstates and misrepresents who they were, even the term ‘Viking’ is a neologism.

    It’s true that romanticization of Vikings was a strain in the wider Germanomania current in Germany in the late 19th/early-mid 20th centuries (though I don’t know if it was more prominent than other elements like the Germanic peoples of the Völkerwanderungszeit). However I would be very surprised if views of the Vikings were ever unequivocally positive in Britain or France…England’s national hero King Alfred fought the Danes after all, and in France there’s a long tradition of thinking in terms of repeated assaults of Germanic barbarism on Latin Christian civilization.
    So your issue seems to lie more with specific manifestations of German nationalism. I also get the impression that there’s a distinct Russian angle here…why else would you suddenly mention Byzantium? Is this about Russia’s claim to be Byzantium’s successor, whereas Scandinavian raiders and traders are supposed to have played no role at all in early Russian state formation?

    • Replies: @Beckow
  253. German_reader says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    I don’t really disagree (there sure seem to be a lot of blonde people in Russia), and I didn’t mean to endorse anti-Russian racism. From my pov the issues between Russia and the West are mostly cultural and political.

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  254. Jimmy1969 says:
    @Jimmy1969

    Iran is nothing but a minor regional issue and a thorn in Israel’s side. The defining event of the 21th Century is war between us and China and we would be smart to have Russia on our side.

  255. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    Vikings are a big thing in the Anglo world, check out the TV show(s), the memes, etc..It doesn’t have to be all positive, there is a lot of ‘we are bada.ss like the Vikings‘ among the less Testosterone deprived Anglos. The Vikings have been imported into gender-mania with “Viking female warriors”, and I have even been to a Viking museum in US where the curator excitedly talked about how Vikings invented and spread amber around the world. It is a cultural thing.

    Regarding Byzantium, you are projecting again. There is such an increased sensitivity in the West that now even mentioning Byzantium gets tagged with Russia. Maybe they will ban Byzantium next because of some later Russian claims?

    Given the two cultures of roughly the same era, Vikings and Byzantium, one is central to the Western self-image and one is usually marginalized and mostly ignored. In reality, Byzantium was about an order of magnitude more important to the European civilization. Most of our current knowledge about the ancient world was passed to us and formed by the Roman Byzantium, the Renaissance was triggered by the Byzantines who moved to Italy with endless books and knowledge. There are endless examples, but both Arabs and Andalusia often get more credit. It has nothing to do with Russia, but given the hysteria in the West I won’t be surprised if it is added as a target.

    In Germany, with the Turks, there could be a budding future celebration of the “Ottomans”. But as long as you vigilantly keep any Russianism out, you should be fine, the bosses will approve.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  256. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    Vikings are a big thing in the Anglo world, check out the TV show(s)

    I’m not sure that isn’t a recent phenomenon, and a pretty strange one. May be linked to de-Christianization and the decline of the traditional national narratives.
    Haven’t seen the TV show (or that recent movie The Northman), Vikings don’t have much appeal to me.

    There is such an increased sensitivity in the West that now even mentioning Byzantium gets tagged with Russia.

    No, but we were talking about Western perceptions of Slavs and Balts, so I wondered why you suddenly brought up Byzantium, you’re not Greek after all. I actually agree with many of your points regarding the denigration of Byzantium and the downplaying of its role in transmission of ancient texts, the pro-Islamic multiculti narrative is really pernicious in this regard.
    But I don’t think Vikings have ever been central to Western perceptions of the Middle Ages (except maybe in Scandinavia) compared to knights, crusaders, the cultural achievements of Latin Christendom etc.

    In Germany, with the Turks, there could be a budding future celebration of the “Ottomans”. But as long as you vigilantly keep any Russianism out, you should be fine, the bosses will approve.

    Don’t be so fucking annoying, if I had to choose between Russia and Turkey, of course I would choose Russia.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  257. Wokechoke says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Russian DNA spread can be distinguished from Ukies by the admixture of Finns or Greeks respectively.

  258. @AP

    The 1933 reforms seem to have streamlined into Russian. It made Ukrainian identical to the southern Russian with respect to those sounds.

    There are 15 Ukrainian dialects, who said that one of the is supposed to dominate the others – your Galician quasi-Nazis?

    There has never been one standard version of Ukrainian spoken everywhere. Like any other language it has local variations. Yours is not better than any other.

    Ukrainian is also spoken by a large émigré population, particularly in Canada, The United States, Brazil, Argentina, and Australia. The founders of this population primarily emigrated from Galicia, which used to be part of Austro-Hungary before World War I, and belonged to Poland between the World Wars. The language spoken by most of them is based on the Galician dialect of Ukrainian from the first half of the twentieth century.

    You speak an outdated local dialect.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_dialects

    The alphabet whose users created arguably the world’s greatest prose literature probably didn’t need to be improved.

    Well, if you say that your Russian isn’t good enough to comment on it, then you have probably read this arguably the world’s greatest prose in translation, and apparently this is why you consider it to be that good.

    The original, genuine Dostoevsky is practically unreadable. His Russian is ugly. The others so-called great Russian authors are the best in the history of boredom.

    Honestly, the best of Russian prose is unknown in the West.

    As for the orthography, reading anything in the older style is cumbersome and loaded with letters that are pronounced the same but written differently, and it does make both reading and learning to read a lot more difficult.

    The best Russian prose was written after the reform, in a cleaner and more dynamic style.

    Ukrainian diaspora has far lower rates of abortion, HIV, out of wedlock births, divorce, violence, etc. than do people in the morally degenerated ex-Soviet Ukraine.

    During my time in the Soviet Ukraine most girls were keeping virginity before marriage. This wasn’t done out of religious considerations – that was exactly the Soviet morality, about which you have such a negative opinion.

    No one could have imagined that Ukrainian ladies were going to turn into prostitutes, filling the brothels around Europe and the Middle East. But that’s what happened once the Soviet morality had been abolished.

    This is your Ukraine, 30 years after the USSR. Don’t blame the Soviet morality, these people haven’t seen any of it.

    The original standardized language was based on the Poltava dialect which was in the center-east. The reforms either made it closer to Russian outright, or added elements from the easternmost Ukrainian (that is, closest to Russian).

    A language cannot be standardized. The rules of grammar, spelling and orthography can change, but it doesn’t change the language.

    For example the southern Russian dialect is different from the average Russian, and the rules of orthography and spelling do not eliminate the differences between the two. People do not learn to speak in school, but learn from their parents.

    There’s no such thing as the standard language, there are dialects and variations in pronunciation even in the US.

    He [W.R. Rishi] might not have been familiar with Ukrainian, or even Polish.

    He is a linguist, he doesn’t have to be familiar. He can open a vocabulary and a book on grammar and compare the similarities and differences.

    And he said, “This is not so when we compare Sanskrit with any other language belonging to the Indo-European group.” Therefore, he did compare with Ukrainian and Polish.

    The Indian language came from the North, their upper castes are distantly related to Slavs.

    The Aryans spoke Sanskrit, and they came from the North, the uppermost caste of the Brahmins has been preserved ethnically pure due to the regulations, with very low number of mixed marriages. Up to 75 percent of the Brahmins belong to the R1a haplotype.

    My understanding is that Slavs are descended from the same group who moved south and captured India; the Slavs were the ones from this group who were content to stay behind in the cool northern forests.

    The Aryans went south and the Slavs went west, for a reason that remains a mystery. But they weren’t exactly of the same ethnic group, considering the linguistic differences. Apparently, both peoples had lived close to each other and the Slavs had been influenced by the more advanced culture of the Aryans, before the split-up.

    The Ukrainian neo-pagans worship Dazhboh. President Yushchenko’s wife grew up in a Ukrainian neo-pagan family.

    Dumbass, neo-Nazi, fake and reconstructed bull crap.

    The ancient Slavs celebrated the solstice days. That requires understanding of cosmology. Ask any of these neo-pagan idiots what a solstice is – they have no idea.

    Christianity brought civilization to the Eastern Slavs. Instead of worshipping crude sticks they built cathedrals, schools, hospitals.

    Christianity maybe brought some civilization to the Germanic peoples. For the Greeks, the Romans and the Eastern Slavs it was a catastrophe.

    The early religion of the Slavs wasn’t idolatrous, the sticks were brought by the Varangians, it was their thing. The entire pagan pantheon was of the Nordic origin.

    Yet the land where the Varangians traveled was called in their chronicles Garðaríki – the land of towns, because the Varangians were still living in villages and didn’t know how to build of stone, whereas the Slavs had seven towns built of white alabaster.

    And what hospitals are you talking about, if the first introduction to the concept of medicine the Christians encountered during the late Renaissance, after capturing the libraries of Andalusia.

    And what good is in building these cathedrals, if there’s a doll on a cross before which people fall on their knees and read prayers. How is it different from worshiping crude sticks, exactly?

    As pagans they would not have survived in the long run, not in that part of the world; Christianization probably saved the Slavs from later Islamification at the hands of the Tatars or Turks.

    The teaching of the Vedas is incomparably more sophisticated than most of the Muslim creeds, except for a number of esoteric, Sufi, sectarian denominations. Yet literally any Muslim creed is superior to that of the Catholic church.

    The Muslims didn’t burn people at the stake in public squares.

    Christianization was a catastrophe for Europe, it ruined the culture, interrupted the scientific development, imposed a number of insane and ridiculous ideas on the people, and finally created a terrorist organization that kept the entire population in horror for centuries.

    Anything is better than Christianity – Judaism, for example, was a lot more attractive, which is why there are so many Ashkenazim with blond hair and blue eyes, especially in the Polish and Lithuanian diasporas. Despite the danger, a lot of people were choosing to abandon this so-called religion.

    Paganism only survived in India due to huge population and geographic isolation.

    This paganism, as you call it, had a book called Ayurveda, in which cataract surgery was described about a thousand years before Christianity. The Christians learned about it from the Arabs, who learned about it from the Hindus.

    You belong to a barbaric tribe, ignorant and retarded.

    • Replies: @AP
  259. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    linked to de-Christianization and the decline of the traditional national narratives.

    There seems to be a master narrative that de-Christianizes Europe and also changes our understanding of Christianity to be a wishy-washy nothingness that basically regurgitates ancient Middle Eastern fairy tales from what is referred to as “the old testament”. We all have our ancient traditions and narratives, I like the ones from the European culture better – even if they are also not necessarily true.

    choose between Russia and Turkey, of course I would choose Russia.

    You may not be allowed to have a choice. I suspect that the war was provoked to make sure that the European part of the West doesn’t have a choice.

  260. @Here Be Dragon

    брюки is down as from Dutch “broek” but they are both from the Viking. That said, there is a whole academic industry in Russia for denying foreign influence on the language. (It’s a characteristic of a certain kind of nationalism. English had Angosaxonism for a while – I still think it’s better to avoid Latin when possible).

  261. @Mr. Hack

    This process is only beginning. Stocks are being used up. By the end of September there should be real effects.

  262. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    But noone is prosecuting me for telling the truth?….
    You’ve got to admit that there’s some logic behind this one – that’s why it’s so funny! 🙂

  263. @Matra

    I thought the newer Hollywood production of Sherlock Holmes, reversing the physiques of Holmes and Watson, was just as disrespectful and wrong as a black non-binary playing him. Holmes was short and Watson tall and lean.

    Although the stories are obviously very Anglo, the character of Sherlock Holmes could very easily be played as a Russian (it’s no surprise that we did such a great Soviet TV adaption of Sherlock Holmes, often claimed as the best ever). His scientific method and single-minded approach to his pursuits, his humour, how he gets irritated and general reaction to idiots, appreciation of high culture and other characteristics are very similar to many educated Russian man.

    Holmes is the product of the experiences of the author – a medic and journalist who in both jobs went on colonial exploration and military expeditions. In theory, with the medical/forensic aspect you could fake some BS having a black guy of the time period competent in these skills…. but you could not have a black guy make these observations that Holmes does all the time as an essential part of the character, because it require a deep knowledge of the world, and customs (and natural remedies) of primitives that could only be obtained with that perspective from a white man in time of colonial conquest and exploration.

    • Replies: @Matra
  264. @AP

    but I’ve been reading

    LMAO- for a pathological liar, diseased scumbag as yourself I can assume that 20 hours a day on Twitter to the point of haemmoroids reading clinically dumb ukronazi bot accounts (in English) + some readouts from Unian (again in English) represents the “knowledge” a bag of excrement as yourself has on the SMO.

    Even the Ameoba has a more sophisticated standard of life than an autistic scum troll freak like yourself.

    I just know without checking that a freak as yourself would have just, cluelessly mass regurgitated every day since start of the SMO, every bit of NATO coordinated and failed BS like with “Florida Guard training”, Javelins, Bayraktar, NLAW, Starstreak, Harpoon and “Cossack DNA” (lol) etc. Of course NATO BS propaganda and your own instantaneous BS is all that pitiful trash like you can try to rely on – because you have zero knowledge of 404 land, their people, mentality, the infrastructure, all the minutiae…. or connection to any of it.

  265. @Mr. Hack

    Are you going to attempt to answer any of my comprehensive points, you rat-faced dogshit, Panochka Hack?

    How is it possible to create a cauldron of 2000 heroes, without Ukrop airdefence taking out several Russian helicopters sent to blast away the mass of Ukronazis attacking the flanks? Not even a rumour of anything being shot down from the sky over there

    Do you have any idea of how large the number of Russian military is in Kherson, so that the ridiculously large number of 2000 in and around a small and strategically insignificant spot would have ANY credibility?
    It’s bad enough that NATO propaganda has convinced dumb plankton in 404 that 50k Russian heroes are “dead”, with presumably 150k injured in 220k Russia/LDNR coalition (LMAO)….. versus an enemy on their 5th wave of mobilisation

    It’s midsummer retard – where is the promised summer counter-attack? We all know fu*kall will occur except more annihilation by Russia and territory and peoples liberated

    I noticed, and I wonder if you did, that the ukrop government official dickhead who signed the grain deal in Istanbul just 2 days before… appeared to have a Bandera tribute haircut!Would be typical of these sadist-degenerates as a quite a sizeable amount of these losers have got Bandera-haircuts and made clear that it’s not just regular male pattern baldness, but a tribute to the swine. I reckon it’s 50/50 if deliberate or not.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Mr. Hack
  266. Wokechoke says:
    @Gerard1234

    Russians have 6,000 men across the Dneiper. I’d guess they are concentrated in Kherson and around the Dam to the north. Could be a Dien Bien Fu disaster but it could also play out with Russia keeping a marvelous Bridgehead that cracks open Ukraine to annexation.

  267. S says:
    @songbird

    I’m not really familiar with Mabel, though I suppose I must have seen her in a Chaplin flick or two. Remarkable to think that there was once a time, when movie stars died of TB.

    Probably you’ve seen Normand in some Chaplin flicks. She was instrumental in ‘the Tramp’s’ rise to stardom. Normand played her comedy a bit straight, with some slapstick thrown in.

    You just don’t hear of prominent people nowadays dying of TB in the West, and not many others besides. Orwell was the last well known individual I know of to do so. That was about 1950.

    Of course, I have heard of Fatty Arbuckle, but I can’t remember seeing one of his movies either.

    He’s been kind of forgotten. There was a big alleged murder of a starlet tied to him in about 1921. Though he was fully exonerated, it wrecked his career.

    Anyhow, before there was an Oliver Hardy, before there was a John Candy, before there was a Chris Farley, and, leaving his politics entirely aside, before there was a plus sized Rush Limbaugh, who in his early days on TV seemed at times to be trying to channel the spirit of this over-sized silent comedian, there was Fatty Arbuckle, the trailblazer for all the many obese comics on film and television everywhere who would follow after him.

    There should be a very large statue dedicated to Fatty Arbuckle in Hollywood for that reason alone. But, alas…

    Funny to consider his nickname. Wonder when that sort of thing became un-PC.

    He didn’t like the name ‘Fatty’ himself. Apparently Arbuckle didn’t have much choice about it.

    As an aside, the singer Enrico Caruso told Arbuckle he should quit the film business and develop his excellent singing voice, where Caruso thought Arbuckle could make it big.

    Happily, Fatty Arbuckle declined Caruso’s suggestion and stayed in comedy. A good thing, too, as without Arbuckle’s comic genius, this world would be a lot less funny of a place for sure. 🙂

    [MORE]

    • Thanks: songbird
  268. @Philip Owen

    There is a whole academic industry in Russia for denying foreign influence on the language.

    Nonsense.

    What foreign influence – loanwords? How can it be denied?

    Please, provide a reference to this “academic industry” or admit that you have no clue in what you are talking about.

  269. @German_reader

    Bullshit, you mass-murdering idiot.

    Westerners naturally LOVE Russia – that’s why the western elites have to engage in such large-scale, multi-vector and repetitive brainwashing on their populations to make them against Russia . Repetitive element is critical. It works on intellectual-amoeba with a blood-libel to do (for POS murdering grandfather) like you.

    Anybody who listens to or reads Putin, without this idiot mass propaganda brainwashing western media apparatus campaign….. sees a guy extremely intelligent, reasonable, sophisticated and typically EUROPEAN in the BS way they think of the term. Putin in many ways acts like a German in his temperament and style.

    Dr Zhivago is the 6th most financial successful film in history. Its because people LOVE Russia more than anything else. With and without USSR. Can you imagine what a financial disaster it would be if some cretin decided to do an “epic” film about any of the failed and irrelevant polish “uprisings” against Russian Empire? or some love story of 2 Polish fascist scum during opportunistic war against Communists? Or the irrelevant, deserved Katyn fake ( unless it was a Naked Gun style farce-comedy about useless Polish officer losers)? These films would struggle to make 2 dollars! Nobody gives a f**k.

    But give Westerners story about Russia and they love it.

    Piano Concerto No. 2 by Rakhmaninov (ANY of the 3 movements, individually) are the 3 most popular requested pieces to play, everyday on western classical music stations. After that it’s any of the movements in Rimsky-Korsakov Scherezadze.

    More people visit the Winter Palace each year than they do for ghoulish shithole city Lvov, or any individual attraction in boring Berlin or irrelevant Warsaw.

    Western elites are the ones who want Omar Sharif to play Dr Zhivago, the Jews of Anglo-Saxon countries and Poles and German Nazis on blood-libel mission are those “elites” trying to brainwash against Russia…… and Anglo-American insecure elite excrement who constantly have extensively worked with, and then strongly against Russia for 300 years.

    You can see how insecure these retards are when they celebrate Putin having to wait 45 seconds for Erdoğan.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @AnonfromTN
  270. German_reader says:
    @Gerard1234

    Dr Zhivago is the 6th most financial successful film in history.

    It’s just sentimental nonsense, movies are for stupid people who can’t read anyway.
    Do you also watch soap operas?

    Or the irrelevant, deserved Katyn fake

    Wajda’s film about it was pretty good (for a movie), certainly more interesting than boring Dr Zhivago.

    But give Westerners story about Russia and they love it.

    People also love to watch movies with Nazis in them. Or horror movies. Movies about Russia with its endless succession of disasters probably satisfy the same sort of craving.

  271. Matra says:
    @Gerard1234

    Although the stories are obviously very Anglo, the character of Sherlock Holmes could very easily be played as a Russian (it’s no surprise that we did such a great Soviet TV adaption of Sherlock Holmes, often claimed as the best ever)

    I’ve heard good things about the series with Vasily Livanov from the 1980s some of which are available on YouTube with English subtitles. I’ll probably watch a few later this summer as I’m all out of non-woke crime TV shows to watch. Last summer I watched all the Jeremy Brett Sherlock Holmes series which is also available on YouTube and that’s been the best one I’ve seen so far.

  272. German_reader says:
    @German_reader

    Wajda’s film about it was pretty good (for a movie)

    Looked it up again, it was even shown on Russian tv in 2010. Back then Putin didn’t doubt that Katyn was committed by the NKVD.
    Pretty strange and depressing, who would have thought then that we’d end up with a Russia-NATO proxy war in 2022.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Gerard1234
  273. Mr. Hack says:
    @Gerard1234

    “Bandera tribute haircut”

    Another example of your superior hipster like knowledge, Geraldina. Thank you! I learn so much from you, I sit in awe sometimes. I wasn’t aware of this new fashion trend, but did find one site that requested for any video that could help prominent hairdressers try to recreate the look. Perhaps, you could answer this request, since you seem to know so much about it? Have you personally restyled your own look, to mimic this new fashion trend?


    Here’s what the site “Hairlebrity” has to say about Bandera:

    Stepan Bandera had a variety of different haircuts during his career. He reached fame as a world-class politician. Nevertheless, the Ukrainian anti-communist was especially known for his beautiful fashion sense and his adorable personality. Before his tragic passing at the age of 50 he was again and again featured in tabloids due to his superb hair and looks. Do you have a step-by-step tutorial on how to look like Stepan Bandera? Share your thoughts and experiences!

    https://www.hairlebrity.com/Stepan%20Bandera

  274. Wokechoke says:
    @German_reader

    film is a form of mass therapy.

  275. Matra says:
    @German_reader

    It’s just sentimental nonsense, movies are for stupid people who can’t read anyway.
    Do you also watch soap operas?

    So you weren’t touched when Yuri dies of a heart attack after seeing Lara (he thinks) from the tram? You must be one of those heartless German robots I’ve heard about. It’s a great film. And unlike Sharif Julie Christie looks Russian, or at least she does to me.

    Wajda’s film about it was pretty good (for a movie), certainly more interesting than boring Dr Zhivago

    I preferred Dr Zhivago, though I like some of Wajda’s early films. Too bad he was friends with that child rapist Roman Polanski.

    For some reason Germany has punched below its weight in cinema and TV, certainly when compared to France, Italy and Britain but the 1980s TV series Heimat was great. I was a teenager when I saw it so maybe if I saw it again I’d find faults in it – maybe leftist messaging – but based on memory I’d rank it among the best historical dramas of all time.

  276. Wokechoke says:
    @Matra

    Julie Christie looks pretty. Absolute babe. the casting of Sharif was intended to emphasize total foreigness. He played Mongolians. Maybe he can prove he’s a Mamluke.

  277. @Gerard1234

    There is no point in being impolite. Personal insults do not make arguments stronger. If anything, the addition of personal attacks to perfectly valid arguments makes them weaker.

    Besides, Ukie supporters are not necessarily stupid. They remind me of schizophrenics. In conversation schizophrenics appear perfectly normal, sometimes even intelligent and witty, until you hit the point where they have a lose screw. Then you get something delusional, crazy, and totally idiotic. Even then remember professional advice of psychiatrists: never argue with a patient.

    Ukraine is the lose screw point of Ukie supporters. When the discussion concerns other things they deserve to be treated like normal human beings.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  278. Mr. Hack says:

    Putin, acting “like a a German in his temperament and style”?

    Looks more to me a if his stature and importance a s a world leader has awkwardly diminished.

    Nobody kept this German waiting for a meeting?…….

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  279. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    Turkey its NATO membership is pretty fake

    Erdogan is a close ally of Putin, which seems superficially against the raison d’être of NATO, according to the propaganda presentation.

    But reality, Russia doesn’t care much about NATO in general, but only against the specific possibility of the certain hostile states (e.g. Ukraine, Baltic states), being protected by NATO.

    That is, NATO is a problem to the extent it protects enemies such as Baltic states, Poland, potentially Ukraine and Georgia.

    In case of Turkey, then Russia doesn’t view NATO negatively, but even wants to provide a NATO military with weapons including sensitive weapons for personal defense such as S-400.

    Turkey seems like one of the more important NATO countries, because they control the Black Sea via Bosphorus, as well as the entrance to the Middle East.

    Moreover, they seem to have high investment in the military. However, their military is largely dependent on Germany and America industry, which produces their weapons and equipment. So, there is not so much independent power, but more an extension of Germany shipbuilding and American aviation.

    Erdogan wants to import Russian weapons and to build relations with Russia, is sensible from his perspective, as without diversifying supply, he becomes increasingly under possibility of veto by narrow range of suppliers (who had possibly even supported failed coup d’état in Ankara in July 2016.

    Turkey has great power ambitions

    Turkey is only a regional power. Their interest is related to neighbor countries – islands in the East Mediterranean or some border regions in the Levant regions.

    Great powers are powerful countries like United Kingdom, France, (nowadays also China is a great power, except culturally where it has less influence than some regional powers like South Korea). Aside from their e.g. far higher technological level, countries like United Kingdom have GDP almost equivalent to 6 times Turkey to support their global ambitions, blue-water navy, nuclear weapons, UN security council, etc.

  280. Monkeypox is the vaccine against sodomy (or faggotry in general). I would actually suggest locking down heteros, to destroy the economy and society again, for everyone’s anger to be redirected on the whole faggotry business and kill wokeness forever.

  281. Wokechoke says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Oddly, Churchill, though he had met many Germans and Austrians never met Hitler personally. Le Carre or another espionage writer dreamed up a “fictional” meeting they had after the fall of France, to discuss terms. Some say the meeting took place in Northern France.

    • Replies: @Matra
    , @Coconuts
  282. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    If you are talking about the historical tribes in the 8th century (rather than later nationalities speaking slavic languages), Slavs were central European peoples, of course speaking an Aryan origin language like most of the nationalities of Europe, with an Aryan origin religion (not much different from neighbors), before the Semitic/Eastern Mediterranean religion adopted by Vladimir I in 988.

    A portion of Slavs, emigrated to what is nowadays called Russia, in the 8th-9th century, becoming dominant to extent of subsequently slavicizing the preslavic population in those areas.

    However, a lot of ancestors of modern Russians have a much more ancient origin in the region, will be descended from preslavic tribes who pre-existed the Slavs’ immigration, which are named in the chronicles, some like Vepsy are still preserved native languages.

    Balts and Slavs were the other.

    Exoticization or separation of Slavs from Western culture, has been something recent. By the middle 20th century, all slavic-speaking nationalities have nominally communist governments, which has added a very short-term, separation from Western Europe.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
    , @Beckow
  283. Matra says:
    @Wokechoke

    When visiting Munich in the early 1930s Churchill requested a meeting with Hitler but the latter turned him down. Given Hitler’s ability to read people whom he met in person maybe history would’ve been different if he’d agreed to that meeting.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  284. Wokechoke says:
    @Matra

    I’ve heard about this near miss. Stalin was Waiting For Hitler much of the time.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  285. @Wokechoke

    Stalin was Waiting For Hitler much of the time.

    If memory serves, they’ve never met.

  286. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Sternenko

    I like that he’s quite eloquent, he’s a law student. And, ofc, I enjoy his snarkiness. 🙂

    [MORE]

    What struck me immediately was Girkin’s high pitched voice. I’ve never actually heard his voice before, and quite frankly he sounds like he’s gay.

    Oh, that’s not his real voice (it was sped up in the video). He has a normal voice, and no, he’s not gay at all (he’s twice married, I think).

    that managed to somehow evade FSB destruction

    He has some kind of an FSB cover.

    Yea, there are a lot of good vloggers, I watch Zhdanov, Ivan Yakovina, Taras Berezovets.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  287. sher singh says:

    dharma-yuddha

    To establish a realm of dharam— to manifest interiorized gnostic unity with the Absolute temporally, to be eternally close to the gods, which is what satiyuga-qua-sacred time essentially is— requires waging chaoskampf against the forces of adharam.

    https://mahvra.substack.com/p/on-the-nature-of-satiyuga

  288. Coconuts says:
    @Wokechoke

    Was that writer Len Deighton in the book XPD? That is about a secret Hitler-Churchill meeting iirc.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  289. Coconuts says:
    @Beckow

    Using term Aryanism again overstates the point. It suggests a heavy racial component that was mainly present in Germany for a few generations. This vulgar racial version existed because the mainstream views were along the same lines…

    I don’t find it easy to follow what you are saying here, is it that there was a mainstream view of Indo-Europeans/Aryans and their origins that was distinct from what people like Gobineau, Vacher de Lapouge and those German Aryanist academics who came up with the Northern hypothesis were writing about? Is it possible to judge what the cultural and political impact of this non-racial mainstream view was outside of German speaking Europe?

    With the usual Anglo evasion it was also the prevailing origin-myth in the Anglo-Saxon world.

    Do you mean among the Anglo academics (archaeologists/linguists, I suppose) who were writing about Indo-Europeans and Aryans, or that this idea was widely known and recognised among the British and American general public? This is because the next thing you write makes me think there was supposed to be some wide ranging cultural and political significance attached to the theme of IE origins:

    There is a potential political consequence in the shift that partially separates the Western-Germanic world from the IE foundation myth – I suggested that the recent swarthy-is-great multi-culti enthusiasm could be a part of it, but that is speculation. It is too early.

    Imo the reason for this is the Liberal/Enlightenment tradition in the West (I think this is the actual origin myth of the current ‘West’), this starts with the Glorious Revolution in England, the Enlightenment, American Revolution, 1789 in France, Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, moves on to Communism and the radical left, post-1945 mythology from the victory over Fascism, it’s just that playing out.

    Indo-European related ideas in the cultural and political sphere seem to interest WNs mainly.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
  290. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AnonfromTN

    Such a confident Kiev regime establishment –

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Mr. Hack
  291. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Jimmy1969

    The Iraq War lasted years, caused a million regional deaths, and killed thousands of US troops. The Iran War is even more daunting and could claim thousands of Israeli lives. What will unfold is not going to be a “minor regional issue”. The quality of your comment is as bad as the ones made by others.

  292. @Dmitry

    Completely ignorant piece of drivel.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  293. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Beckow

    That lesson has to be relearned in each generation., nobody will be invading Iran.

    I don’t think Israel or the US can live with an Iran with nuclear weapons. The main Iranian nuclear weapons facility is 80 meters underground making it difficult to bomb and destroy. If Iran keeps on developing its nuclear program, I think the US will lead an invasion of Iran in 1-2 years. With a major war and domestic unrest, 2024 is set to become the wildest year in American history since the US Civil War.

    A smart Russian strategist like Karlin should be all over this. How to make the US and Israel realize the added catastrophe of the US pursuing a proxy war in Ukraine while the Iran War is around the corner?

    • Replies: @Beckow
  294. Wokechoke says:
    @Coconuts

    I think that’s the book.

  295. Wokechoke says:
    @Mikhail

    when you listen to these podcasts where American analysts assess the shortfalls and flaws in Soviet and German battle plans and execution you have to laugh. Even the war in Ukraine is probably beyond the ken of US experience.

  296. The abandoned and forgotten Soviet Wunderwaffe.

  297. Jimmy1969 says:
    @Jimmy1969

    You have your facts and conclusions all wrong

  298. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Somebody took the scissors to the newspaper article that was the subject of the following tweets. I wonder why?

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FX_Yl10VQAAJv7U?format=png&name=large

    OMG, a country at war is trying to make life harder for the traitorous fifth columnists within…what next, killing of murderous invaders?

  299. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Yout criticism of Dmitry’s perfectly fine comment is much worse.

  300. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Jimmy1969

    In your opinion, what are the odds of full scale war between the US and Iran by the end of 2024?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  301. Mr. Hack says:
    @LatW

    He must be one of those “Ukro-Nazis” that Putler is rallying against. I notice that he has no qualms in displaying a portrait of Bandera on his desk behind where he sits for his podcasts, similar to the one that I’ve used within comment #277. Actually, if you compare the hairdo of Putler within the video clip in comment #282, where he’s unceremoniously waiting to meet with Erdogan, with the one that Bandera is known for, they look quite a bit a like. 🙂

    • Replies: @LatW
  302. @china-russia-all-the-way

    The pentagon isn’t going to do anything but rattle their sabres until they walk back the diversity bullshit and that isn’t going to happen any time soon. 2024? Very not likely.

  303. Matra says:

    Ukrainians are starting to sound like kiddies on an American college campus. I’ve seen a lot of this on the Ukrainian side. Real ‘Western’ cargo cult vibes.

  304. Coconuts says:
    @Coconuts

    Well, there seems to be some data on wikipedia on this topics, at least useful for clarification of terms:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordicism

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryanism

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19th-century_Anglo-Saxonism

    One of the implications of distancing the Western world from the IE foundation myth seems to be that the views of the Aryan put forward by Gobineau, Lapouge, the Germans authors are no longer as tenable, because they were deducing various characteristics of the Aryan master race from the features of Germanic, Latin, Classical Greek and Middle Eastern culture and civilisation. Also those arguments WNs sometimes make about German idealist philosophy and its direct ancestral filiation to Aryan thought may be made more doubtful.

  305. @Philip Owen

    A month ago, someone, I forget who, managed to find claims that the good viking words хольм and брюки were Slavic when Holm for sure was in use from the early Norwegian Viking settlements in the UK 50-100 years before the Swedes went to Russia. Later, Danish rulers were connected by family from England to Kiev and words may well have flowed both ways but usually it is only the ones from the high status court language that get adopted.

  306. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    Inaccurate. Slavs (and Balts) were ‘much different‘ from their Western neighbors linguistically and in origin. They were closer to the original IE Aryan tribes who spread to Iran. DNA and linguistics show that Balto-Slavs were a part of the Aryan-IE ethnogenesis. Western Europeans were not – they are closely related but split off much earlier and mixed with different groups.

    Obviously we have all mixed afterwards, Russians with Ural-Finns and others, Czechs with Celts and Germans, South Slavs with the Balkan IE people and Turks, etc…but I hear that Ukies are pure, they never mixed and definitely were never touched by anything from Asia (the Huns probably just flew over Ukraine.)

    Exoticization or separation of Slavs from Western culture, has been something recent.

    Otherness is a matter of degree, but it has existed between the West and Slavs-Balts-Finns from the beginning. Of course, at that time most Western nations also had a substantial otherness within. But the east was always viewed differently: combination of threats, underdevelopment, and opportunity to plunder and expand.

    Your odd attempt to blame it on ‘communists‘ is part of the mental otherness, it is quite comical. You should be a V4 neo-liberal politician, they say it literally all the time, ‘because commies’…What’s next? commies caused bad weather? Sure.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Dmitry
  307. Matra says:

    A ‘misinformation’ agency established by the Ukrainian government has come out with a list of Westerners it accuses of “promoting Russian propaganda”. Hilariously, they even put Edward Luttwak on the list.

  308. Beckow says:
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    With a major war and domestic unrest, 2024 is set to become the wildest year in American history since the US Civil War.

    Possibly, but predicted disasters have a way of not happening. It could be a random Rep weasel (Bush III or someone like that) against a Dem throwback like Gore or Kerry (just kidding, don’t panic!) Add inflating away debts to a more manageable level, endless C19 shots, and the media drum-beat of ‘we are winning!!!‘, and no wars will be necessary. Look at the hapless Mr. Hacks for an example of how US medicates itself – they don’t need much: a few soothing words and pictures, and hope. It keeps them going.

    If Ukraine has shown anything it is that large resisting countries can’t be invaded on land without major effort. We understood it in the past, WWII, Vietnam, Iran-Iraq war, etc…but the silly NATO ‘bomb them to surrender‘ kick-ass behavior for two decades against smaller states made people forget that land wars are never a cake walk.

    Invading Iran would require either Turkey, Iraq or Pakistan to take part, none of them look likely to do it. (Saudis are not even theoretically capable of it.) There was a plan 10-20 years ago to squeeze Iran between Iraq and Afghanistan, stir up internal unrest – mostly ethnic like Azeris and Baluchis – but as we have seen it collapsed with US inability to sustain casualties. There could be bombing attacks and more attempts at internal change. Most likely the current wars against Iranian allies everywhere will be all that happens.

  309. Off topic:
    what does Snowden mean by this tweet or what does he refer to: “It doesn’t really matter how you feel about the Jan. 6th stuff: bureaucrats destroying government records to keep them out of the public’s hands should land every single person involved in jail. It is a crime against the public’s right to know.”
    I don´t understand it, any tips would be appreciated!

  310. @Mr. Hack

    Have the Russians rebuilt anything there yet, or are they stuck still trying to get water and electricity to all corners of the city?

    There are plenty of internet publications, texts, and videos about the ongoing reconstruction of Mariupol

    https://www.google.com/search?q=%D1%81%D1%82%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B8%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%BB%D1%8C%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE+%D0%B2+%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%B8%D1%83%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%BB%D0%B5&oq=%D1%81%D1%82%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B8%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%BB%D1%8C%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE+%D0%B2+%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%B8&aqs=chrome.0.0i512j69i57j0i22i30l8.3201j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    Man, you are really living in a bubble!

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  311. German_reader says:
    @Beckow

    But the east was always viewed differently: combination of threats, underdevelopment, and opportunity to plunder and expand.

    It wasn’t really that different from the relations of other peripheral regions with the expanding core of Latin Christendom (Robert Bartlett, The making of Europe is interesting on this). You can easily find parallels for the development of medieval Poland and Bohemia in Scotland, Ireland, or indeed England herself (where the Norman conquest, the subsequent decimation of the native elites and the demolition of Anglo-Saxon culture, saints’ cults etc. were much more drastic than anything that happened in Poland or Bohemia under their native dynasties). Sure, there was ethnic conflict in the form of anti-Slavic discrimination in German-dominated towns and occasional massacres of German burghers, but that was hardly the whole story, nor a unique phenomenon.
    I always get the impression that you’re projecting the nationality conflicts of the 19th/20th centuries and German expansionism back into the distant past, as a sort of 1000-year struggle of united Slavdom against “the West”. But variants of such views seem to be not all that uncommon in East Central Europe…nationalist Poles have a tradition of making similar arguments, with the 10th century margrave Gero who perfidiously slew Elbe Slavic chieftains at a banquet figuring as a sort of proto-Nazi. I suppose the big point of contention would be whether it’s merely Germany or the entire West (whatever that may be) that’s unchangingly bad and how to position oneself in relation to Russia.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    , @Beckow
  312. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    closer to the original IE Aryan tribes who spread to Iran

    Origin theories about Slavs having more “pure Aryan origin” from the Bronze Age is not relevant for how Slavs and Germanic tribes were in central Europe after the collapse of the Roman Empire – which is not very different from their neighbors in all directions, including religion and deeper structure in language. You can try to distinguish the especial differences between Norse and Slavic gods for me, if you like.

    that Ukies are pure, they never mixed and definitely were never touched by anything from Asia

    West Ukraine was the origin point of Slavs in the time of the end of the Roman Empire. So West Ukraine can claim to be the “tribal homeland” for this language in relation to the first millennium.

    When tribes immigrate to new areas in the first millennium, they didn’t displace population like peoples in modern European colonialism of the New World, but change the dominant culture and language of earlier populations, which are assimilated to the ruling tribe.

    So, ancestors of modern Yugoslavia’s population, will include mostly Illyrians. In Northern Russia, there is the ancestry in preslavic population (the same groups that are described in the chronicles).

    Your odd attempt to blame it on ‘communists‘ is part of the mental otherness, it is quite comical. You should

    There is nothing “odd” or “comical”. Slavic Catholics in 19th century Prague would not be “non-Western”, while Dacians in 19th century Romania would be viewed as “non-Western”. Even though, Romanians were in earlier history Latin origin people.

    Trying to draw the specific dividing line of Slavic speaking populations from Western culture, was easy in the second half of the 20th century, because there was de facto panslavism of all slavic speaking people having communist governments, all aligned (except for Yugoslavia) from Moscow. These dividing lines change fast, so that today Poland and Czech Republic are Western countries, with only their communist history viewed by Westerners as exotic. Nobody is viewing the Catholics of 19th century Prague as exotic and non-Western, but there is the communist decades they cannot relate to with their own historical route.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  313. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    The vaccine mandate, critical race theory atmosphere, and acceptance of trans individuals have lowered morale and really hurt recruitment. Howevever in terms of reduced combat power what does it amount to? 1%? 2%?

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    , @A123
  314. @china-russia-all-the-way

    However, in terms of reduced combat power what does it amount to?

    The most recent example of the combat power of US troops is Afghanistan. Thing is, for combat you need troops prepared to get wounded or die. Expensive toys, even if they are good, cannot compensate for the lack of dedicated soldiers.

  315. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Beckow

    Iraq and Syria would be a theater of the land war in its first stage.

    Leaving the quotes below to add context for the discussion.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/16/us/politics/iran-nuclear-program-tehran.html

    Israel’s defense minister, Benny Gantz, took both American and Israeli government officials by surprise in mid-May when he decided to make Israel’s assessment public. “During these very days, Iran is making an effort to complete the production and installation of 1,000 advanced IR6 centrifuges at its nuclear facilities, including a new facility being built at an underground site near Natanz,” he said. The Iranians did not dispute the claim: they had announced, a year ago, that they would build new facilities in response to Israeli attacks.

    The 60 percent level of uranium enrichment is just short of what is needed to produce a weapon, and as Iran has amassed quantities of it over the past several months, the estimates of how long it would take to get fuel usable for a bomb have dwindled to weeks. Still, American officials also continue to believe that Iran has not taken steps to build an actual weapon — though Israeli officials express doubts.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  316. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    movies are for stupid people who can’t read

    You remind me, I still need to see this “Zhivago” film by David Lean. Mr Hack said I had to watch it during the coronavirus lockdown and I have not remembered. Many people said the film is more enjoyable than the original novel, which I’m sure I will never read. But why is a film necessarily worse than a book?

    It seems like saying “painting is worse than poetry” or “music is worse than sculpture”.

    Surely, the different art form, is not directly comparable. I would say the important thing is your experience. You can have a good experience watching a film, you can have a bad experience reading a book, vice-versa.

    In potential, books can contain more information, can engage more your imagination. Perhaps, books have higher potential, especially for complex story. But in practice, if you have a couple hours, you might have a better time with a good film than a bad book.

    Film is also just a very different art, based mainly in surrealism and creating simple dream images. Whereas the literature from the 19th century, is usually more effective for realism and complexity. Film can be very time-efficient, as you can relax for an hour and half, then it is finished and you can go back to work. While books usually require multiple hours.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  317. Jimmy1969 says:
    @Jimmy1969

    0. It would be over in 1 day and Iran knows that. And big boy..I once attended a lecture by an old retired Israeli General who stated with shrugged hunched shoulders: we do not really care if Iran goes Nuclear…that is just political posturing from world Zionists….Iran knows that we can wipe them out 100 times worse than they can wipe us out. Iran has most of its industry and population very densely concentrated….boom boom big guy.

  318. Jazman says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Cant stop laughing , joke is perfect reflection of Ukie victories

  319. German_reader says:
    @Dmitry

    I was exaggerating somewhat, it’s just that I’ve gotten out of the habit of watching movies, don’t really see the point for me personally.
    I guess one could make an exception for classic movies from the 1930s to 1980s, they’re historically interesting by now and often have genuine artistic merit. Mainstream cinema seems to have devolved into total trash though over the last 30-40 years…does Hollywood produce anything but woke propaganda and entertainment for imbeciles like those superheroes movies nowadays? European film industries also seem to be pretty dead compared to the 1950s-1970s. I suppose one could look for something better from non-mainstream or non-Western sources, but that’s too much effort for me.

  320. Jazman says:
    @AP

    “You copy-pasted your information from some Russian nationalist website so who even knows if it is accurate. ”

    It is official document nothing is from nationalist website . There is document called Instructions for Ukrainianization . Commies screwed up many things and what we see now it mistakes of communism

    In fact, no impassable abyss between communists and Ukrainian nationalists has ever existed. The only thing that was required of the latter was not to take an anti-Soviet position. Those of them who did not take such a position made a dizzying career in the Soviet state apparatus, specializing mainly in Ukrainization. The supplier of personnel for this was Eastern Galicia, which at that time was part of Poland. In one of his letters, one of the founders of the “Ukrainian alternative history” genre, Grushevsky, treated kindly by the Soviet authorities, wrote that “about 50 thousand people with their wives and families, young people, men moved to the Ukrainian SSR from Galicia. Many Galicians work in the apparatus of the People’s Commissariat for Education of Ukraine. Yavorsky worked in Ukrnauka ( Ukrainian Science comissariate ), K. I. Konik, M. L. Baran; A. I. Badan-Yavorenko, and then Zozulyak, were the scientific secretaries of the Narkompros (People’s Commissariat of Education ) Skrypnik’s personal secretary was a Galician N.V. Yerstenyuk.

    In the ranks of such migrants there were also about 400 officers of the Galician army, defeated by the Poles, led by G. Kossak, the uncle of Zenon Kossak, who became the author of the 44 rules of life of the Ukrainian nationalist. That is why it is time to finally make solution for fake country Ukraine .

    • Replies: @AP
  321. @Matra

    Second Heimat was good too.

  322. @German_reader

    European film industries also seem to be pretty dead compared to the 1950s-1970s.

    As I remember, there were pretty decent French and Italian movies in the 1980s. I remember one good German comedy (the title escapes me). Now Italian TV is even stupider than Mexican. It’s not just Hollywood and the Empire: Europe is moving downhill faster than those two. As one Russian TV personality put it, “we are gonna miss you”.

  323. German_reader says:
    @Matra

    For some reason Germany has punched below its weight in cinema and TV

    It’s a profoundly boring and intellectually sterile country…which makes the steady descent into dystopian conditions even more bizarre.
    I haven’t seen Heimat, surprised you liked it, didn’t think it would have much appeal outside of Germany. I remember Timothy Garton Ash criticized it for anti-Americanism, a manifestation of Germany’s dark anti-Western soul.

  324. @German_reader

    It’s a profoundly boring and intellectually sterile country

    I disagree with “intellectually sterile”. I collaborated with five different German labs and taught a graduate course in Germany (in English). I found Germans, professors and grad students, quite smart. I also had several DAAD RISE summer undergraduate students from Germany. Some of them were remarkably smart. Four earned authorship on papers.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
  325. Mikel says:

    When you see the Russian Telegram channels indulging day after day in the display of impressive Russian military hardware and other types of military porn, you know that nothing much is happening at the fronts.

    After the fall of Mariupol and Popasna it looked like the Russian offensive in Donbass was acquiring a new impetus and some territorial gains did occur but I gather from both Russian and pro-Ukraine channels that they came at a huge cost in manpower for both sides, also for the Russians and LNDR conscripts. It feels like the Russians don’t quite know how to continue their Donbass campaign.

    I don’t doubt that Russia has some formidable conventional weapons. Their long and medium range missiles have proven to be about as accurate as their Western counterparts, more or less, and they seem to have huge stocks, as well as massive artillery firepower but Russia looks unable to translate all that hardware into actual military gains against an inferior opponent. Also, the fact that Russia tried but clearly failed to achieve air supremacy over all of Ukraine, which would have probably changed the course of the war, as they would now be bombing targets at will, including Western weapon deliveries, shows that their Air Force capabilities were very overrated.

    Speaking of which, this war is also taking its toll among some famous Russian bloggers who spent years extolling the virtues of the Russian military. The Saker collapsed shortly after the start of the war and has been in a health-related pause since then, with his blog being managed by other people. He was supposed to be back at the end of July but right now his website http://thesaker.is/ is down, which is a pity because the great Fred Reed (no idea why he chose such a venue!!) had began posting there occasionally. And now Colonelcassad has also confessed to being emotionally burned out (Google translation) and his channel is also being managed by his moderator with many less updates than in the previous months.

    Martyanov does continue pontificating from his website and hilariously pretending that everything that is happening validates his predictions. What a clown. I never read his book, often promoted at this website, but I feel embarrassed to admit that I did download it from libgen. Those who bought it should demand a refund.

    Anyway, Russia might find a way to conquer all of Donbass one way or another (apparently there is a drive to recruit volunteers in different parts of Russia but they also seem to be doing that with scarce competence, as the lost technicians and professionals are not being replaced) but it’s hard to see a way for Russia to go any further than that. Unless maybe the Ukrainian army gets decimated in the Donbass campaign but the Ukrainians, no doubt with massive Western assistance, have managed to conduct themselves rather professionally, even when losing ground. Hence the stalled situation after the fall of Lysichansk.

    • Thanks: German_reader
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  326. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack

    He must be one of those “Ukro-Nazis” that Putler is rallying against.

    Oh, you bet. And, no, he doesn’t have qualms about many things. But then, tbh, he’s really just looking out for his own. He has good composure, too, given what’s going on.

    [MORE]

    with the one that Bandera is known for

    Stepan’s hair is ok. What is more interesting about him though is the look in his eyes, it’s a bit intense and piercing.

    Btw, here’s another good one for you – “a good will gesture”. When the Russian troops leave from parts of Ukrainian soil, they rationalize that with “we’re just showing a good will gesture”. This is the running joke on Ukrainian Youtube now. Let’s hope for more good will gestures to be shown in the near future.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  327. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    I agree it partly depends on a historical period and your interest in it.

    To access arts of the 1930s-1990s, then cinema is essential, as the film was a dominant visual art of the 20th century, while there was less energy going to literature and painting had been displaced (by photography) and became an elite culture only, theater was displaced by cinema itself.

    Whereas if you want to enjoy arts of the e.g. 19th century, then you need books, theater, orchestras and paintings.

    They are also non-comparable arts. Cinema since the 1910s, is always presenting surrealist dream images. Cinema was always a kind of hypnosis. Novel from the 19th century, was designed for your brain to recreate a kind of psychological realism, with complex characters, descriptions of society and politics.

    Directly, there cannot be good novel converted to a film, as the information is very different. But there can be good films which are inspired by the atmosphere of a novel.

    cinema seems to have devolved into total trash though over the last 30-40 years…does Hollywood

    Until the end of the 20th century, Hollywood films were still embedded within American culture, but in the last couple decades they become international products, which generate most of their income outside America. So they became quite a culturally non-specific.

    I think “woke politics” is possibly even less than in film than in the other arts today (as they do not have an elite audience, while “woke politics” is most popular with the elite), but this century profitable film became fungible international consumer products, which are designed to lowest common cultural denominator of their diverse markets.

    Hollywood films are especially dependent on the Chinese market which generates the most revenue for American film studios. This is why often they focus on things which are easy to translate between cultures, like “Superhero films” which you can sell in different languages, whether China, probably soon India, without needing a specific culture in the audience.

    . I suppose one could look for something better from non-mainstream or non-Western sources,

    I think the best films of the 21st century were mostly Hollywood, even as they are a minority of the Hollywood films, as the European and Japanese film industry seemed more exhausted. Whereas in the 1950s, you would say many of the best films were made in Japan or even Italy.

  328. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    A defence line that was eight years in the constructing was breached. The speed at which heavy artillery and the many tons of ammunition it eats can be moved is limited. There is no reason to think Russia cannot continue through the other fortification lines. at however great a cost. Ukraine cannot freeze this conflict, only get a better ratio of attrition. The Ukrainian strategy is to wait for the Russian leadership to give up. But even if it wanted to, ending the war without capturing all Donbass, and Odessa too maybe would entail accepting a catastrophic decline in Russia’s prestige.

    The Ukrainian strategy is to wait for the Russian leadership to give up. But even if it wanted to, ending the war without capturing all Donbass, maybe Odessa too, would entail accepting a catastrophic decline in Russia’s self perceived prestige by failing to levy war unto the bitter end. The international perception of Russia having determination and relentlessness would be things of the past and the ramification of that is what is the point of having nuclear weapons. if everyone thinks there is evidence you probably lack the hard driving implacability to use them in the last resort? That becomes even more important if your military forces have been bested by a medium sized country. No conceivable occupant of the Kremlin would or could see failing to achieve military victory in Ukraine as an option.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  329. Matra says:
    @German_reader

    I’ve been hearing for years, going right back about two decades, that Timothy Garton Ash is a ‘glowie’ – an intelligence operative within media & academia. No idea if that’s true but I know he’s allergic to any kind of nationalism, even hints of it. Maybe Heimat was too distinctively German for him thus giving him chills.

    Philip Owen – Until recently I didn’t know about the second Heimat. I’ve never found any options of watching it on any devices, just the overpriced (hundreds of dollars) DVD set on Amazon.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  330. German_reader says:
    @Matra

    I’ve been hearing for years, going right back about two decades, that Timothy Garton Ash is a ‘glowie’ – an intelligence operative within media & academia.

    One can certainly wonder how he got to be a professor, his academic output is pretty meagre after all, high point seems to have been those travel books about the Eastern Bloc he wrote in the early 1980s (maybe that could also point to some sort of involvement with intelligence services).

    he’s allergic to any kind of nationalism, even hints of it.

    He’s on record that he’s looking forward to global racial mixing, the entire world becoming like Brazil (or what he imagines Brazil to be). An unironic proponent of the Kalergi plan one might say.

  331. German_reader says:
    @Dmitry

    I think the best films of the 21st century were mostly Hollywood

    Can you give some examples? I can’t think of a single Hollywood movie produced this century that I’d be interested in.

    • Replies: @Yahya
    , @Dmitry
  332. @German_reader

    does Hollywood produce anything but woke propaganda and superheroes movies nowadays?

    Broaden your horizons.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eeb_Allay_Ooo!

    Though I suspect songbird might enjoy it more.

    • Thanks: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Barbarossa
  333. German_reader says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Thanks, but that sounds pretty depressing. I’d rather watch some cheerful Bollywood musical. Or a war movie where Pakistan gets thrashed.

    • LOL: Thulean Friend
  334. @German_reader

    It’s just sentimental nonsense, movies are for stupid people who can’t read anyway.
    Do you also watch soap operas?

    Well, I never said if I liked Dr Zhivago or not – all I said was that it was 6th most successful film in history, and this just proves that people love Russia – because there is no way they would go to watch some similar story set in Poland, Greece , Italy, or Sweden etc

    As it is, I like the film and consider it very good – but Bridge of the River Kwai and Lawrence Arabia ( films by the same director) are much better. I can see why you are implying “sentimental nonsense”, maybe even partially agree with you, but that “sentimental nonsense” is probably what made it appealing to female audience and explains why it did better financially than those 2 (superior) films that are more male-orientated.

    People also love to watch movies with Nazis in them. Or horror movies. Movies about Russia with its endless succession of disasters probably satisfy the same sort of craving.

    Bridge on the River Kwai, though the objective is reached , ends in a total disaster…but that did not make it more popular film than Doctor Zhivago.

    There was a big stream of pro or neutral to USSR Hollywood films during detente-era that were very financially successful, so the Nazi analogy is wrong I would say. Germans don’t have to be Nazis to be dickheads so that cinema audiences want to see them incinerated………..look at the film Die Hard – it could only work with Germans

    People just naturally love Russia! These detente era films often have Russia/USSR as clean, nothing about bad houses and long queues, nothing “Mongol” about the people, and the USSR government and military are presented as trustful .

    I haven’t seen it but I know Warren Beatty did a very successful film about the revolution called “Reds” ( oscar best Director award) that is pro-USSR.

    “From Russia with Love” was a very successful film and very natural title. Imagine if it was called “From Poland with Love”?….western people would have assumed it’s a snuff film and refused to watch it – shot themselves through the mouth to escape watching.

    Movies about Russia with its endless succession of disasters probably satisfy the same sort of craving.

    Russia is a huge, wonderful success of a country – triumphing after each of these disasters with long periods of endless success and not “endless succession of disasters”. How does it make sense to use this phrase of “endless disasters” when for the last 500 years we have conquered huge amounts of land and become the biggest country with endless amounts of military success? There seems to have been plenty of western productions about Catherine the Great recently – and her reign can’t be associated with anything else except constant success and making Russia great. As you know, she was German, as were other Russians monarchs and plenty of germans or Russians of german descent played big roles in Russian military, politics, sciences, architecture , engineering and art etc. Every video rejoicing at Crimea coming back to Russia features the iconic Swallow’s Nest- a building created because of a German commissioning it., History shows that Germany fails atrociously when not working well with Russia.

    Anyway, on the “disaster” issue – the Germans were responsible for two of these disasters against Russia as you fully know, so maybe show more respect – 3 disasters if you include the Finnish Civil War where the Finnish sadists relied heavily on German intelligence and finance ….4 if you include the sending of Lenin and subsequent civil war as their action

    We have had our problems of disasters – defeat by Japan, various (minor) uprisings, purges, big casualties in both world wars, civil war, various famines, talented people exiled to the caucasus or Siberia , the Tsar’s family being murdered, beautiful churches being detonated…….but this is far outweighed by all the successes.

    But this is my point – Russia succeeds despite everything working against them, Poland FAILS despite everything in their favour – as they are useless losers at elite level. This constant feature of history is going to occur again ( is occuring again)

    All western rulers have had some wackjob advising or close to the leader…….but its only historically Rasputin that people have been fascinated by ( and not so much his disastrous ending)

    Do you also watch soap operas?

    lol-NO…….and I never will or would watch .

    It’s just sentimental nonsense, movies are for stupid people who can’t read anyway.

    Probably some level of truth in that comment……but its not as if Russia has not exported great high culture around the world.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Dmitry
  335. @Yellowface Anon

    If Pelosi was to put her plan of visiting Taiwan into action (desite apparent warnings from the American military)

    Good cop/bad cop routine.

    The US establishment just pretends to be agonising over her visit. In recent months, a series of “formers” have visited Taiwan; the latest was ex-DefMin Mark Esper. Pompeo has been agitating about recognising Taiwan for months if not longer.

    Just like Biden, Pelosi is stage-managed and choreographed. The US clearly wants to up the ante with China, while simultaneously wanting some amount of plausible deniability. Zhongnanhai smart enough to see through the act, hence the harsh words. Let’s see who blinks first.

    • Agree: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
  336. So much for the “Great Bifurcation”, LOL.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  337. @Dmitry

    What the hell are you talking about?

    Directly, there cannot be good novel converted to a film, as the information is very different. But there can be good films which are inspired by the atmosphere of a novel.

    Some of the best films ever made were a good novel, converted to a film. Sometimes even a mediocre novel was converted into a great film of epic proportions – like The Godfather.

    A few notable examples.

    The Name of the Rose, The Shawshank Redemption, No Country for Old Men, Forrest Gump, Angel Heart, Misery, The Green Mile, and Perfume: The Story of a Murderer.

    These are at least as good as the books they were based on, if not even better.

    Then, there were great Soviet films, like Solaris and Stalker, and TV series like The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

    An excellent Russian adaptation of another Strugatsky brothers’ book is The Ugly Swans.

    There is no such novel that could not be translated into a film. There is no such novel that could not be surpassed when adapted for the screen. Some of these films have a score that is a piece of art in itself.

    And there are a lot of good European, Japanese and Korean films, that people don’t know about.

    Audition is a great thriller, based on a book. One of the most impressive recent movies was a Korean horror The Wailing.

  338. German_reader says:
    @Gerard1234

    but its not as if Russia has not exported great high culture around the world.

    Certainly, and many people have a lot of regard for that high culture, but claiming that everybody naturally LOVES Russia is quite the exaggeration, especially right now.
    And what’s with your constant comparisons to Poland…really obsessive.
    But interesting that you’re able to write comments without copious insults, quite the surprise.

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
  339. AP says:
    @Jazman

    Those of them who did not take such a position made a dizzying career in the Soviet state apparatus, specializing mainly in Ukrainization. The supplier of personnel for this was Eastern Galicia, which at that time was part of Poland. In one of his letters, one of the founders of the “Ukrainian alternative history” genre, Grushevsky, treated kindly by the Soviet authorities, wrote that “about 50 thousand people with their wives and families, young people, men moved to the Ukrainian SSR from Galicia. Many Galicians work in the apparatus of the People’s Commissariat for Education of Ukraine. Yavorsky worked in Ukrnauka ( Ukrainian Science comissariate ), K. I. Konik, M. L. Baran; A. I. Badan-Yavorenko, and then Zozulyak, were the scientific secretaries of the Narkompros (People’s Commissariat of Education ) Skrypnik’s personal secretary was a Galician N.V. Yerstenyuk.

    None of this contradicts what I wrote (that Ukrainianization simply matched Ukrainian-language instruction to the ethnic Ukrainian population, and that the Ukrainian language still lagged in terms of circulating literature), and most of these Galicians were killed in the 1930s.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  340. @AP

    Ukrainianization simply matched Ukrainian-language instruction to the ethnic Ukrainian population

    Now, that is certainly untrue. I encountered the results of Ukrainization in Lugansk. We had obligatory classes in Ukrainian language and Ukrainian literature in school. The literature class was particularly ridiculous: we had a class in Russian literature at the same time, which made the comparison inevitable. To put it charitably, Ukrainian literature does not rise above one tenth of Russian in volume, and considerably less in quality: not a single Ukrainian writer rose to the level of Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky (to name just two of at least half a dozen top-tier Russian writers). The language would be OK, if it weren’t obligatory in a city where hardly anyone spoke Ukrainian. In the class of 40+ kids I was the only one who could speak decent Ukrainian (because I was born in Lvov, lived ~5 years nearby, and communicated with local kids in Ukrainian). All other kids mangled it beyond recognition. When I was in the first or second grade, the last school in Lugansk with Ukrainian instruction closed, as they could not find kids willing to be taught in Ukrainian. Yet as Lugansk officially was in the Ukrainian SSR, everyone was forced to take these classes.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Wokechoke
  341. A123 says: • Website
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    The vaccine mandate, critical race theory atmosphere, and acceptance of trans individuals have lowered morale and really hurt recruitment. However in terms of reduced combat power what does it amount to? 1%? 2%?

    Much More.

    Dying for “The Big Lie” that “Biden Won” is an absurdity. Everyone in the military sees The Blue Coup placed illegitimate Not-The-President Biden in the White House. Orders will be followed in the most self-survival manner. Forces that rely on NCO initiative, notably Marine Corps, will move very slowly.

    Regardless of what the NeoConDemocrats want, the criminal White House occupant is fundamentally limited. Walking into General SJW Milley’s Afghanistan Withdrawal Trap has fundamentally undercut officer and enlisted confidence in both the flag ranks and the Lobotomite-in-Chief.

    Gen. SJW Milley’s willingness to expend the lives of 13 American soldiers to undermine the presidency is so mind bogglingly treasonous, I still have trouble believing it happened. This will be hard for even a patriotic MAGA President to fix. A huge chunk of current flag rank ‘leadership’ will have to go.

    The best solution would be trying, convicting and executing Gen. SJW Milley. However, going for this and not obtaining the conviction would be disastrous.

    PEACE 😇

  342. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    There are 15 Ukrainian dialects, who said that one of the is supposed to dominate the others – your Galician quasi-Nazis?

    When the Ukrainian language was standardized it was based on a specific dialect (which is how languages are typically standardized) – that of Poltava (number 4 on your map). This was chosen by people like Panteleimon Kulish who were not Galicians (he was from Sumy) and who preceded the Nazis by decades. Poltava was probably chosen because it was the purest Ukrainian ethnic province (other ones had many Poles or Russians) and had been the home of the first major Ukrainian-language writer Kotlyarevsky.

    If Galician had been the basis of standardized Ukrainian, the language would have been very close to standardized Rusyn.

    There has never been one standard version of Ukrainian spoken everywhere. Like any other language it has local variations.

    By standardized I mean the literary language that is taught in schools and printed in newspapers and books. Most countries including Ukraine has one.

    You speak an outdated local dialect

    Many in the diaspora do, but my family were careful to stick to literary Ukrainian, which was used in Soviet Ukraine until 1933 and Galicia until 1939. It helped that one of my grandparents was from central Ukraine.

    “The alphabet whose users created arguably the world’s greatest prose literature probably didn’t need to be improved.”

    Well, if you say that your Russian isn’t good enough to comment on it, then you have probably read this arguably the world’s greatest prose in translation

    Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are generally considered to have been the world’s greatest novelists. Chekhov among the world’s greatest playwrights.

    Somehow the old alphabet didn’t interfere with their production.

    The original, genuine Dostoevsky is practically unreadable. His Russian is ugly. The others so-called great Russian authors are the best in the history of boredom.

    So says the guy who sincerely believes that Bob Markley is a musical genius.

    As for the orthography, reading anything in the older style is cumbersome and loaded with letters that are pronounced the same but written differently

    You are used to the simple ways made for Sovoks.

    During my time in the Soviet Ukraine most girls were keeping virginity before marriage. This wasn’t done out of religious considerations

    You claimed to have been in Soviet Ukraine, which was the least Sovietized part of Ukraine. A western Ukrainians are religious.

    No one could have imagined that Ukrainian ladies were going to turn into prostitutes, filling the brothels around Europe and the Middle East. But that’s what happened once the Soviet morality had been abolished.

    No, that’s what happened when the Soviet morality was no longer constrained by a police state. It was exactly Soviet morality. As soon as rules were lightened a little, still in Soviet times, you had Маленькая Вера, and then the 1990s debauchery, whose prostitutes and customers were people raised in the USSR with a Soviet moral view of the world.

    Purest expression of Soviet morality and high culture, attitude towards women, priests and Christianity (you reflect the latter in your post), etc.:

    Within Ukraine, the most Sovietized part of the country was also the one most involved in prostitution – Donbas.

    Don’t take my word for it – here is an expat newspaper columnist in Moscow:

    http://www.exile.ru/articles/detail.php?ARTICLE_ID=7573

    “Lola, my whore, came from Severodonetsk, a toxic dump in the Lugansk oblast, the Russified east of Ukraine.I rented her late on Sunday, November 28th — the same day that the Ukrainian governors of several pro-Yanukovich regions were holding a congress in Severodonetsk, threatening to create a breakaway southeastern Ukrainian republic if the “orange” revolution in Kiev succeeded. It was one of those coincidences that writers invent to give a sordid story some relevance — but invention in this case isn’t necessary. We’re talking about whores here, folks. Any john in Moscow knows that Yanukovich country, the pro-Russian southeast of Ukraine, is the snapper-basket of Europe, the white world’s most fertile breeding ground for whores, the Golden Triangle of prostitution production.”

    A language cannot be standardized. The rules of grammar, spelling and orthography can change, but it doesn’t change the language

    By standardized language I meant the literary standard taught in schools, and printed in most works. People may speak in dialects but there is still a standardized language. The result of having one, however, is that dialects often weaken.

    “He [W.R. Rishi] might not have been familiar with Ukrainian, or even Polish.”

    He is a linguist, he doesn’t have to be familiar. He can open a vocabulary and a book on grammar and compare the similarities and differences.

    How do you know that he considered relatively obscure languages such as Ukrainian or Lithuanian? Did he actually name them?

    “The Indian language came from the North, their upper castes are distantly related to Slavs.”

    The Aryans spoke Sanskrit, and they came from the North, the uppermost caste of the Brahmins has been preserved ethnically pure due to the regulations, with very low number of mixed marriages. Up to 75 percent of the Brahmins belong to the R1a haplotype.

    Sure, and they also mixed with locals – otherwise they would completely resemble Slavs, and they do not, though there are clear similarities, such as in facial features.

    The Aryans went south and the Slavs went west, for a reason that remains a mystery. But they weren’t exactly of the same ethnic group, considering the linguistic differences. Apparently, both peoples had lived close to each other and the Slavs had been influenced by the more advanced culture of the Aryans, before the split-up

    They were probably the same or nearly the same (as Ukrainians, Russians and Poles) at the time of the split. My R1A on a basic level has counterparts in Punjab. At the time of the split there was no “advanced culture.” It was probably all like the remnant pagans in the most isolated valleys in Pakistan, rather primitive. These people weren’t literate before they left.

    “The Ukrainian neo-pagans worship Dazhboh. President Yushchenko’s wife grew up in a Ukrainian neo-pagan family.”

    Dumbass, neo-Nazi, fake and reconstructed bull crap.

    The ancient Slavs celebrated the solstice days. That requires understanding of cosmology. Ask any of these neo-pagan idiots what a solstice is – they have no idea.

    I don’t know about those neo-pagans but Ukrainians in general celebrate Ivana Kupala which falls on or near the Solstice. We used to make bonfires, girls would make wreaths.

    “Christianity brought civilization to the Eastern Slavs. Instead of worshipping crude sticks they built cathedrals, schools, hospitals.”

    Christianity maybe brought some civilization to the Germanic peoples. For the Greeks, the Romans and the Eastern Slavs it was a catastrophe.

    Christian Byzantium was better than pagan Rome. Europeans in general ruled the entire world when they were still devout Christians, no other people had managed such a feat.

    The early religion of the Slavs wasn’t idolatrous, the sticks were brought by the Varangians, it was their thing. The entire pagan pantheon was of the Nordic origin.

    Those sticks were found even in Slavic areas where Vikings didn’t go. And while the Varangians (including Rurik) were mostly Norse some Slavs went along with them.

    Yet the land where the Varangians traveled was called in their chronicles Garðaríki – the land of towns, because the Varangians were still living in villages and didn’t know how to build of stone, whereas the Slavs had seven towns built of white alabaster.

    LOL, you must believe this fairytale:

    Slavs lived in small fortified towns.

    And what hospitals are you talking about, if the first introduction to the concept of medicine the Christians encountered during the late Renaissance,

    You must think that your Soviet fairytales are true reality.

    https://classicalwisdom.com/culture/history/christianity-and-the-rise-of-the-hospital-in-the-ancient-world/

    The first hospitals were built in association with Christian basilicas. They were part of the Churches efforts to help the poor, which was a religious obligation. Local bishops were the driving forces behind these institutions.

    [MORE]

    There is no agreement on who built the first hospital, but it is claimed that Leontius of Antioch built one between the years 344 to 358. At around the same time, possibly with the support of the Emperor, a deacon was placed in charge of the hospitals in Constantinople. This would suggest that hospitals run by Christians had been established even earlier than the mid-4th century AD.
    These hospitals proved to be very popular with many, especially in urban areas. By the end of the 4th century there were a vast number of hospitals run by Christians throughout the Empire, but primarily in the Eastern provinces (a reflection of the fact that these provinces were more Christianised and also wealthier). Saints such as Saint Sampson and Basil of Caesarea (Saint Basil the Great), both built hospitals in what is now modern Turkey.

    After the Fall of the Western Roman Empire, the evolution of the hospital continued. In the West, monasteries provided basic health care to the poor and dying. However, in the Byzantine Empire, the successor state of the Roman Empire in the East, there was a large increase in the number of hospitals.

    The Byzantine Emperors bestowed lavish sums on the Church, and this meant that extensive hospitals were built that offered in-patient care and had even departments for those with different afflictions and diseases. These Early Byzantine hospitals would go on to greatly influence the development of medical facilities in the Muslim world.

    Christianization was a catastrophe for Europe, it ruined the culture,

    LOL, Sovietism at its finest. And Bob Marley was a genius!

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  343. AP says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Ukrainianization simply matched Ukrainian-language instruction to the ethnic Ukrainian population

    Now, that is certainly untrue.

    I was writing about the 1920s.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  344. Mr. Hack says:
    @siberiancat

    The information that you’ve led me to promises that the first phase will include about 1,000 new “houses” that are slated to be completed by this autumn. They all look exactly alike and remind of the socialist aesthetic of the past (I wouldn’t be surprised if Beckow purchases one and is one of the first to move in):
    https://ria.ru/20220701/mariupol-1799520099.html
    So this is what the “liberation” was really all about? Imagine how block after block of these slum like dwellings will look like in 20 years? Thanks, but no thanks!

  345. @German_reader

    the minister of the interior (a hardline “antifascist”) has already preemptively stated that the protests against inflation and rising energy prices (which haven’t even gotten off the ground to any substantial extent so far) will be exploited by far right extremists, so the security services have to be prepared.

    Are people so stupid that actually buy that or do they just pretend to believe it? It beggars the imagination that people are so dumb, but to be honest many would swallow it here too; hook, line, and sinker.

    It does seem that there is more skepticism/ pushback of the woke agenda in the US, sometimes from surprising directions. At a recent gathering I got into conversation with a group of folks from the local art school. The group was quite far left, but they were quite unsparing in their complete derision of woke BS virtue signalling. I could hardly have heard a more bitter lambasting from a bunch of Trumpers.

    They could see that woke was used as a pretext for failing/ incompetent teachers to prop themselves up, was purely empty rhetoric, and was primarily used as a power grab/ consolidation. I shared the description which I’ve heard elsewhere that, “Woke is office politics by other means”, bastardizing the Von Clauswitz quote. They quite enjoyed that.

    This one heavily facially pierced bitter black woman was particularly (and colorfully) expressive in her derision of the woke university management, relating how black male classmates were aggressively sidelined and competent male teachers and staff were pushed aside by the female dominated art department. She also found it quite insulting how the art history prof. made up nice woke sounding BS about black artists from past decades in an attempt to track well.

    It was all quite amusing to me. They were definitely not my normal crowd to socialize with but we had a fine time bashing wokeness over some bourbon. I wouldn’t agree with them about much else, but it illustrates how fractious the woke left coalition really is. It should be amusing watching it come unglued as I think it is ultimately untenable in the long term, especially as the more existential concerns you site start to take more mental bandwidth.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  346. Wokechoke says:
    @AnonfromTN

    It’s like arming the Gaelic Connaught region and making them in charge of Dublin.

  347. Wokechoke says:
    @Barbarossa

    Woke is HR Bitches By Other Means.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  348. @Thulean Friend

    Now you know…this is the kind of stuff that will get people accusing you of being some kind of a covert Indian again…

    • LOL: Thulean Friend
  349. Wokechoke says:

    Little Kate…

    Looking at the history of Rockets in War we see the Congreve, the Kayusha, the V2 and the Scud v the Cruise Missile. We now see the HIMARS.

    Katyusha is the most interesting one. War winning weapon by all accounts. Was originally an Air to Air rocket that the Russians realized was perfect for cheap artillery strikes. Germans hated the thing. We shall see what the HIMARS can do. What effect did it have in Syria where it first appeared? have any documents been generated crediting it with a win for Anti-Assad Forces?

  350. Mr. Hack says:
    @Sean

    The international perception of Russia having determination and relentlessness would be things of the past and the ramification of that is what is the point of having nuclear weapons. if everyone thinks there is evidence you probably lack the hard driving implacability to use them in the last resort? That becomes even more important if your military forces have been bested by a medium sized country. No conceivable occupant of the Kremlin would or could see failing to achieve military victory in Ukraine as an option.

    Russia lost its luster of invincibility in Afghanistan, and left that country with its tail between its legs. And let’s face it, Ukraine is a much bigger deal than Afghanistan ever was, on many planes. Also, Ukraine has garnered much more support than Afghanistan with direct support from Nato countries and the US, Australia, Canada and more, not to mention moral support from other countries too. Just today, the Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei visited Ukraine and met with President Zelensky and offered all of his moral support for Ukraine during these difficult times. The use of nuclear weapons in Ukraine would be the ultimate capitulation to insanity that Russia could be guilty of performing, setting it back internationally for many, many decades.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @Sean
  351. @Emil Nikola Richard

    Joscelyn Godwin has put multi-man-years-labor in translating the work of Julius Evola. He is a dangerous man!

    No doubt, dangerous indeed! Evola is a fascinating character. My overall impression is that while I’m sympathetic to many of his perspectives he takes matters to unnecessary extremes. Excesses in one direction (modernity) breed excesses in reaction (Evola), I suppose.

  352. @Mr. Hack

    Russia lost its luster of invincibility in Afghanistan

    Join the club, USA. I guess they are even on that count then.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  353. Mr. Hack says:
    @Barbarossa

    Any other areas that I may not be aware of?

  354. @AP

    You are becoming increasingly boring.

    As soon as rules were lightened a little, still in Soviet times, you had Маленькая Вера, and then the 1990s debauchery, whose prostitutes and customers were people raised in the USSR with a Soviet moral view of the world.

    Very poor argumentation.

    You, in your wonderful country, as soon as rules were lightened a little, had Linda Lovelace and her Deep Throat, and it happened to enter the top 10 of highest-grossing films.

    So what’s wrong with Маленькая Вера?

    Purest expression of Soviet morality [Сектор Газа] and high culture, attitude towards women, priests and Christianity, etc.

    No.

    Purest example of Soviet people, learning to be like you. But even the most outrageous Soviet punk rockers could not match yours. Nobody in the Soviet Union or in Russia has ever defecated on stage.

    Unfortunately, YouTube has banned most of his videos. No better quality is available. There used to be a documentary about him, where he ate his excrement on stage as well. And his real name was Jesus Christ Allin.

    Look it up.

    You are used to the simple ways made for Sovoks.

    And you are not speaking in a Shakespeare style either. As a matter of fact, your English is very poor, the same as your arguments, especially considering that it’s your native tongue.

    You claimed to have been in Soviet Ukraine, which was the least Sovietized part of Ukraine. A western Ukrainians are religious.

    That’s a good illustration of the aforementioned.

    My city was in the region where they speak a western dialect, but it was not in Galicia. Very few people in the city were somewhat religious. Most were secular, did not go to church.

    Most were not baptized.

    Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are generally considered to have been the world’s greatest novelists.

    Of the 19th century, perhaps.

    Anyway, most people simply don’t have a taste, and most of those who do have a bad one. According to The Atlantic magazine, the best novel of the 20th century is Lolita.

    So, generally considered is another poor argument. You are good at them.

    Europeans in general ruled the entire world when they were still devout Christians, no other people had managed such a feat.

    The Mongol Empire was the greatest in history, the Muslim caliphate was enormous as well, the Greek had a great empire.

    And this is a strange argument in defense of Christianity, given that they slaughtered most of the population of Mesoamerica and South America, and ruined entire cultures.

    Christianity is a diabolical cult of death.

    Ukrainians in general celebrate Ivana Kupala which falls on or near the Solstice.

    No it doesn’t and they don’t.

    Christians had to incorporate the existing pagan traditions into their own, in order to spread a new religion without encountering much of resistance.

    The summer solstice celebration was connected to John the Baptist birth, and the winter solstice to Christmas, but since then the solstice dates have shifted and Christians do not celebrate them on the correct dates, and have no idea what a solstice is.

    Yet if the ancient Slavic tribes were aware of such a phenomenon it indicates that they either were very intelligent and knowledgeable and knew some astronomy, or more likely had adopted this knowledge fragmentarily from another people.

    Since no other traces of such esoteric knowledge, apart from these celebrations, has ever been found among these tribes, it’s logical to assume that the people who composed the Vedas were the source of it, because we know that they were connected.

    How do you know that he considered relatively obscure languages such as Ukrainian or Lithuanian?

    He said no other language, but Persian, that is, no other but Persian. There is an entire field of comparative linguistics, it’s easier to do than you imagine.

    Slavs lived in small fortified towns.

    Small compared to what – Los Angeles?

    From the 9th century, Smolensk, Murom, Rostov, Novgorod and other towns were built of stone. Most towns had a kremlin.

    The first hospitals were built in association with Christian basilicas. They were part of the Churches efforts to help the poor, which was a religious obligation.

    Read your own reference.

    Asclepeion were temples for worshiping Asclepius, but at the same time they were the first known hospitals in the history of western civilization. There were approximately 320 hospitals in Ancient Greece.

    And my point was not hospitals but actual medicine, which the Europeans knew very little about.

    Sovietism at its finest. And Bob Marley was a genius!

    Of course, he was.

    You still haven’t told me who and why in your unhumble opinion should be considered a musical genius; apparently you don’t have an opinion.

    • Replies: @AP
  355. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    It was Gorby who withdrew from Afghanistan. I very much doubt whether he would have withdrew from Ukraine, even if he wanted to he’d not have been allowed to. The withdrawal from Afghanistan was in furtherance of a new much better relationship with the West, which Russia is no longer pursuing. There is no way for Ukraine to meaningfully win, because the level help necessary to drive them back would provoke Russia into doing something silly. I think America has already decided to cap the supply of arms at a fraction of the Ukrainian win level (30 HIMARS has been mentioned as the limit of what might be given rather that the 100 that might reverse Ukraine’s fortunes) , Ukraine is not like Britain in WW2 at all, the US was trying to provoke Germany into all out war.

    The use of nuclear weapons in Ukraine would be the ultimate capitulation to insanity that Russia could be guilty of performing, setting it back internationally for many, many decades.

    It could be a battlefield tactical use with would kill a few thousand legitimate military targets. Anyway, the threat if explicitly made would have to be taken seriously by the US. Right now America has the level of Russian losses it wants, which is just enough yet nowhere near too much. Russia is being schooled as to it limitations in relation to the West and America’s ability to deter it, however those limitations cease to exist if Russia loses its temper and even by an explicit official threat steps onto the nuclear escalator. To paraphrase the old saying about owing banks, if you are Ukraine and holding Russia to a stalemate that is Russians problem, but if you are trouncing Russia then that is your problem. And your backer the US’s. The strategy of America is keep this at a certain sweet spot level indefinitely , which is over time going to result in Ukraine suffering irreparable losses. in order to hurt Russia. America is barely breaking a sweat. Serious mistakes have been made by both Zelesky and Putin in underestimating the other’s countries. They ought to compromise for the good of all including themselves. Standing on principle will result in the slow destruction of Ukraine, and the geopolitical relegation of Russia is not going to make it any less of a threat to Ukraine after this war ends. Ukraine would have to be permanently mobilised.

  356. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Sean

    Hack conveniently (from the prism of his delusional preferences) ignores that upon the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan, the pro-Soviet Afghan government remained in power for a noticeably longer period than the US supported governments in Afghanistan and South Vietnam, after the US left.

    As for bringing Ukraine into a geopolitical comparison with the aforementioned situations, Russia-Ukraine have much more in common than the US-South Vietnam, US-Afghanistan and USSR-Afghanistan. The latter involved Russia and Ukraine as part of the same entity.

    I disagree with the suggestion that Russia is getting schooled more than the Kiev regime and Western governments. America has serious issues that are getting downplayed by having Russia as a political football. This matter is even more so regarding Germany, the UK and some others.

    Simple common sense might eventual prevail within Kiev regime controlled Ukraine – something that would be to the detriment of the neocon, neolibs and svidos.

    Concerning the US and Russia-Ukraine, Obama got it right in his interview with Jeffrey Goldberg.

    • Replies: @Sean
  357. @Yellowface Anon

    enough talk. Get on with it. I want Taiwan knocked over before the midterms. Trump better not have to deal with this nonsense when he gets back.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  358. @china-russia-all-the-way

    They see a full scale attack by the US on the horizon

    No they do not. While I’m sure that Iranians consider an Israeli/Saudi attack to be possible (if unlikely), I’m confident that they are dismissive of a potential US attack. Now when Trump gets back in, yeah a US attack is theoretically possible, but there is 0 chance with Biden at the helm. The US military is disintegrating by the day and is in no shape to attack Iran now, and will be in even worse shape in several years. An attack on Iran would be a gargantuan logistical undertaking and the current US military would be unable to handle it.

  359. @Here Be Dragon

    Russians who grow up in the West are white but the Russians I’ve spoken with who are actually from Russia are so un-Western in their mindsets that I am unable to regard them as whites

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  360. china-russia-all-the-way says:
    @Greasy William

    If Iran makes substantial progress on the bomb and delivery system within 2 years, do you think the Biden administration would simply allow Iran to continue? What options short of full scale war would the US have to get Iran to stop its nulcear program? What if Iran truly is on the cusp of gaining a nuclear deterrence? I think it would be completely unacceptable to Israel and the US. In that scenario, I think it’s likely that the US goes to war against Iran.

    The US military is deteriorating. It has not disintegrated (which I would define as a sizable fraction of combat power disappearing in the last 2 years) I dislike carelessly imprecise language. It makes discussions like this pointless. The US Army projects missing its recruitment goals this fiscal and next by 10,000 and 28,000 respectively. Hundreds of fighter pilots are grounded because of insurbordination against the vaccine mandate. That’s all very bad.

    It would be exaggeration however to call it disintegration. As a percentage, in your opinion, what do all of the bad developments of the last 2 years for the military amount to in terms of lost combat power (US military in 2020 as reference)?

    • Replies: @Max Payne
  361. Coconuts says:
    @German_reader

    I always get the impression that you’re projecting the nationality conflicts of the 19th/20th centuries and German expansionism back into the distant past, as a sort of 1000-year struggle of united Slavdom against “the West”.

    If it had its origins in the Bronze Age and the Steppe Herder migrations, it would be a 3500+ struggle. There would have to be some genetic determinism involved?

    It seems like the sort of predictions a theory like this makes are implausible; e.g. that Swedes would find Finns and Latvians more other than Irish and Navarrese, or that the Germans living beside Poles, Wends, Czechs would find them more other and foreign than Welsh speakers or the inhabitants of the Papal states.

    But there were those Soviet narratives from the Cold War that all Western states were capitalist, therefore imperialist, therefore like German Fascists (Nazi doesn’t seem to have been as popular a term then) and the Marxist-Leninist position became enriched with some nationalist and Panslavic themes after 1945 as Dmitri mentioned. So it looks like a successor theory in this tradition.

    The Aryan element adds some spice as people like Edouard Drumont (this is from La France Juive) wrote things like this about the difference between ‘Aryans’ and ‘Semites’ and it makes Aryans sound cool:

    ‘The two races are doomed to come into conflict, because of both their qualities and their shortcomings. The Semite is mercantile, covetous, scheming, subtle and cunning. The Aryan is enthusiastic, heroic, chivalrous disinterested, frank and trusting to the point of naivety. The Semite is earth-bound with scarcely any concern for the life hereafter; the Aryan is a child of heaven who is constantly preoccupied by higher aspirations. One lives in the world of reality, the other in the world of the ideal.

    The Semite is a business man by instinct; he is a born trader, dealing in everything imaginable, seizing every opportunity to get the better of the next man. The Aryan on the other hand is a peasant, a poet, a monk and above all a soldier. On the battlefield he is really in his element as he happily affronts danger and braves death.’

    • Agree: German_reader
    • Replies: @German_reader
  362. Mikhail says: • Website

  363. Yahya says:
    @German_reader

    Can you give some examples? I can’t think of a single Hollywood movie produced this century that I’d be interested in.

    I mostly enjoy watching Hollywood movies for the sightseeing. Even if you dislike their political messaging, you have to admit no-one else does cinematography the way they do.

    In the 21st century, off the top of my head I can think of “Dunkirk”, “Darkest Hour”, “Kingdom Of Heaven”, “Life Of Pi”, “The Two Popes”, “The Hateful Eight”, “True Grit”.

    [MORE]

    Some marginal movies are quite good as well and you can easily find them on Youtube and watch them for free.

    The Band’s Visit (Israeli):

    The Seventh Companion (Russian):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TySDka0_6R4&ab_channel=M%C5%82odyBaron

    A Christmas Carol (British):

    The Battle Of Algiers (Italian):

    • Thanks: German_reader
  364. Sean says:
    @Mikhail

    The worse Ukraine does the more HIMARS and longer range rockets, real time targeting information and things previously ruled out, like the Patriot missile defence system is for now, they will be supplied with. You have not noticed this reaction to Russian gains; do not think what the US has eked out to Ukraine has slowed Russia’s advance down at all? A Russian victory of sorts is probable but it will be a very costly if not Pyrrhic one. The US has barely broke a sweat supplying Ukraine so far; if the UAmerican objective was to supply Ukraine with the wherewithal to drive Russian forces back, then the US could have, but it is obviously considered too dangerous. The Ukrainian capabilities are being ratcheted up very carefully and will continue to be until they stop the Russians and begin imposing a unsustainable attrition ration on them. It will take months.

  365. Mr. Hack says:
    @Sean

    It was Gorby who withdrew from Afghanistan. I very much doubt whether he would have withdrew from Ukraine, even if he wanted to he’d not have been allowed to.

    But he did ultimately allow Ukraine to leave Russia’s tight grip over it, by dissolving the Soviet Union. Gorbachev (and even his wife Raisa, if I’m not mistaken) would never be involved in anything so hideous as what Putler is doing within Ukraine, as he had a well developed sense of nostalgic respect for Ukraine, as his ancestors included settlers from Ukraine that had moved to Siberia.

    I think America has already decided to cap the supply of arms at a fraction of the Ukrainian win level (30 HIMARS has been mentioned as the limit of what might be given rather that the 100 that might reverse Ukraine’s fortunes) ,

    I don’t think that anybody knows the limits of US military support to Ukraine. It seems to change, day by day. And other countries are also providing heavy artillery and other needed weaponry to fend off the huns from the north. These weapons have included the U.S. M777, French CAESAR, German PzH 2000 and a few other towed and self-propelled long-range artillery systems. More drones are being added to Ukraine’s arsenal too, still very effective weapons to be used at a closer range. Slovakia has also promised to provide up to 30 planes as has the US too, with its aging F-16’s. The addition of warplanes is something new, not being discused a month ago. The “sweetspot” that you write about seems to be getting wider day by day.

    Ukraine would have to be permanently mobilised.

    Most assuredly. How else can you deal with an adversary that has just recently shown its trustworthiness by bombing ports in Odesa one day after signing agreements that it would help maintain unmined free zones to help foster the transit of grain to countries on the verge of starvation?

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Sean
  366. @Sean

    The US has barely broke a sweat supplying Ukraine so far

    Four EU government leaders have fallen since March. The US barely breaking a sweat is because they are stupid.

    More governments to fall. Germany and France too if everybody keeps on straight ahead.

    The pope seems to be doing alright.

    • LOL: Barbarossa
  367. German_reader says:
    @Coconuts

    The Semite is earth-bound with scarcely any concern for the life hereafter

    That’s a pretty strange accusation to make against “Semites”, given the origin of the great monotheistic religions in Semitic cultures. Maybe an echo of the more traditional distinction drawn between the importance of rules for everyday life in Judaism and Islam and the insistence on belief in Christianity (orthopraxy vs orthodoxy).
    I agree with your analysis of the Slavdom against “the West” theme. I just find it surprising that it still seems to be persuasive to quite a few people, despite all the EU integration. But maybe that’s not even an entirely bad sign.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
    , @Coconuts
  368. German_reader says:
    @Greasy William

    Trump better not have to deal with this nonsense when he gets back.

    Is there any reason to believe his 2nd term would be less disastrous than the first? And given how toxic his image is, can he even win?
    I’m unsympathetic to US Republicans in general, but maybe they should pick DeSantis or some other guy instead of Trump.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    , @A123
  369. @AP

    I was writing about the 1920s.

    Don’t know about that period, even my parents were little kids by the end of 1920s. I know first-hand 1960s and 70s, by which time the results of Ukrainization were grotesque. This comedy became a tragedy after 1991, and a bloody tragedy after 2014. It is about to end, though.

  370. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    …. Slavic Catholics in 19th century Prague would not be “non-Western”

    You mean all ten of them? Prague has not been a ‘Catholic’ city for a few hundred years. Regarding its Western orientation, it has always been split. Until the 1960’s, Prague had a lively and strong local Slav flavor. From the second half of 19th century until 1920’s the culture was much more eastern as a conscious balance to the surrounding German culture.

    What has made Prague more pro-western was the expulsion of Germans after WWII – it led to the usual yearning combined with regrets. But it is still mainly an intellectual thing, most commoners are still quite level-headed, esp. outside of Prague.

    “Communism” was a surface thing that had little to do with it: neither the Czech national struggle, nor the existential fight with Germany or the resulting expulsion of Germans were ‘communist’. The commie system between 1948-89 stabilized the already created situation: there was very strong demographic and economic growth, culture flourished, people became complacent. Your silly ‘commies did it’ mantra is an infantile stereotype. By the way the commies were almost all Czechs, there were 1.5 million of them and nobody held a gun to their head, it was part of the zeitgeist.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  371. Can you give some examples? I can’t think of a single Hollywood movie produced this century that I’d be interested in

    The only one from this century that I can think of is The Ring which is not only the best horror movie ever made but is one of the greatest films of all time, regardless of genre. Go watch it right now if you haven’t seen it already. Never Back Down is enjoyable to watch with friends in that it is just so unbelievably corny and bad. Although I never saw them, the Kill Bill films seem to have been positively received and Tarantino’s 90’s stuff was great.

    Other than that, no, I can’t think of anything. Lot’s of good stuff from the 80’s and 90’s that still holds up, even if it isn’t as epically awesome as it was back then.

    90’s Hollywood really was something else: Batman Returns, The Crying Game, Terminator 2 (best action film ever, IMO), The Nightmare Before Christmas, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, Aladdin, The Lion King, Pocahontas, Austin Powers, American History X, Gladiator, Fight Club, The Shawshank Redemption, The Naked Gun 2 1/2 and The Naked Gun 33 1/3, Loaded Weapon, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, There’s Something About Mary, Election, Se7en, The Sixth Sense, Speed, Clueless, The Matrix, Fargo, Clerks, Mallrats, Beavis and Butthead Do America. And that’s not even counting the movies that are totally retarded in hindsight but were fun at the time like Point of No Return (there were tons of films just like this in the 90s).

    • Replies: @German_reader
  372. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    …projecting the nationality conflicts of the 19th/20th centuries and German expansionism back into the distant past, as a sort of 1000-year struggle of united Slavdom against “the West”

    The struggle on-and-off did last for 1000 years, neither side was united. German eastern expansionism was often very conscious – documents from 13. or 17th century are quite explicit, in 19.-20.th century it became consolidated to a policy level.

    You say that I ‘project’, but you ‘understate’ – it was not that minor. You are right that similar Germanic drives happened against Ireland and Scotland. But that is water under the bridge – the Western appetites for the east are still going strong. The idea of grabbing Ukraine – you know the Nato, bases, etc..- makes no sense unless there is still this residual desire to control the east.

    Remove Russia from the situation in Ukraine, Baltics and EC Europe – let’s pretend there is no Russia with its resources and size. Once you do that it is obvious that there would be little interest in getting that region into Nato, bases in Ukraine, creating new elites. It would be a backwater and nobody in Washington or Brussels would get excited about minorities – it is the fact that they are Russians that has created the crisis.

    A crisis happens when two sides have opposite goals – the goal of the West in Ukraine is to create a staging ground against Russia. Without that obsession none of this would be happening – ipso facto that shows that the Western desire to ‘go east’ is still there, the defeat in WWII has not extinguished it. They just tried to hide it until the war started, now it is very public.

  373. @German_reader

    Trump would beat the Pedo-in-Chief by 6 pts if the election were held today. The economy, border and crime are only going to get worse over the next 2.5 years. And as bad a candidate as Biden would be in 2024, all the Dems other options are even worse.

    Desantis is alright but I’d prefer him for VP. I don’t trust Desantis as much as I do Trump and I really want to spite all the anti Trump people.

    • Replies: @A123
  374. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader

    Is there any reason to believe his 2nd term would be less disastrous than the first?

    Trump’s first term was not disastrous. However, there were limits on what could be achieved solely with executive power. Much of the MAGA agenda was functionally opposed by:
        • Non-MAGA House
        • Non-MAGA Senate
    He could not obtain House appropriations and lost ~1/2 his cabinet appointments horse trading those seats for Senate confirmations.

    There will almost certainly be a MAGA House after the midterms. That means appropriations for priorities such as border security.

    Due to 6-year Senate terms there probably will not be a full MAGA Senate for some time. Swamp creatures like McConnell and Cornyn will not come up again until 2026. However, the body will be much friendlier and fewer compromises will be required.

    And given how toxic his image is,

    Trump is not toxic to American voters. The J6 propaganda hearings have completely failed to scare Americans.

    Toxic is a good term for Biden-flation. The unelected White House occupant is *loathed* by the American people.

    can he even win?

    MAGA has been working the ground game at the state level improving election security. Low-IQ #NeverTrump yahoos will have much more difficulty fixing the election.

    Maybe they should pick DeSantis or some other guy instead of Trump.

    Given his age, Trump may chose to step aside. However, he is still head of the MAGA movement. Unless a health issue turns up, there is no plausible Republican challenge to deny him the nomination. DeSantis has made it clear he will not run in the GOP Primary against Trump, and plans to serve another term as Florida Governor.

    A key advantage of Trump receiving his 2nd and final term is the ability to wield executive powers, such as pardons, with out the need to worry about re-election. Also, the 2024 economy will still be tumultuous. The term-limited Trump can make bold decisions for MAGA Reindustrialization that will be quite controversial in some circles.
    ____

    MAGA is a permanent political realignment. Desperate, self delusional Leftoids calling it “Trumpism” will be psychologically crushed when the movement keeps rolling after the end of Trump’s 2nd term.

    The gradual CCP decoupling process will take multiple MAGA administrations to bludgeon down SJW Globalist, pro-MegaCorporation obstructionism. Four years of Trump plus Eight years of DeSantis is a very appealing concept for this vital task.

    This time will also test, prove, and forge, MAGA credentials in the next generation of MAGA office holders. Organic growth & development of talent will make the new MAGA GOP stronger at all levels, and provide a strong “bench” of potential successors that can follow after DeSantis.

    PEACE 😇

  375. @Sean

    Excuse me for interrupting, but while you and Mr. Hack are duscussing the Ukrainian Kool-Aid news for dummies, there are news happening in the real world as well. So, perhaps you will be surprised to learn, that:

    1. The Russian forces have captured the Vuhlehirska TES thermal power station, one of the largest in Ukraine and in Europe.

    It will be now producing electricity for Donbas.

    2. The Russian economy is doing great – much better than before the war.

    Russia’s current account, which measures global trade in goods and services, was strong in the second quarter of this year when its trade surplus rose to a record \$70.1 billion.

    The ruble, too, has exhibited remarkable resiliency, ranking as the strongest performing currency so far this year, rising to its highest level against the euro since 2015.

    Sanctions Are Hurting the West More Than Russia
    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/sanctions-are-hurting-west-more-russia-203784

    3. Meanwhile Ukraine has been selling itself.

    Three large American multinationals bought 17 million hectares of Ukrainian agricultural land.

    These are Cargill, Dupont and Monsanto. Five percent of Ukrainian agricultural land was subsequently purchased by the Chinese state. For comparison, the whole of Italy has 16.7 million hectares of agricultural land.

    Three Large American Multinationals Bought 17 Million Hectares of Ukrainian Agricultural Land
    https://www.australiannationalreview.com/lifestyle/three-large-american-multinationals-bought-17-million-hectares-of-ukrainian-agricultural-land/

    It basially says that about 30 perent of Ukraine has been sold to the US.

    Слава Україні!

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
    , @AnonfromTN
    , @Mikel
  376. A123 says: • Website
    @Greasy William

    Desantis is alright but I’d prefer him for VP. I don’t trust Desantis as much as I do Trump and I really want to spite all the anti Trump people.

    Both Trump and DeSantis are Florida residents. Due to the way the Electoral College is formed under the 12th Amendment, Trump would have to sacrifice all of Florida’s Electors to place DeSantis on the ticket.

    Unless Trump changes state of residence (again), there is no chance DeSantis will be VP.

    PEACE 😇

  377. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    But he did ultimately allow Ukraine to leave Russia’s tight grip over it, by dissolving the Soviet Union. Gorbachev (and even his wife Raisa, if I’m not mistaken) would never be involved in anything so hideous as what Putler is doing within Ukraine

    Gorbachev was forced to dissolve the Soviet Union, he did not “allow” it.

    I know people who knew Gorbachev quite well, personally and professionally. He was bad.

    He was not an idiot as a person, but cunning. However, he was a malignant narcissist and his efforts were primarily driven by need for personal power and vanity rather than for the good of the country (this contrast between brilliant personal success in terms of arising from humble origins and grasping power over the country, while being bad for the country he has taken over, provides some comparison to Stalin, or Putin if this invasion of Ukraine fails).

    Gorby wanted to be a JFK and for Raisa to be his Jackie. His reforms provided him with the adoration of much of the world but failed at home, and when it looked like his rule was failing he had no qualms whatsoever about throwing reformers under the bus and getting in bed with hardliners, who overthrew him. Gorbachev did not feel bad at all about sending tanks and killing people in the Baltics and the Caucuses. He would have killed far more people if doing so had enabled him to stay in power. Could he have been a Stalin, willing to kill millions? Probably he was not so monstrous. But he would have easily been capable of killing thousands or even tens of thousands as Putin has done, if he had been in a position to do so and if doing so would allow him to stay in power.

    Gorby’s mistakes led to freedom for many peoples so he is understandably viewed by them with a certain warmth and gratitude, but he was not a good man and in many cases the positive effects of his rule occurred in spite of him and not because of him.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  378. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    It basially says that about 30 perent of Ukraine has been sold to the US.

    Better 30% to the US than 20% to Russia. Without the US, Ukraine would end up a colony of Russia’s again, instead of an autonomous country. Actually, Russia’s real aims are to totally destroy Ukraine, which is untenable to a majority of Ukrainians.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  379. @German_reader

    An echo of the more traditional distinction drawn between the importance of rules for everyday life in Judaism and the insistence on belief in Christianity.

    Actually, during the early 18th century most of the traditional Judaism turned into Chassidism, embracing Kabbalah instead of the Talmud. The importance of rules is no longer emphasized in most of the Hasidic communities.

    Currently there are two branches that are still extensively studying the Talmud, one being the Lithuanian school and the other Chabad. Unfortunately, the Chabad sect is now the most influential and widespread.

    Chabad promotes the most outrageous and chauvinistic ideas, and radicalizes everybody in their orbit. At the same time the teaching of Chabad is conflicting with the most important principles of the tradition.

    This sect is etremely malicious and should be globally banned.

  380. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    The Russian forces have captured the Vuhlehirska TES thermal power station, one of the largest in Ukraine and in Europe

    Have they? They have been fighting over it for a month, it was mostly destroyed after some direct hits in June and will not be producing power for anybody.

    Three Large American Multinationals Bought 17 Million Hectares of Ukrainian Agricultural Land
    https://www.australiannationalreview.com/lifestyle/three-large-american-multinationals-bought-17-million-hectares-of-ukrainian-agricultural-land/

    Impossible, because foreign ownership of land is illegal in Ukraine. They just have long-term leases and are investing in plants and facilities.

    Thanks for confirming that you follow this kind of source:

    https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/australian-national-review/

    In review, the Australian National Review promotes pseudoscience such as anti-vaccination and anti-gmo propaganda. In addition to these, they also publish conspiracy theories such as those involving ChemTrails. In many cases, they source to other conspiracy and pseudoscience websites, such as the Food Babe and Natural News. In general, this is a strongly rated conspiracy and pseudoscience website that is low for factual information

    Failed Fact Checks

    “no one has died from the coronavirus” – False

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  381. @Greasy William

    Russians who grow up in the West are white but the Russians I’ve spoken with who are actually from Russia are so un-Western in their mindsets that I am unable to regard them as whites.

    Well, you are within your right, but white doesn’t actually mean Western and your opinion is of little interest to anybody.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
  382. @AP

    Have they? They have been fighting over it for a month, it was mostly destroyed after some direct hits in June and will not be producing power for anybody.

    Yes they have.

    The plant has been damaged but will be restored.

    Foreign ownership of land is illegal in Ukraine. They just have long-term leases and are investing in plants and facilities.

    One again you are showing that you have no clue in anything.

    The moratorium on the sale of agricultural land is lifted in Ukraine
    https://www.osw.waw.pl/en/publikacje/analyses/2020-04-01/moratorium-sale-agricultural-land-lifted-ukraine

    The Verkhovna Rada (Ukrainian parliament) passed the Act on introducing an agricultural land market in Ukraine on 31 March at the second reading. The document envisages that the moratorium on the sale of agricultural land will be lifted on 1 July 2021.

    The act concerns the 41.5 million ha of land covered by the moratorium. The vote took place in the presence of President Volodymyr Zelensky, who had previously appealed to the deputies to back the bill.

    The truth about corporations taking over Ukrainian agricultural lands
    https://global.ilmanifesto.it/the-truth-about-corporations-taking-over-ukrainian-agricultural-lands/

    The moratorium on sales, which the US State Department, IMF and World Bank had repeatedly called to be removed, was finally repealed by the Zelensky government in 2020, ahead of a final referendum on the issue scheduled for 2024.

    An analysis by Open Democracy published in October revealed that ten private companies controlled 71 percent of the Ukrainian agricultural market, including, “in addition to the Ukrainian oligarchy, multinational corporations such as Archer Daniels Midland, Bunge, Cargill, Louis Dreyfus, and the Chinese state-owned company COFCO.”

    According to the Oakland Institute’s latest report on the subject, the list now also includes multinational corporations such as Luxembourg-based Kernel, the US holding company NCH Capital, the Saudi-based Continental Farmers and the French AgroGenerations.

    What types of land can foreigners own in Ukraine?
    https://www.asterslaw.com/press_center/publications/what_types_of_land_can_foreigners_own_in_ukraine/

    State-owned land plots are sold by the Cabinet of Ministers subject to approval from the Verkhovna Rada (the Ukrainian Parliament).

    Municipally-owned land plots are sold by relevant local councils, subject to approval from the Cabinet of Ministers.

    Ukraine Allows Farmland Sales For First Time Since Independence
    https://www.rferl.org/a/ukraine-agriculture-farmland-economy-/31336984.html

    Ukraine has officially ended a 20-year moratorium on the sale of farmland, hoping to unleash productivity and investment in the agricultural sector.

    The land market opened on July 1, more than a year after Ukrainian lawmakers passed a law lifting the ban on sales, as required to receive a loan from the International Monetary Fund.

    Have a nice day.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Barbarossa
  383. German_reader says:
    @Greasy William

    The only one from this century that I can think of is The Ring which is not only the best horror movie ever made but is one of the greatest films of all time

    That’s a remake of a Japanese movie.

    90’s Hollywood really was something else:

    The films on that list are mostly terrible imo.
    Once saw part of Reservoir dogs and got until the scene where the psycho gangster douses a tied up policeman in petrol and prepares to set him alight. I was so disgusted by the tone of the entire movie that I switched it off at that point. Baffles me how that creep Tarantino gained such a reputation for his meaningless sicko movies.

    • Replies: @songbird
  384. @Here Be Dragon

    It basially says that about 30 perent of Ukraine has been sold to the US.

    That’s as far as agricultural land goes. Politically, 100% of Ukraine is sold out to the US. The problem for the Ukraine population is that the US never cared how many aborigines die, as long as that causes problems to their real target, Russia. Ukraine is no more than a tool, and a disposable tool at that, from imperial perspective. Pretty much like Kurds in Syria.

    • Agree: Here Be Dragon
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  385. @AP

    Have they? They have been fighting over it for a month, it was mostly destroyed after some direct hits in June and will not be producing power for anybody.

    Yes, they have.

    From https://t.me/s/boris_rozhin
    Освобожденная Углегорская ТЭС. Уровень разрушений не очень значителен. Работали аккуратно.
    Translation: “Vuhlehirska TES (from now on Uglegorskaya TES) was liberated. The damage is not very significant. They worked carefully”.

    It was apparently captured by Wagner, with the help of DPR and LPR troops.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  386. @AnonfromTN

    PS. Two more things. This source “colonelcassad” is very conservative, reports anything only when there is incontrovertible proof. Those who are not queasy can look at the bodies of killed Ukie soldiers on the territory of Uglegorskaya TES here: https://t.me/s/boris_rozhin

  387. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Foreign ownership of land is illegal in Ukraine. They just have long-term leases and are investing in plants and facilities.

    One again you are showing that you have no clue in anything.

    The moratorium on the sale of agricultural land is lifted in Ukraine

    I am very aware of that. The moratorium was only lifted for Ukrainian citizens, it enabled them to amass larger plots of land which is helpful for investment and development.

    It was never lifted for foreigners.

    Posting more links to dubious sources or to irrelevant information doesn’t improve your case.

  388. @Here Be Dragon

    It seems that your original assertion was overly simplistic but it highlights a real problem.

    From the linked articles it appears that outright sale of agricultural land to foreigners is still banned, though this could be changed in the 2024 referendum. I’m sure the current war will make the selling of that idea easier since “the West is our friend”, to the detriment of Ukraine in the future.

    That being said it seems easy enough that much farmland could and is being de-facto captured by Western multinationals through shell companies and individuals ostensibly Ukrainian. I would assume that once the hoped for loosening of restrictions goes through in 2024 ownership can be seamlessly transferred from the shell companies to the true backers.

    This is the same playbook that the IMF et al practice elsewhere in the developing world so it should come as no surprise.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP
    , @Here Be Dragon
  389. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Politically, 100% of Ukraine is sold out to the US.

    They’re only catching up to you, who sold your soul to America some 30 years ago. I’m assuming that you’re perfectly content living out your days here, otherwise you might consider living out your golden years in Mariupol, where they’re now building homes for interested buyers? Lots of other places to consider living in Russia and Ukraine too. Russia may be difficult, I’m not sure how US funds are transferred in today’s hostile Russian environment? You should be reaching retirement status any day now….

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  390. AP says:
    @Barbarossa

    From the linked articles it appears that outright sale of agricultural land to foreigners is still banned, though this could be changed in the 2024 referendum. I’m sure the current war will make the selling of that idea easier since “the West is our friend”, to the detriment of Ukraine in the future.

    Certainly possible but in that case this would be the choice of the Ukrainian people. I’m not sure how likely it is though, the Chinese would be excluded for sure. Maybe only Western partners would be allowed to buy, but still – nationalists would be opposed, I think the odds of this passing in 2024 would be less than 50%.

    Caveat would be if thanks to massive Western help Ukraine achieves some kind of a decisive and crushing victory by 2024. Jubilant and grateful Ukrainians might be generous in that case, if the West strongly pushes for it. That’s better than Russia just seizing the lands, after all.

    That being said it seems easy enough that much farmland could and is being de-facto captured by Western multinationals through shell companies and individuals ostensibly Ukrainian

    They are leasing that way now, though the largest such enterprise is owned by a Ukrainian.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  391. More fresh news.

    Ukrainian Naftogaz (state oil and natural gas company) officially announced default. Naftogaz won’t meet its obligations on Eurobonds because Ukrainian government forbade it due to lack of funds.

  392. songbird says:

    IMO, the majority of nonfiction published today is just as dumb and woke as the majority of fiction published today. For example, this line:

    “Situated in the heart of England, Leicester has always welcomed outsiders, from Saxons and Vikings, to Romans and Jews, Asians and Africans.”

    [MORE]

    The Romans were so welcome that they had to keep four legions in Britain and even that did not prevent Boudicca’s revolt.

    The Vikings were so welcome that they were massacred on St. Brice’s Day.

    Jews were so welcome that they were expelled by edict.

    Blacks were so welcome that they had race riots.

    Nobody could believe a line that dumb. The authoress is simply writing for the regime, just as has happened for hundreds of years before.

    She is like the guy who praised Richard III while he was king, writing after the Tudor victory that he was two years in the womb, and born with long hair and a full set of chompers, and had to be cut out of his mother.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  393. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    You mean all ten of them? Prague has not been a ‘Catholic’ city

    This claim is implausible. Sources are writing how Prague was majority Catholic even until the second half of the 1920s.

    . Your silly ‘commies did it’ mantra is an infantile stereotype. By the way the commies were almost all Czechs,

    You are very sensitive about people giving communism any responsibility, so pointing to the most important division of Europe in the second half of the 20th century is apparently forbidden.

    Czechoslovakia was part of the Eastern bloc, under communist management. This is the separation of the country from Western Europe in the second half of the 20th century – Iron Curtain.

    After “Velvet Revolution”, Czech Republic joined the Western bloc in geopolitics. But also by the 2020s, it will be more or less similar to Western Europe in the cultural sense.

    Separation of all Slavic-origin countries from Western Europe (in the second half of the 20th century), has been contingent and dependent on the changing alignments, shallow enough to be reversed in a few decades.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  394. Mikel says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    So, perhaps you will be surprised to learn, that:

    1. The Russian forces have captured the Vuhlehirska TES thermal power station

    OK, so now perhaps the effort to approach Artemovsk will be a little less agonizing. With a huge sacrifice Artemovsk and Soledar will possibly follow the fate of Severodonetsk and Lysychansk. But the Sloviansk-Kramatorsk fortified area is still many kms away, not mention the Avdievka and Southern Donetsk impenetrable front.

    Did you honestly expect at the end of February that 5 months later Russia would still be so far away from occupying Donbas?

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  395. @Mr. Hack

    Russia may be difficult, I’m not sure how US funds are transferred in today’s hostile Russian environment

    Don’t you worry, where there is a rule, there are ways to get around it. E.g., very recently hopelessly cucked Canada and Germany violated their own sanctions on Russia to get Nord Stream 1 turbine from Canada, where it was serviced at the Siemens plant, via Germany to Gazprom. As they say in Russia, a rule is like a lamppost: attacking it head-on is useless, but you can get around it on either side.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  396. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    As they say in Russia, a rule is like a lamppost: attacking it head-on is useless, but you can get around it on either side.

    Yeah, you’re right, the Russians have always been slippery SOB’s that are very untrustworthy, always changing their tune. A couple months ago, Lavrov assured the world that Russia was not interested in regime change in Ukraine, today, it’s just the opposite. Things must be really going bad for Russia, if they have to scrape the bottom of the barrel and go looking for weapons in Iran?….

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  397. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    But he did ultimately allow Ukraine to leave Russia’s tight grip over it, by dissolving the Soviet Union. Gorbachev (and even his wife Raisa, if I’m not mistaken) would never be involved in anything so hideous as what Putler is doing within Ukraine, as he had a well developed sense of nostalgic respect for Ukraine, as his ancestors included settlers from Ukraine that had moved to Siberia

    Before being elected leader, to a great extent because he was relatively young, Gorbachev struggled with the repeated failures of Soviet agriculture and need to import grain, which had given the US much leverage. In 1982 Israel’s US supplied planes shot down 88 Migs during a single leaving the Soviets leadership aghast, Two years later, the chief of the USSR’s armed forces was sacked for saying that Soviet system was to blame for the county’s worsening military backwardness. Influenced by Alexander Yakovlev, Gorbachev announced that class war (the raison d’etre of the Soviet Union) was to be replaced with global utility (wellbeing of all humankind) as the objective.

    In 1986 there was a catastrophic collapse in the oil price and the Chernobyl disaster in the Ukraine. Beset by crises, Gorbachev told the Soviet military that there was not going to be any war, and there were other priorities than preparing for it and keeping an expensive army in Eastern Europe. Western leaders assured him repeatedly although privately that Nato would not seek to take advantage in countries that the Soviet Union withdrew from. After an unsuccessful coup by traditional Communist on the Central Committee, against Gorbachev’s leadership of the Soviet Union, the Prseident of Russia, Yeltsin, banned the Communist party in Russia and then took over the Kremlin. It was the Russian federation under Yeltsin acquiring of the administrative authority of the Soviet Union almost instantly directly led Ukraine to make a bolt for the door; Ukrainian declarations of independence came within weeks.

    Russia did not really try and stop Ukraine leaving become an independent country which it did five months later. But absolutely nobody then dreamt that Ukraine might try and join a military alliance that Russia was excluded from, and so was a clearly anti Russian alliance. In his early years as president Putin publicly suggested that Russia join Nato, which was a cautious continuation of Yeltsin’s policy. Putin was annoyed about Eastern Europe. Over the next few years it became obvious that Ukraine wanted to join the West, and to defend itself from Russia Ukraine had the brilliant idea of deterring Russia by applying to join NATO. There was an official NATO 2008 announcement (reiterated in June 2021) that Ukraine would become a full member at some point in the future. A few months later they began using Javelins and drones in combat in Donbass. January 2022: deterrence upgrade complete!

  398. @Mr. Hack

    Things must be really going bad for Russia

    Sure, sure. I guess that the reason Russian ruble is the best-performing currency in 2022, while the EU is panicking. German industrialists just sent Schroder to Moscow in an attempt to prevent the disaster. The US is in the panic mode, too. Alzheimer-in-Chief even called raging inflation in the US caused by his idiotic policies “Putin’s tax”. Many American commenters reacted predictably: “if Putin can introduce taxes in the US, he must be the president; what’s that moron doing in the White House, then?”

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  399. @German_reader

    especially right now

    As I explained before , the “especially right now” has NOTHING to do with current events , but everything to do with bloodlibel German Nazis, Anglo-American pogrom jews and incompetent Polish scum AND the culmination of a 15+ year mass , full-spectrum, co-ordinated western propaganda campaign ( including the corrupt, evil scum german media who were very important in the fake drug scandal that banned many Russians) aimed at using every field to brainwash their plankton populations against Russia. You’re are doing this in everything- high culture, politics, business, sport, cuisine (!!!), faggots and religion.

    Give Polish idiots 1% of the anti-Russian propaganda given to western countries……and the western population are against Poles by about 20x more than they are against Russia now. Give the French about 20% of the anti-Russian propaganda and transplant that to Denmark…..and you will have the French hating Danes. Absolutely the same thing if done from Brits to Americans or vice-versa.

    You idiots will emptily call for “urgent peace negotiation”……..but will not even register the very important fact that 404 murdered one of their peace negotiators during the first week of the war ( that’s without even considering what type of failed, chaotic, hopeless despot country would even have such a guy, who I have never heard of before, being in the group of 7 negotiators for the most important talks in the country’s history, only to kill him anyway)

    Where is your “reader” skills on this? Or on hearing the blatant lie of “unprovoked attack”. If you weren’t a dummy and had basic comprehension skills then you would question the premise of “unprovoked attack” . Or on Ukraine 404 being the bastard product of Russia very kindly DONATING to them EIGHT areas of land from SIX different countries ( something that has no precedent)? You claim to be a reader, but show no skills that a good reader should have…….and are clearly as susceptible to the most simply braindead Hollywood BS , as somebody who watches lots of these stupid films…..as evidenced by the success of the primitive anti-Russian campaign in corrupt NATO media countries.

    Where is your “reader skills” on Russia/LDNR evacuating 200000 civilians from LoC before the war…..but 404 deliberately not doing so, sabotaging attempts to do so, killing their own civilians fleeing and using them as human shields during the first month – mainly for the purposes of creating an idiotic Hollywood fake propaganda image for the conflict that plankton westerners would absorb?

    Or the fact that all this started because a President who was previously elected, but overthrown before he could be properly elected because of alleged “corruption” in the voting …to be replaced by the guy with the US State Department wife who was the worst President in their history , only for the guy who was previously elected but overthrown before he could be sworn in….was then reelected ( or elected?) as President and sworn-in, but before he was sworn-in ,the guy with the US State Department wife who was voted out – then initiated criminal case against his own former Prime Minister and main rival in the election of the guy who was re-elected after being previously elected but overthrown .

    The ex PM of the former President with the US State Department wife and ,main rival of the guy who was elected as President….was jailed – oh FFS I can’t be bothered to complete the rest of this freakshow…..I am not even 8% through the timeline of idiocy.

    But interesting that you’re able to write comments without copious insults, quite the surprise.

    When you give intellectually honest answers or arguments – then I reply without copious insults like I did to your post. Any scum that are intellectually dishonest – I reply as required!

    And what’s with your constant comparisons to Poland…really obsessive.

    LMAO. You have tried this retard tactics with Beckow – intellectually dishonest “argument” and emotive lie insult , but that time it was “obsessed with being against the USA”. You have no intellectual honesty so you try and make a cloud around this – so you make the lie against Beckow, who is not even arguing for country’s to be in military alliance against the US – just for American mafia to not create the disaster they are doing now in Europe or in plenty of countries around the world

    As for Poland, there is nothing “obsessive” you idiot, I mention them because
    1. It’s funny ( obviously germans have no humour)
    2. It’s true
    3. I want to – and will continue to do so.

    I was actually going to do an insult about Sweden and the Titanic…..but I know the audience around here and played to their wishes.

    • Thanks: Yevardian
  400. @AP

    From my limited reading it seems as though the majority of Ukrainian farmland is currently owned by smaller farms and that these smaller holders are being hungrily eyed by larger entities.

    This is hardly a new pattern and is one that has already largely played out here in the US with smaller holders designed out of the agribusiness system. While this may indeed increase “efficiency” narrowly measured in agricultural yield only it is an approach which is very socially disruptive as tight-knit farming communities become economically derelict.

    I suppose one can rationalize that we the people have “chosen” that path, but let’s be frank, it was never really chosen in good faith. The main beneficiaries of such a system string the farmer along with promises of better yields and bigger tractors until the day the farm goes under, obsolete and disposable, crushed under the weight of un-payable debts. Similarly the consumers are sold on promises of cheaper food and greater plenty but when it’s your town which gets washed up it’s just too bad.

    But in any case it’s not as though these issues ever get a fair hearing in the public square when they are being decided. It’s not surprising that actors spanning the globe have their eyes on controlling Ukrainian farmland as its worth is only going to increase.

    the Chinese would be excluded for sure

    Currently it seems that the Chinese and Saudis are quite involved.

    https://www.cofcointernational.com/stories/cofco-around-the-world-ukraine-a-solid-partnership-with-potential-to-grow/

    https://cfg.com.ua/en/about/

    I doubt that Chinese and Saudi investors (or French and American ones for that matter) give many cares about the long term social or ecological well being of Ukraine. They are all, to borrow Dmitry’s term, asset strippers.

    This is not to say that the Russians do not cast similar avaricious eyes at Ukrainian resources, but that Ukrainians would probably be well served to keep their long term self interest very much in mind even in dealing with supposed allies and partners.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  401. @Gerard1234

    I get the impression that you are probably a reasonably intelligent person.

    However, I can’t be bothered to wade through such dense outbursts of vitriol and hyperbole to figure out if there is possibly a worthy point contained somewhere therein.

    If bombastic outbursts are worth it for your own amusement then by all means have at it, but your articulation of ideas would be enhanced by tweaking your style.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  402. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    Can’t remember whether I ever saw the original Japanese movie, but I always thought there was something really alien about the idea of a ghost coming out of a videotape.

    Personally, I like to associate ghosts with old places and not new things, which just feels wrong thematically.

    I suspect that it speaks to the enhanced sense of superstition that the Japanese have. Greatest catalogue of different ghosts and demons, with a few being very modern, like Hanako of the Toilet.

    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/japans-bathroom-ghosts

    BTW, I agree with you on Tarentino.

  403. Dmitry says:
    @Gerard1234

    films by the same director)

    These are films by David Lean, who is famous for landscape photography. “Zhivago” is apparently filmed in Spain so perhaps this visual aspect has to be more restricted, but there is also less funding available than “Lawrence”.

    I haven’t seen “Zhivago”, but a problem is David Lean was not able to attain funding for 70 mm so this later film was 35mm, while some of his early films were 70 mm.

    With 35mm, an artist painting like with less materials, compared to “Lawrence”. But the 70 mm was wildly expensive even for famous film directors.

    “Lawrence” was filmed with 70mm. I also haven’t seen “Lawrence”, but I’ve used the parts of the film to test my OLED television, just to look at the beauty of the image. Even the Sony 2012 restoration of “Lawrence” looks more realistic than real life.

    And this new 4k UHD Blu-ray of “Lawrence”, compressed on two discs, would still not be sufficient to contain half of the original information in 70 mm film. https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Lawrence-of-Arabia-4K-Blu-ray/266975/#Review

    • Thanks: Gerard1234
  404. songbird says:

    IMO, Russians care too much about sports. Probably a shadow effect of the Soviets giving them such emphasis and investing too many resources in them.

    For my part, I would be happy if any country I held a national interest in, however vicariously, was banned from international competition, until the poz is removed with fire and sword.

  405. @Here Be Dragon

    …your opinion is of little interest to anybody

    No. That is false. I am the final arbitrator of who is and isn’t white.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  406. @Gerard1234

    Give Polish idiots 1% of the anti-Russian propaganda given to western countries……and the western population are against Poles by about 20x more than they are against Russia now

    The western populations are not against Russia. I’m not sure what Russian media is telling you, but nobody over here cares about this war except for educated white liberals, less than a fifth of the population. Most people don’t even know that the war is still going on.

    • Replies: @A123
  407. Yevardian says:
    @Barbarossa

    Gerard’s insults are so hyperbolic, blunt and indiscriminate that I actually don’t see how anyone could ever be offended by them. He’s right about the Ukrainian government being a shambolic clique-run mess, a major factor in the invasion was “Zelensky’s” government has been in deadlock for months.

  408. @Yevardian

    Years. They are between a rock and a hard place.

    The Ukraine parliament fistfights are hilarious. The Ukraine infantry dying is not.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  409. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    I haven’t been going to cinema regularly since the coronavirus lockdown, so I’m not the best person to ask. But I was surviving coronavirus lockdown with a very good television, watching the films of the 20th century.

    So after the coronavirus lockdown, I’m a bit knowledgeable about 20th century films. But I’m very lacking watching many 21st century films.

    Before coronavirus, I would say you could go to the cinema around one time every 3 months, and still enjoy a film most times. But there would not be enough good films to go to the cinema every month without mostly seeing bad films.

    Whereas in the 20th century, you could probably be going to the cinema every week and still not want to kill yourself.

    Can you give some examples?

    For example, 2010s Bladerunner, was not necessarily worse than the 1980s Bladerunner? in some ways they used more effort conceptually.

    Similarly, Spielberg’s 2001 “A.I. Artificial Intelligence”, far more wild and strange concepts than his 1980s films like “E.T.” At the same time, it has perhaps less traditional skill than in the earlier Spielberg films (like “Saving Private Ryan” or “Jaws”).

    While I think there is loss of skilled work in the 21st century films compared to the 1990 Hollywood, sometimes the newer films are becoming more detailed conceptually than their 20th century equivalent.

    disgusted by the tone of the entire movie

    I don’t think it is great, but is very distinct from most, as it feels like you are watching theater not film. It’s obvious why they thought he was talented, after he can produce a new kind of film with such a low budget.

    It’s also more moralistic than other films as it shows violence as unpleasant or painful, as most of the film is about a person after shot in the stomach.

    While most Americans (including his other films) show violence and guns as something pleasant.

    @Yahya

    In the 21st century, off the top of my head I can think of “Dunkirk”

    Although this is more supporting Greasy, as if you compare to 1990s “Saving Private Ryan”. It feels like a lot of decline, if the most popular war film of the 2010s is “Dunkirk”, while in the 1990s it is “Saving Private Ryan”.

    @Greasy William

    90’s Hollywood really was something else: Batman Returns, The Crying Game, Terminator 2 (best action film

    There is strong difference in the way the films seem (atmosphere, editing, visual) between the 1990s and 2000s Hollywood, even with the same director.

    So 2000s Ridley Scott film, looks very different to 1990s Ridley Scott film. 2000s Speilberg film, is very different to 1990s Speilberg films.

    It’s obviously related to the employee generations and pension within Hollywood, where a generation of the workers have retired.

    When there is generational retirement in the film industry, then the thousands of skilled workers who contribute to the overall film, have changed.

    Much of the skilled workers in Hollywood, must have retired. Many of the skills (whether cinematography or makeup) will be lost, when there is changeover of employees.

    There was also transition to digital video in the 2000s, which has changed a lot of the aesthetics.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    , @German_reader
  410. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Purest expression of Soviet morality [Сектор Газа] and high culture, attitude towards women, priests and Christianity, etc.

    No.

    Purest example of Soviet people, learning to be like you.

    No, the Soviets lived the life in the 1990s: homicide rate unheard of in Western European-settled countries, epic debauchery.

    But even the most outrageous Soviet punk rockers could not match yours. Nobody in the Soviet Union or in Russia has ever defecated on stage.

    The guy you linked to, “Jesus Christ Allin” or whatever, was unknown in the USA. A very marginal figure whom few people heard of. The fact that you have heard of him and that he came to your mind so easily tells us much more about your own debauched Soviet soul than about the USA.

    On the other hand, Sector Gaza were very popular among kids who had been brought up in Soviet schools and Soviet families.

    There used to be a documentary about him, where he ate his excrement on stage as well.

    This and your previous comments about “throwing poop” suggest that feces is, for some reason, an important theme for you. A reflection of some inner essence, which comes to mind easily and often.

    You are used to the simple ways made for Sovoks.

    And you are not speaking in a Shakespeare style either. As a matter of fact, your English is very poor

    As a non-English speaker you can’t judge.

    The fact is, that the Soviets simplified the Russian alphabet for new Sovoks.

    My city was in the region where they speak a western dialect, but it was not in Galicia. Very few people in the city were somewhat religious. Most were secular, did not go to church.

    You said that yours was a Russian-speaking group, so probably your city was highly populated by deracinated colonists sent into western Ukraine. But presumably the villagers moving in would still be religious.

    Anyways, the important thing is that Ukraine offers an interesting laboratory in that parts of it were more Sovietized than others. As expected, the more Sovietized parts, given their disgusting Soviet morality, would show more expressions of debauchery than the least Sovietized parts.

    For example, compare Lviv to Luhansk:

    Zhytomir and Rivne oblasts in Ukraine are the best place in the former USSR to see the impact of Soviet rule on morals and society. Both oblasts had been part of the Volhynian Governate within the Russian Empire. The 20th century saw a natural experiment be conducted on this Governate. Both oblasts have similar demographic profiles, both are Orthodox, and have the same history until 1919. But in 1919 a “treatment” was applied to what is now Zhytomir oblast but not to what is now Rivne oblast. This treatment was 20 years of Communism, an addiotnal generation. Rivne region was annexed to Poland while Zhytomir oblast became part of the Ukrainian SSR. Both became free and relatively lawless after 1990. Here are the effects of the Soviet treatment on the Zhytomir population’s morality:

    Extramarital birth rate:

    More than double in Zhytomir vs. Rivne (Rivne 45% of Zhytomir)

    Abortion percentage, 1999:

    http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/policy/abortion/ukraine/ab-ukraineo.html

    Rivne 71% of Zhytomir

    HIV rate:

    Rivne 67% of Zhytomir

    Etc.

    Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are generally considered to have been the world’s greatest novelists.

    “Of the 19th century, perhaps.”

    That was the Golden Age of novels.

    “Europeans in general ruled the entire world when they were still devout Christians, no other people had managed such a feat.”

    The Mongol Empire was the greatest in history, the Muslim caliphate was enormous as well, the Greek had a great empire.

    But only European Christians managed to span the globe and conquer 90% of it. The Mongol Empire couldn’t compare, nor pagan Rome, etc.

    And this is a strange argument in defense of Christianity, given that they slaughtered most of the population of Mesoamerica and South America, and ruined entire cultures

    What a surprise, the Sovok repeats Sovok fairytales.

    The Mesoamericans literally worshipped demons and sacrificed 100,000s of people on crude blood-soaked pyramids. The Spaniards freed them from this slavery to demons, taught them to read and write, built beautiful baroque cathedrals out of the crude pyramids, and taught the Natives of America to make beautiful music:

    You must be soiled indeed in your soul to view this process as “ruination of entire cultures.”

    Ukrainians in general celebrate Ivana Kupala which falls on or near the Solstice.

    No it doesn’t and they don’t.

    We used to celebrate it in the diaspora, in early July which was near the solstice. Gogol wrote about it. Did the Soviets kill this tradition, as they did many others in their quest to make the world uglier?

    Yet if the ancient Slavic tribes were aware of such a phenomenon it indicates that they either were very intelligent and knowledgeable and knew some astronomy

    The primitives who built Stonehenge were also aware of such things. People can observe what the longest day of the year is, if they are motivated to do so. They had thousands of years. It does not require brilliance.

    “How do you know that he considered relatively obscure languages such as Ukrainian or Lithuanian?”

    He said no other language, but Persian, that is, no other but Persian. There is an entire field of comparative linguistics, it’s easier to do than you imagine.

    So you do not know if he checked Ukrainian, or Lithuanian, or not.

    “Slavs lived in small fortified towns.”

    Small compared to what – Los Angeles?

    From the 9th century, Smolensk, Murom, Rostov, Novgorod and other towns were built of stone. Most towns had a kremlin.

    That would take a population of perhaps 3,000. As Christians, the Eastern Slavs started to build real cities.

    The first hospitals were built in association with Christian basilicas. They were part of the Churches efforts to help the poor, which was a religious obligation.

    Read your own reference.

    I quoted from it.

    Asclepeion were temples for worshiping Asclepius, but at the same time they were the first known hospitals in the history of western civilization. There were approximately 320 hospitals in Ancient Greece.

    Not really:

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14509111/

    Special attention is paid to the situation in the Graeco-Roman era: one would expect to find the origin of the hospital in the modern sense of the word in Greece, the birthplace of rational medicine in the 4th century BC, but the Hippocratic doctors paid house-calls, and the temples of Asclepius were visited for incubation sleep and magico-religious treatment. In Roman times the military and slave hospitals which existed since the 1st century AD, were built for a specialized group and not for the public, and were therefore also not precursors of the modern hospital. It is to the Christians that one must turn for the origin of the modern hospital. Hospices, initially built to shelter pilgrims and messengers between various bishops, were under Christian control developed into hospitals in the modern sense of the word. In Rome itself, the first hospital was built in the 4th century AD by a wealthy penitent widow, Fabiola. In the early Middle Ages (6th to 10th century), under the influence of the Benedictine Order, an infirmary became an established part of every monastery.

    And my point was not hospitals but actual medicine, which the Europeans knew very little about.

    Byzantine Europeans knew quite a lot:

    http://www.hellenicaworld.com/Byzantium/LX/en/ByzantineMedicine.html

    Arabs learned from them, and modern anti-European atheists such as you and other Sovoks give credit to the Arabs or other non-Europeans.

    “Sovietism at its finest. And Bob Marley was a genius!

    Of course, he was.”

    You still haven’t told me who and why in your unhumble opinion should be considered a musical genius

    It’s banal: Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Schubert.

    If Bob Marley, why not Elvis? Or someone else whom Boomers love, like Mick Jagger?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Here Be Dragon
  411. @Mikel

    Did you expect at the end of February that 5 months later Russia would still be so far away from occupying Donbas?

    Did you know at the end of February about the three row fortification lines completed with thousands of concrete bunkers?

    https://postimg.cc/ZCYdZKjJ

    Did you see this map at the end of February?

    • Replies: @Mikel
    , @Wokechoke
  412. A123 says: • Website
    @Greasy William

    The western populations are not against Russia. I’m not sure what Russian media is telling you, but nobody over here cares about this war except for educated white liberals, less than a fifth of the population

    I concur.

    The bulk of the American population wants to secure *our* borders. Funding Ukrainian aggression against Russian Christians makes no sense.

    Worse yet, there is no hope for Oligarch Zelenskyy’s military. High Tech, small unit products from the MIC worked on defense. However, mounting a major offensive requires different tools and massive man power. I will ask the key question… Again….

    How will Ukrainian troops advance across open ground to recapture Mariupol?

    It would take a well coordinated operation with significant armour supported by mechanized infantry (a.k.a. Panzergrenadier).
    ___

    The smart move for Ukraine would be to negotiate good faith ASAP. Alas, Oligarch Zelenskyy is taking European WEF money to support the Davos/Brussels agenda. He will skip the country before Ukraine capitilates.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  413. @Barbarossa

    It seems that your original assertion was overly simplistic but it highlights a real problem.

    For anybody who actually knows how the things work in Ukraine it should be clear, and completely obvious that the country is currently being sold.

    From the linked articles it appears that outright sale of agricultural land to foreigners is still banned, though this could be changed in the 2024 referendum.

    To random foreigners it is.

    But as one of the references says, state-owned land plots are sold by the Cabinet of Ministers, with approval from the Parliament.

    This basically means that whatever is good will have been sold out before the referendum takes place.

    One has to be extremely naive to actually believe that any of these man-eaters are doing anything in order to help Ukraine.

    They keep the conflict going on in order to bring the prices down and to make the Ukrainian economy dependent on loans, in order to force them to pass the necessary legislations and then to buy out the country for a fracture of the real cost.

    They are doing what they did to Russia in the 90s, except that Ukraine or what remains of it will be sold out in its entirety, including the land.

    Haven’t everybody heard of this guy?

  414. Mikel says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Did you know at the end of February about the three row fortification lines completed with thousands of concrete bunkers?

    I personally didn’t. But I did expect the Kremlin with all its spies, satellites, local informants, moles in the SBU and 8 years of proxy-fighting in Donbas to know what they were going to encounter on the other side of the Donbas frontlines, just a stone’s throw away from Donestk and Gorlovka, where they’re still stuck.

    Did the assaults on Kharkov, Mykolaiv, etc also fail because of unexpected lines of fortifications and bunkers?

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  415. @Yevardian

    Gerard’s insults are so hyperbolic, blunt and indiscriminate that I actually don’t see how anyone could ever be offended by them

    I agree. I just find the style very tiresome and burdensome to parse. I’m not opposed to some good internet trolling, but Sher Singh does it better around here by virtue of his pithiness. Gerard is just too ragefully rambling for his own good, in my opinion.

    As you point out, he does have some good points to make; something I get glimmers of when I bother skimming his comments.

  416. Wokechoke says:
    @A123

    see…

    Poland. They have amassed western tanks and HIMARS.

    • Replies: @A123
  417. @Greasy William

    Well, then you have been dismissed from this position.

    Effective immediately.

  418. @Mikel

    I did expect the Kremlin to know what they were going to encounter on the other side of the Donbas frontlines.

    And what makes you think that they didn’t know? You don’t think that they are stupid, do you?

    Did the assaults on Kharkov, Mykolaiv, etc also fail because of unexpected lines of fortifications and bunkers?

    Apparently, as most other people in general, you do not actually understand how an assault on a city of that size is in reality prepared and perpetrated.

    So far they only really needed Mariupol, so they took it. Anything else has been a tactical necessity. Think about the logistics, like control of the roads – this kind of shit.

    Until Donbas is liberated completely, no other serious assault on any city is possible. But eventually they will certainly go for Odessa, etc.

    They will take it in the end.

    • Replies: @Mikel
  419. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    Generally you choose idiosyncratic views, perhaps Fox News and Ann Coulter supports, but most people view as a bit eccentric.

    Then you argue with kremlinbots, bundle your views to argue with them, to connect opposition to those views with “soviets, Putin supporters” etc.

    Maybe you feel your views were slightly more mainstream, as you found someone with their own unfashionable views to oppose them.

    This allows you to argue like your views are opposition to other unfashionable views. But the reason you can find kremlinbots to oppose them, is only because the majority of the world consider these views you are bundling as eccentric. Most Westerners would have even less sympathy for those views.

    Also, one set of implausible views can be opposed by another person who has their own implausible views in unrelated topics, does not magically transmute those first views to be plausible.

    For example, you would not find the mainstream American historians who believe conquistadors were being “kindly” to people they destroyed. Neither normal Spanish people nor Mexicans.

    If you talk like this to normal Spanish or Mexican people, they could be offended. But Ann Coulter thinks this, so maybe there is audience to agree if you go to a rightwing American context (which is a minority even in America).

    Bob Marley is one of the world’s more popular musicians, so people are fans of him in many regions, not especially from a postsoviet region. Probably you will find more Jamaicans to support Bob Marley. Postsoviet regions are not the center of Bob Marley’s popularity. But in the West, even in a classical music forum, people would be divided between fans of him or not.

    1990s is viewed usually as a postsoviet time in Russia, not Soviet times. So when people want to argue against Soviet times, they would normally look at 1970s or 1980s. Of course, 1990s was a historical result of the 1980s, which was result of 1970s, so someone can argue they are related , but 1990s is not what people normally associate as reference of Soviet times as it’s not a time when the Soviet ideology was ruling. It’s a more unusual claim like someone saying that Robespierre is a reference for France of the Ancien Régime, or the early Soviet time is pinnacle of the Russian Empire.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Coconuts
  420. Dmitry says:
    @Barbarossa

    Ownership can be a problem, especially with owners who might want to sell the assets, rather than investing in them, but Ukraine needed (even before 5 months of being destroyed and bombed) to receive more investment.

    Postsoviet countries have the problem of money exit, not money entry. Local elites remove money from the postsoviet countries (because it is not always such locally secure money), wash the money outside where it becomes “real”, and partially re-insert their money back to the local economy.

    They can re-insert money as it becomes more secure after being washed outside the postsoviet space, when it is anonymized and based in Cyprus. After it has been washed, the money becomes “real”. But locals re-insert the money they store outside in risk averse ways and will rapidly remove it again when there are unstable conditions.

    The problem is the lack of stable property rights in all the postsoviet countries except Baltic states. You have to be a bit crazy or naive to invest in a postsoviet country, as it’s like driving in the highway, when everyone else is driving in the other direction. It’s like in a disaster film, when they drive back to New York (when the zombies or aliens are destroying New York). You were supposed to move your money away from Ukraine/Russia/Belarus to a safe place. Your money is supposed to be in Switzerland.

    After the war, Ukraine will need to be reformed in the legal space.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  421. songbird says:

    I think twitter demands your phone number, only so the government can frag you with a drone, if the need should arise.

  422. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    I wasn’t trying to portray Gorbachev as a “good person” but only that changes did occur during his tenure that led to a loosening up of things. I remember my old Galician “boss” that I worked for as a young man beaming during his tenure telling me about Gorbachev’s Ukrainian roots. His impression was that he would be good for Ukraine. How he knew these things, I never found out, but he was always close to the heartbeat of things related to Ukraine.

  423. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Sean

    Emil made a cogent point on how some in the US establishment are too stupid to not be concerned about American action regarding Russia-Ukraine.

    There’re reports saying US military supplies to Taiwan are compromised, as well as the US’s own arsenal.

    How many Ukrainian military personnel killed, captured and wounded so far? Russia in 1917 was said to be militarily better supplied in 1917 than 1914.

  424. Mikhail says: • Website

  425. Mikhail says: • Website

  426. Wokechoke says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    They’ve got the river basin.

  427. Mr. Hack says:
    @AnonfromTN

    The ruble’s dramatic rise from about \$.01 of the US dollar at the beginning of the war to its dramatic rise today is the result of unforseen circumstances of rising energy prices and Russia hoarding it currency internally and forcing whatever buyers of its oil and gas to convert their currency into the Russian ruble.

    Russian oil is selling for \$35 per barrel less than Brent crude, the international benchmark, reflecting the discount buyers demand for doing business with the nation. “Nobody today would buy Russian oil at \$120 a barrel. And in fact there are plenty of energy buyers who will not buy Russian oil at any price today, whether because of sanctions or because of reputational risk,” he said. “The Russian economy is losing approximately \$200 million dollars a day — or \$70 billion on an annual basis — as a direct result of the war.” What’s more, European nations have vowed to cut their imports of Russian gas by two-thirds this year — a potentially crippling blow given Russia’s dependence on energy exports. One sign the Russian economy remains under severe pressure is that inflation in Russia is more than double the rate in the U.S. That’s creating pressure for Russians to move their money out of the country, said Frankel of the Harvard Kennedy School. “The temptation to get assets out of Russia, for Russian citizens to find a way around the controls … will grow, especially with the inflation rate now as high as it has shot up,” he said. Likewise, Russia’s default on more than \$100 million in interest payments to foreign bondholders over the weekend is another sign of its growing international isolation. Russia had the funds to make the scheduled payments, but the U.S. Treasury Department has blocked the country’s ability to service its debt through American banks.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/russia-ukraine-ruble-currency-russian-economy-sanctioms-2022/

    No other country in the world has managed to build its fortune on a policy of isolationism. I you think tht Russia is the exception that will buck this trend, maybe its time to exchange your hard earned US bucks into roubles, tovarishch? 🙂

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  428. @Emil Nikola Richard

    The Ukraine parliament fistfights are hilarious. The Ukraine infantry dying is not.

    Them dying is very sad, especially considering that they die in vain. Russians constantly send them instructions how to preserve their lives by surrendering. But regular Ukie soldiers sometimes don’t have choice: Nazis imbedded in most army units shoot them when they retreat or try to surrender. The lucky ones become prisoners of Russia, DPR, or LPR. There are more than 10,000 Ukie POWs already. The unlucky ones become fertilizer. Very high price for tolerating comprador regime.

    • Replies: @Jazman
    , @Jazman
    , @Gerard1234
  429. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    Generally you choose idiosyncratic views, perhaps Fox News and Ann Coulter supports, but most people view as a bit eccentric.

    I don’t have cable, and don’t watch either of these online (I only stream certain TV shows, Better Call Saul is a good one).

    For example, you would not find the mainstream American historians who believe conquistadors were being “kindly” to people they destroyed.

    Modern mainstream American historians are forced to spit on European culture and history.

    Past ones took the anti-Catholic position (see below).

    Neither normal Spanish people nor Mexicans.

    I’m not familiar with the currents of Spanish historiography but it appears that there has been a pushback against the Protestant views of Spain:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Legend_(Spain)

    Bob Marley is one of the world’s more popular musicians, so people are fans of him in many regions

    Sure, he had some talent, I just thought it was funny to consider him a “genius.” As in the case of Madonna, Mick Jagger, etc. Talent was necessary, also other people’s marketing, etc.

    1990s is viewed usually as a postsoviet time in Russia, not Soviet times.

    The Soviet Union ended in 1991. All of the people involved were Soviet products. The elites were Soviet elites, the regular people were regular Soviets. The 1990s were Soviet people unleashed.

    It’s a more unusual claim like someone saying that Robespierre is a reference for France of the Ancien Régime, or the early Soviet time is pinnacle of the Russian Empire

    The key difference was that in those cases a violent revolution overthrew the old order and destroyed it to varying degrees. Of course, the new world used the old as building blocks so there inevitable were some similarities. I am fond of describing the USSR as a Frankenstein’s monster built out of the corpse of murdered Russia. This monster will share features, in grotesque form, of the murdered victim. But it’s still a different entity.

    Of course, the Revolutionaries were products of the previous order, so one can say – the Tsarist system produced Lenins and Stalins and failed to liquidate them in time, likewise for Robespierre and his fellow monsters. But that’s very different from what happened in Russia the 1990s. Yeltsin was a member of the Soviet Politburo and in charge of Soviet Moscow. Gaidar was the grandson of a famous Soviet writer and editor of the CPSU ideological journal Communist. Kravchuk was Chairman of the Supreme Soviet of the Ukrainian SSR. Even a creature such as Berezovsky had been head of a department in the Institute of Control Sciences of the USSR Academy of Sciences. The post-Soviet rulers were all Soviet elites, not criminal revolutionaries and dissidents. There was no revolution and overthrow and purges, it was just rebranding and taking a different approach by the same people. Only in the Baltics and in western Ukraine (which didn’t control the rest of the country, unfortunately) was there a more revolutionary situation.

    If you wanted to make 1917 like 1991, it would be Nicholas II being pressured to resign while his cousin takes over, renames himself a president (and rules until totally incapacitated), and all the way down the various princes, generals, secret police, government officials replace flags and change their titles while still having the same analogous positions though some enterprising local elites might take advantage and get richer than they would have otherwise. This would actually have been a much better reality than the actual one, because those were better people than the genocidal revolutionary criminals like Lenin and Stalin.

    • Replies: @LatW
    , @Here Be Dragon
    , @Dmitry
  430. @Yevardian

    Also, thanks for the archived blog recommendation from last thread. I also wish that Ron would get some writers who are outside the mainstream and yet are not nutjobs or grifters. Thankfully Raches seems to have gone, but nothing very compelling has replaced him either.

    Everyday concerns are really not marginal since they are, after all, what make up our actual lives. The art of living life well is of the utmost importance and political concerns should be secondary and subservient to everyday actions.

    If every self-avowed conservative Boomer had focused more on their kids moral and ethical formation than politics we would in a bit of a different place, I suspect. But, I suppose theoretical and detached political fomenting/ advocacy is an easy proxy for an actual change in life priorities so it’s a course which feels meaningful without addressing root causes so it has it’s appeal.

    We now exist in such a strangely distorted and extreme media environment that something like the deconstructingleftism blog feels comforting and even quaint (a testament to how quickly the ground has shifted in 7 or 8 years) but I think we could use more like that. We need inspiration to build a better life and family ourselves since that is the building block of any civilization. If enough people did that we’d be just fine.

  431. @Mr. Hack

    Interesting bunch of fairy tales. Fact is, Russia is exporting less oil and natural gas than in the same period of 2021 and getting a lot more money for its oil and gas exports than in 2021.

    As to isolation, who exactly is isolated? No country in Latin America or Africa sanctioned Russia. In Asia, only US-occupied Japan and South Korea and US-dependent Taiwan sanctioned Russia. Not one of the three most populous countries, China, India, and Indonesia, sanctioned Russia. Smaller Asian countries didn’t, either, even US allies Israel, KSA, NATO member Turkey, Bahrain, Kuwait, UAE, etc. Even some European and quasi-European countries didn’t, including presumed US allies Georgia and Moldova. More than 4/5th of the world trade with Russia normally, totally ignoring Ukraine or even siding with Russia, like China.

    As Henry Kissinger said, “To be an enemy of America can be dangerous, but to be a friend is fatal.”

    • Replies: @Jazman
  432. Mikel says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    You don’t think that they are stupid, do you?

    Actually yes, I believe they are.

    In fact, if they lose ground again, for example in the likely upcoming Ukrainian offensive in Kherson, I wouldn’t be surprised if they try to make us believe that they retreat as “a gesture of good will”.

    Not that their counterparts in Kiev are better. See eg their idiotic blacklists of foreign personalities. To think that a dispute between these people may lead us to a nuclear war…

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  433. Yevardian says:
    @Dmitry

    For example, 2010s Bladerunner, was not necessarily worse than the 1980s Bladerunner? in some ways they used more effort conceptually.

    I think that film will come to be seen as a classic of 2010s, definitely. I even think it was significantly superior in many ways, ironically the weakest section of the whole film was the brief direct homage to original film with Harrison Ford’s appearance, it didn’t add anything and felt thematically out of place.

    Anyway, Dmitri, as a fellow moviegoing and dumb person who can’t read, I imagine you’ve seen most of what I’ve mentioned below.

    @yahya

    In the 21st century, off the top of my head I can think of “Dunkirk”, “Darkest Hour”, “Kingdom Of Heaven”, “Life Of Pi”, “The Two Popes”, “The Hateful Eight”, “True Grit”.

    I didn’t really like any of those much. ‘Hateful Eight’ was probably the best of those, but perhaps I was just pleasantly surprised by it since I’d found every film Tarantino made since since ‘Jackie Brown’ to be terrible examples of Tarantino caricaturing himself, couldn’t even finish watching any of them except ‘Basterds’.

    Can you give some examples? I can’t think of a single Hollywood movie produced this century that I’d be interested in.

    Depends how you define ‘Hollywood’. Do you mean simply American or does it have to be intended as a big-budget blockbuster to qualify?

    Anyway, I can think of plenty of American films from the 2010s I thought were great:

    I can see German_Reader enjoying at least some of these: ‘Ex Machina’ (on AI, amazing film all around, best American movie of the decade); ‘Annihilation’ (decent sci-fi body-horror film, managed to have a mostly female cast without it pushing it in your face or being that* unbelievable) ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’ (struggling musician without romantic conclusion); ‘Nightcrawler’ (satire on the media, an overdone theme, but done well); ‘Night Moves’ (about climate change fanatics).

    I also liked, but doubt you would:
    ‘Spring Breakers’. Harmony Korine figured how to make something with huge mainstream success whilst retaining his usual method: vulgar nudity and drug use whilst making a chickenshit ostensible show of condemning it.
    ‘Joker’ ostensibly a superhero (I hate them too) film, it doesn’t contain a single supernatural or fantastical element or gadget. Essentially the creator managed to make a morally ambigious psychological drama by very tenuously tying his script to a Marvel origins story.
    ‘Blue Valentine’ & ‘Her’. Can’t see German_Reader enjoying anything romantically related.. ‘Her’s’ protagonist also happened to be revoltingly believable walking cariacture of 4chan ‘soyboys’, although I’m not sure it was intended that way.
    ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’. Well this needs no introduction, though I have no doubt whatsoever German_Reader despises it. That Scorsese gave Jordan Bellefort a snarky cameo in the film’s final scene and allowed him to make a second lease of life scamming people was also rather disgusting. But nonetheless it’s probably my personal favourite film of the decade, based on simple enjoyment, though I do think ‘Ex Machina’ is an objectively far superior film.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
    , @AP
  434. Wokechoke says:
    @Mikel

    The Russians can keep their artillery parked on the East side of the Dnieper while they ferry across supplies to the west bank to hunkered down soldiers in the bridgehead. Very much like Stalingrad which held out against the Wehrmacht without a bridge while supported by Soviet artillery on the East side of the Volga.

    They probably only need to keep around 5000 men supplied. Perhaps 75 tanks that might already be across the river.

    If the Ukies actually attack as billed they will be subjected to very heavy missile and artillery as they cross a heavily mined no mans land raked by small arms fire and air to surface strikes.

    by all means let’s see the offensive capacity of the Ukraine infantry and tankers. Should be a good show.

    • Replies: @Mikel
  435. LatW says:
    @AP

    the Tsarist system produced Lenins and Stalins and failed to liquidate them in time

    Just a note here — ideas such as anarcho-communism were floating around in the mid to late 19th century Russia even among some nobles. Famously, both Bakunin and Kropotkin were of aristocratic backgrounds (Kropotkin was influenced by the famous French anarchist Proudhon). And, yes, they were persecuted, but it was a real phenomenon that went beyond just the so called proletariat, a kind of a backlash against the ancien regime by some of the nobles themselves.

  436. @AP

    Sure, [Bob Marley] had some talent, I just thought it was funny to consider him a “genius.” As in the case of Madonna, Mick Jagger, etc. Talent was necessary, also other people’s marketing, etc.

    Not simply a genius, but a musical genius.

    Your problem is that you are very crude. You ignore nuances of speech, and often miss the point. With you any conversation is primitive, short-sighted and parochial.

    Yet you have a habit to argue about things, that you know very little about, if anything.

    What, for instance, does marketing have to do with a musical genius? Popularity is not a criterion for artistic merit. There have been many outstanding musicians who were never popular, but are considered genius.

    Bach, for example.

    With your approach it may even be impossible to explain it to you what a musical genius is. A person who doesn’t comprehend that Madonna, Mick Jagger and Bob Marley belong to very different planes must be hopelessly unmusical.

    From the Merriam-Webster dictionary: The Spiritual Origins of Genius

    The belief system of the ancient Romans included spirits that were somewhere in between gods and humans and were thought to accompany each person through life as a protector. The Latin name for this spirit was genius, meaning “to beget.”

    Part of such a spirit’s role was to protect a person’s moral character; in time, that meaning was extended to cover a special ability for doing something, and eventually genius acquired senses referring particularly to “people of great intelligence.”

    So, in other words, a genius in our context is a person who is inspired, who is special, who is gifted in a way that makes him stand out of the rest, someone who is out of ordinary, exceptional.

    A shorter definition of genius: a peculiar, distinctive, or identifying character or spirit.

    A musical genius is a person who is so extraordinarily talented that his music, be he a composer or a songwriter, or even a simple performer, makes him one of a kind. He is unique. He is not like the rest.

    So, Mick Jagger and let alone Madonna are not of this category. They don’t belong to that kind of people. They are “one of many” kind of people.

    Bob Marley, on the other hand, created a new genre of music – reggae. He was not the very first of the pioneers, but it was him who made it what it was, and still is.

    That’s a genius.

    To comprehend what is so special about it you need to understand what is swing, shuffle, time signature, cadence, and other even more esoteric terms, like groove. You can’t actually talk about music if you don’t understand what these are.

    So, really it’s not your place to even voice your opinion, better leave it to those who know a thing or two, since you don’t. Or perhaps make a little effort to understand and expand your narrow horizon.

    Bob Marley was a genius.

    He wrote more than 160 songs, and died when he was 36. For any songwriter such a productivity is amazing. This is a sign of his genius as well, especially considering that he didn’t write bad songs.

    Most people of your ilk are familiar with his pop repertoire, which is a small fracture of his body of work. You probably have never even heard the real Bob Marley. Have you ever smoked any hash?

    Not likely.

    You see, some people do, and some of them are musicians, so if you want to really understand what they are doing, you have to do it the way they do it, i.e. to smoke what they smoke, or else you will not hear it the same way as they do.

    That’s another problem, and that’s why you can’t see the difference between Bob Marley and others. Reggae is cannabis music.

    And finally, Bob Marley was not only a great musician and songwriter, but he was a great poet. His lyrics were way beyond the regular pop, rock or other reggae. His songs were profound and intelligent, and still are moving people the same way so many years later.

    That’s a genius.

    He and his band were great arrangers, great composers, great performers – genius!

    • Replies: @Yahya
    , @AP
  437. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    But the reason you can find kremlinbots to oppose them, is only because the majority of the world consider these views you are bundling as eccentric. Most Westerners would have even less sympathy for those views.

    From what I can see AP seems to hold a lot of views that are closer to the mainstream for practising Catholics in Europe and the US (probably in Latin America as well). Practising Catholics are a minority group in most European countries and always were in the US, though there the minority is large and vigorous by European standards. There are some European countries where it is still closer to the mainstream or bound up with national identity (e.g. parts of Eastern Europe, also Italy, Portugal.)

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Dmitry
  438. Mikhail says: • Website

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  439. Coconuts says:
    @German_reader

    Maybe an echo of the more traditional distinction drawn between the importance of rules for everyday life in Judaism and Islam and the insistence on belief in Christianity (orthopraxy vs orthodoxy).

    I think so, I heard someone discussing other later 19th century views (I think from Nietszche but not sure) on this topic and they were similar to what Drumont was writing. Another angle might be that Drumont was a kind of socialist at the same time as a kind of traditionalist. Some of the things he writes about ‘semites’, even their ritualistic religious life, sound like critiques of typical bourgeois attitudes other French socialists were producing round this time.

    One of the other great French Aryanists I mentioned earlier, de Lapouge, also came was associated with the radical left, seems he was trying to reconcile racial determinism with some form of Marxism.

    I just find it surprising that it still seems to be persuasive to quite a few people, despite all the EU integration.

    To some extent the EU seems to have a space for the revival or maintenance of historical grievances, as long as it is in a limited way. I was thinking of the way they reemerged in the UK and in Spain as well.

  440. china-russia-all-the-way says:

    Ehud Barak believes Iran will make a dash for it, building the nuke and delivery system when the US is tied up. Scenarios could either involve Ukraine or now Taiwan in light of the military crisis brought on by Pelosi’s visit. Or both.

    Israel should be reserved the right to a large-scale military operation against the Islamic Republic, as a nuclear breakout “will most probably” occur when the US has its hands full with other crises across the globe, Barak said.

    https://www.jpost.com/middle-east/iran-news/article-713089

    Why not instead curtail support for Ukraine and Taiwan while the Iran nuclear program is in a position to break out? There has to be others, other than Yossi Cohen, not only in Israel but Washington with sympathy for Israel who realize a triple crisis will be a true disaster for Israel. Thousands dead in Israel because Iran can’t swiftly be defeated if only less than half of US combat power is available against Iran.

  441. @Thulean Friend

    Whether China will be cornered into having no other choice but to invade, or the US would isolate China after a preemptive invasion, makes no practical difference to American imperialism in eliminating Chinese influence outside its borders or accelerating separatist projects. This is why both of these 2 narratives are featured now.

    China can send out aircraft to “follow” the flight or surround the island with PLAN, and these alone are enough for the US to step up the economic warfare (which has been done on Iran & Cuba without them actually waging war on the US).

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    , @songbird
  442. Wokechoke says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Scheldt

    Kherson is shaping up in to a re-run of the Scheldt… With over whelming superiority the Western allies lost 12,000 men clearing the estuary. Or do the Russians repeat the successful bridgeless ferry based resupply of Stalingrad?

  443. songbird says:

    I envy Koreans and the Chinese because if they ever need a villain for a dramatic story, they can use Manchus, who are stateless, or the Mongols, who weren’t defeated in the same sense as Indians.

    IMO, it doesn’t have the nasty political implications that a lot of stories set in Europe have, due to stoking national antagonisms.

    Nothing is more stupid than German villains, as they are the core population of Europe, and making them the villains is like shooting yourself in the face. Similarly, with English or French villains, which just stoke neighboring antagonisms.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  444. @Yellowface Anon

    I think the background to this recent escalation are China’s recent technological advances in the chips industry, which have been faster than most people anticipated.

    Semiconductors is the last major “chokehold” industry that the US can cripple China with. Once we’re past that, there is no arrow left in the quiver. The point of leverage is to use it. Once you no longer have it, you’ve lost.

    In recent months, USG has been pressuring the Dutch to prevent ASML from shipping older DUV machines to Chinese foundries. ASML is already forbidden from exporting more advanced EUV machines. So far, the Dutch are resisting Washington’s requests but a dramatic escalation over Taiwan would surely help sway the Dutch. That’s probably a factor in USG’s calculations.

    China’s main competitor to ASML is called SMEE, and they are not yet ready with their DUV machines. This is the achilles heel of their ecosystem. For all the attention that SMIC has gotten, SMEE is arguably even more important and they’ve failed thus far.

    So right now, escalation makes strategic sense for US. The way China is progressing technologically, it would make them impossible to sanction 10 years forward. Military means are simply not an option. The time to strike, if you’re going to strike, is now. The US doesn’t have time on its side.

    If Pelosi were to visit Taiwan and China does nothing it would be a massive loss of face. A de facto recognition of its independence would likely follow as China’s passivity sends the signal that China is more bark than bite. That’s something a long succession of Chinese leaders have declared time and again to be their red line for invasion. But if they showed weakness once, USG will be emboldened to assume the threats are hollow.

    These events can have re-inforcing dynamics once they are set in motion. It’s certainly incredibly dangerous games that USG is playing, but from a coldly rational point of view it’s understandable. I would probably have escalated even earlier in their position.

    [MORE]

    It’s worth noting that this isn’t the first time that USG has used Pelosi as a human decoy to advance this policy. She was supposed to visit Taiwan earlier in the year but once China started to amp up the rhetoric she suddenly – and very conveniently – got COVID and was no longer able to visit.

    Once she recovered, the trip was simply quietly shelved and nobody spoke about it until USG resurrected it in recent weeks, while playing the good cop/bad cop routine, which Beijing is correctly seeing through as a smokescreen.

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Beckow
  445. songbird says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    They are going to need something occult, if they want to take out an undead necromancer licht like Pelosi.

    Since the CCP destroyed indigenous Chinese temple culture and the churches are all state-approved, I don’t know if they have it.

  446. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    The entire Russian policy towards the EU is a disgusting cocktail of arrogant rudeness, teenage infantilism and primitive stupidity – Mr. Hack
    Russian man living in Ukraine says to Russia: “Please don’t save us”

  447. Yahya says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Since we are on the topic of popular music, i’m going to have to put in a word for 20th century Greek Éntekhno music; which is one of my favorite genres of music. It combines Western orchestral elements with Greek instruments – the most prominent among them being the bouzouki – and folk rhythms and melodies. It’s not quite “pop” nor is it “classical” music, but kind of a blend of both; though tending more to the pop side. The two most prominent composers in the 20th century were Mikis Theodorakis and Manos Hadjidakis; both of whom were classically trained musicians who combined their knowledge of Greek and Western music to create the field.

    [MORE]

    Manos Hadjidakis:

    Mikis Theodorakis:

  448. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    You repeat simplistic stereotypes and don’t address the specific situation in Czecho-Slovakia. Shallow and lazy. You have been fed a picture that has 2-3 elements and no matter what the reality, you only see that picture. You know nothing about the 19th century Czech nationalism, what drove the creation of Czecho-Slovakia in 1918, what impact WWII had, and the expulsion of Germans (Sudetens) in 1945-47. None of those, other than partially the last one, even included any ‘commies’. The Sudeten expulsion was done my Czech nationalist gment from London – look that up. The partial distancing from the West has always been a big part of Czech national consciousness.

    Prague has not been a religious city for a few hundred years. The number of ‘catholics’ or ‘protestants’ there is purely nominal – it is a secular city par excellence, maybe similar to Amsterdam. People pre-1918 had to have an official ‘religion’ – it was compulsory in the Habsburg authoritarian system. With 1918 independence it was abolished.

    It was perfectly legal to be a catholic-protestant-… under the commies – people were baptised openly (I was), nobody cared. It kept few people from getting high level government positions, but even among them it was tolerated. This soviet idea that you have that we lived in some ‘stalinist’ enforced atheism is wrong. The number of atheists actually grew after 1989. You know nothing and project your soviet paranoias.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
    , @Dmitry
  449. Beckow says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I agree. We are at an inflection point with technological-economic advances that have to be resolved geo-politically. Who will control what, who will make money, how will it be managed across the world.

    The West has a big issue: they have not prepared for this moment. Moving manufacturing to China, Europe feasting on the cheap Russian resources, has made the Western position weaker. An old-out-fight requires sacrifices – Europe has to lower its living standards, Americans have to work harder doing things that they don’t feel like doing. Both China and Russia are in a better position to sacrifice.

    The West has waited too long – the populist intermezzo with Brexit-Trump-migrants was mishandled: instead of using it to change policies, the geriatric Western liberal elites doubled and tripled down. Pelosi is a typical example of this stupidity – although she is far from an independent actor, she just performed her role.

    As the window to adjust the policies closed, the neo-liberal elites had to escalate: Ukraine, Taiwan, suppression of domestic dissent. Done in a hasty, thoughtless way. They look like a bunch of octogenarians throwing a temper-tantrum in an assisted nursing facility, half-asleep, half-mad. This is what happens when the elites refuse to rotate, when the old stay too long. In the ancient Egypt they built the largest pyramids when the pharaohs lived too long – an enormous waste, now we get half-dead leaders taking a few pills and screaming incoherent nonsense at cameras as the earnest underlings look on. They are not ready for what is coming.

  450. @Dmitry

    But it’s a common pattern in the 3rd world; they seem in constant need of “more investment” because their infrastructure is degraded and their people are poor. Somehow though, resources get extracted, multinational corps. make great profit margins, and the local oligarchs and well connected make off with the rest.

    It’s relatively easy to take advantage of poor corrupt countries and exploit their resources. It seems to me that Ukraine fits into this category neatly enough. Ukrainian farmland is a massive prize for whoever controls it and is only destined to become more valuable in coming decades. I fully expect that it would be a prize worth taking risks over.

    I’m sure the current war scares off some investors but creates massive opportunities for the daring wiling to stake a bet. I’m sure that no-one seriously expects Russia to take all of Ukraine, and in that scenario there is lots of “safe” land in Ukraine to call dibs on ahead of big potential changes in land ownership rules. There is no better time to make big moves that might otherwise attract scrutiny than when there are bigger distractions going on.

    https://global.ilmanifesto.it/the-truth-about-corporations-taking-over-ukrainian-agricultural-lands/

    Did you take a look at this article that Here Be Dragon originally posted? It seemed accurate enough when I followed up on some of the details mentioned.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  451. Mikel says:
    @Wokechoke

    I would also be surprised if a Ukrainian counterattack in Kherson was successful but it is no secret that Ukrainian military operations are being coordinated by the West to a large extent, especially by Britain, so they must be studying their options very carefully.

    In any case, all signs are that the Ukrainians believe that they need to show their Western backers some significant military success in order to keep receiving aid and not be pushed to negotiations. They may be right. The Europeans are beginning to experience increasing economic hardship. For most people it must be their first time living under rationing of essential services. Here in the US inflation hurts but the labor market continues to be tight. The moment a recession hits, however, people are going to start questioning how long we can keep spending billions in Ukraine. Some figures in the Republican camp are already questioning it.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Sean
  452. Jazman says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Mr Hack likes to be Hacked

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  453. Jazman says:
    @AnonfromTN

    Mr Hack likes to be Hacked

  454. Jazman says:
    @AnonfromTN

    When his Ukrainians are dying in a NATO proxy war and he pose for Vogue , that is ridiculous , he is a morally bankrupt NATO-controlled parasite who sends his own people to death while dressing up & prostituting himself to Western warlords.

    • Agree: Mikhail
  455. Beckow says:
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    We already have one all out war, maybe two or three more will be added. It looks like the long predicted WWIII, except it has not been what people feared (so far): it is the usual power-and-borders regional fight with outsiders taking sides. The bloody slug in Ukraine may actually discourage others from doing the same – it nicely shows that countries are big, draftees numerous, and remote weapons not decisive.

    Syria and Iraq are today more internally stable, unless a massive attack happens (by Turkey, Israel…) it will stay relatively minor. The West managed to outplay itself: they went to too many places and got kicked out from almost all of them. That’s not a good visual, it establishes a pattern. To break that pattern in Ukraine would be very hard. So this will more likely move to an economic and culture struggle – a long painful period of hurting each other. The good news is that social experiments like the gender-madness or ‘open borders’ may fizzle out as times become more serious. If not, the West will literally become a joke.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  456. @AP

    Your previous comments about “throwing poop” suggest that feces is, for some reason, an important theme for you. A reflection of some inner essence, which comes to mind easily and often.

    Yes, it comes to mind every time we speak. Must have something to do with you.

    Hello.

    [G.G. Allin] was a very marginal figure whom few people heard of. The fact that you have heard of him and that he came to your mind tells us much more about your own debauched Soviet soul than about the USA.

    He existed, and existed in the USA. No one of his kind has ever existed anywhere else. He recorded and released 15 albums, made an appearance on The Jane Whitney Show, and his page on the mainstream allmusic.com website features his comprehensive biography.

    He was a celebrity.

    Even a documentary, dedicated exclusively to him and his life was filmed; it received critical acclaim, and was reviewed on mainstream publications, such as Revolver magazine and even The Washington Post.

    And as a matter of fact, it is still available on YouTube.

    You should watch it, because it really is a revelatory experience, it exposes the innermost spirit of the American society, in which you live. But of course, you are probably busy and have no time, in which case use the timecode of 12:30 and 43:30, to get straight to the point.

    Only then you will miss the many words of praise and accolades from the middle class American intellectuals, that they say about this wonderful artist.

    On the other hand, Sector Gaza were very popular among kids who had been brought up in Soviet schools and Soviet families.

    Yes, apparently they were, in the villages and in the families of those who were from the villages, like your family relatives who live in a village, otherwise how would you know that?

    These cabbage pickers don’t know any better, but then again – they are not fully human, they are human-like. You have repeatedly admitted, and relying on your personal experience confirmed, that intellectual development of the Ukrainians abruptly comes to an end at the age of eighteen or so, and thereafter they are steadily degrading.

    You explained to me, that this is a hereditary feature of your ilk. So, what does surprise you? This is normal. They are of your kind, of the same background, of the same heritage – колхозный панк-рок is how they described their style. The peasant punk.

    But it should be noted herein that even these anthropoids were never even lose to being as obnoxious and abominable as some of their American counterparts, like the aforementioned one and others of this sort. Like Mötley Crüe, for example.

    Were Mötley Crüe popular enough for you?

    Because if not we have Christina Aguilera here.

    Your effort to take a higher ground in this discussion is hopeless.

    Everybody knows that it is your country where most of the pornography is produced, it is from your country it spreads throughout the world, and it is your country where there are organizations like the North American Man/Boy Love Association.

    So please, bitch, please!

    The Soviets lived the life in the 1990s: homicide rate unheard of in Western European-settled countries, epic debauchery.

    Yes, the homicide rate was very high during the criminal war years, but debauchery? What are you talking about?

    Nobody in the former Soviet Union anywhere could have even imagined anything like what you see in your crazy country on a regular basis.

    Your people are finished.

    [MORE]

    So don’t you talk about debauchery, you are probably a porn addict, better go and take a look in the mirror.

    As a non-English speaker you can’t judge.

    But we are speaking English. We have been speaking for a long time. Mine is probably a bit awkward and certainly far from eloquent, but it is self-taught, and what’s your excuse?

    Yours is so poor that even a non-English speaker like me can see that.

    Your city was highly populated by deracinated colonists sent into western Ukraine. But presumably the villagers moving in would still be religious.

    My city was populated mostly by the Ukrainians, there were very few Russians or people of other ethnicities, like my father’s parents, who were transferred for military service from other parts of the country. My entire building were military families.

    There were Ukrainians who had lived in the city for several generations, and they spoke Russian at home and on the street. One of my best friends was a pure Ukrainian, and both of his parents spoke Russian.

    These were different from those Ukrainians who came from the countryside, like two separate peoples.

    Except for the Ukrainians there were not a few Hebrews in the town. That’s an old town, and the Hebrews lived there for a very long time. Since the time of the Polish-Lithuanian state.

    My grandmother’s family had a house of their own.

    And believe me these rural people were not religious. They were tribalistic, they were violent, and they drank a lot. They were very rude and crude. And didn’t go to church.

    The reason for appreciation of bride’s virginity was that it was considered a sign of a good upbringing, and fidelity in relationships was appreciated as well, and most ladies married early.

    This was a completely secular culture.

    As a matter of fact, if some people do it out of religious considerations you can’t actually consider them to be of high moral. The cause of such a moral behaviour in this case is not a moral feeling per se, but the religious obedience.

    Such a person can be in fact immoral.

    We used to celebrate [Kupala Night] in the diaspora, in early July which was near the solstice. Gogol wrote about it. Did the Soviets kill this tradition, as they did many others in their quest to make the world uglier?

    Gogol was a homo. He preferred Petersburg to Ukraine, so he could visit public toilets, frequented by sailors. No one cares what he wrote.

    And you are missing the point.

    One thing is to celebrate a solstice, for its own sake, and another a Christian holiday, the origin of which you don’t know anything about. Your kind of celebration is a folk tribal gathering, devoid of any spiritual meaning.

    The more Sovietized parts, given their disgusting Soviet morality, would show more expressions of debauchery than the least Sovietized parts. For example, compare Lviv to Luhansk.

    No, we will not compare Lviv to Luhansk, because it’s completely pointless.

    Lvov is an old city, with history and beautiful architecture, with a special atmosphere and a substantial percentage of indigenous population, i.e. of people whose families were born in the city and have lived in it for many generations.

    Lvov has been a cultural center of the region for centuries. So, consequently the population of it is probably more intelligent, the beauty of it has a positive effect on the people.

    And what is Lugansk – it’s a purely industrial city, that was even founded as a huge factory and not a city, and it’s only two hundred years old. There are few buildings worth looking at, and very poor cultural life.

    Hence, the population of it are mostly working class people, the atmosphere must be rather depressing. You cannot compare apples to oranges, especially if you ignore the aforementioned differences.

    So, in the plain language, there are many more cabbage pickers in Lugansk. This determines everything.

    And regarding your other comparison, it is equally unfair.

    There are many more factories – many more, in Zhytomir than there are in Rivne, and therefore, many more cabbage pickers.

    A better comparison might be Zhytomir against Lutsk. These are pretty similar cities and the latter was a part of Poland, the same as Rivne.

    You can see from this crime rate statistics that debauchery, as you call it, doesn’t have anything to do with your theories. The number of registered crimes per capita in Zhytomir and Lutsk is approximately the same. And in fact it is higher in Rivne.

    The most criminal regions in Ukraine are not surprisingly those, where most of the industry is located – Zaporizhzhie, Kirovohrad, Dnipro, Kherson, Donetsk, and Lugansk. These are industrial cities, port cities. That’s where the criminals operate. The less industry, the less crime.

    And here is the homicide rate.

    Not surprisingly, the highest in Odessa, Lugansk, and Donetsk. The latter two have been a region of crime wars for decades, and Odessa has been the capital of crime for ever. And Zhytomir and Lutsk are once again approximately the same. Note, that in this respect the city of Lvov is ahead of Vinnitsa, and is in fact at the same rate as Mariupol.

    And finally, here is drug-related crimes rate.

    As you can see, most of it is in Nikolaev – because that’s where they grow opium poppies. And it has nothing to do with being, as you say, Sovietized.

    A very stupid theory.

    Note, that Zhytomir and Lutsk are at approximately the same rate again, but un-Sovietized Ternopol is a lot higher. That’s because they grow poppies there, as well. There’s right climate and good soil.

    The Mesoamericans worshipped demons and sacrificed 100,000s of people on crude blood-soaked pyramids. The Spaniards freed them from this slavery to demons, taught them to read and write, built beautiful baroque cathedrals out of the crude pyramids, and taught the Natives of America to make beautiful music.

    This is a good one.

    You couldn’t say anything more ignorant than this; it deserves a separate reply.

    You must be soiled indeed in your soul to view this process as “ruination of entire cultures.”

    And you truly are exceptional. And some people don’t believe, that the Americans are exceptional. They need to come here, and read your comments – they are exceptionally stupid.

    The primitives who built Stonehenge were also aware of such things [solstice]. People can observe what the longest day of the year is, if they are motivated to do so. They had thousands of years. It does not require brilliance.

    Well, if you say so then you will probably have no trouble to explain herein, how exactly were they able to determine, which day of the year was the longest.

    Byzantine Europeans knew quite a lot. Arabs learned from them, and modern anti-European atheists such as you and other Sovoks give credit to the Arabs or other non-Europeans.

    First of all, what makes you think of me as of an atheist – my critical standpoint regarding the Catholic Church?

    Well, then you should read the Hammer of Witches, i.e. Malleus Maleficarum. A very interesting book, it really blew my mind. Highly recommended.

    And second, the ancient Greeks learned from the Hindus, and then the Arabs learned from the Greeks, but in the Catholic world the Europeans learned from the Arabs, and it was much later.

    It’s banal [who and why should be considered a musical genius]: Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Schubert.

    If Bob Marley, why not Elvis? Or someone else whom Boomers love, like Mick Jagger?

    Because Elvis and Mick Jagger were mediocrities, and their music was superficial. They were popular, but not special. They were empty and shallow.

    Were you able to tell the real art from the imitation of art, you might have said then why not Neil Young, or someone else who was a great artist, like Paul McCartney, or at least Kurt Cobain?

    But you are clueless.

    Probably for this reason you still haven’t elaborated on why, in your opinion, Mozart and Beethoven, Bach, and Schubert, were as you think, genius.

    Because you don’t really know.

    • Replies: @AP
  457. @Beckow

    Actually, there was no such kind of atheism is the Soviet Union. Or there was, but only in the beginning, like during the 1920s-1930s.

    During my time those who wanted to be baptized had no problem with it whatsoever, and there were churches in every town and in every village.

    My family had a beautiful 18th century icon on the wall, painted in a monastery in Greece, on the Mount Athos, and a New Testament in the old print.

    My neighbor sang in a church choir.

    No one cared about any of this.

    The situation with religion was in fact the healthiest possible, because nobody was proselitizing and nobody was forbidden to pratice; the state was not interfering in any way.

    Unlike now, when they are spending enormous money and growing this artificial congregation, putting it into the minds of those who do not need it, teaching it in school, etc.

    There’s nothing good about it.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  458. @Beckow

    To break that pattern in Ukraine would be very hard.

    There are nuances. Say, in Afghanistan it was the empire itself that lost. Very little wiggle room for propaganda.

    In Ukraine, in essence Russia is fighting the whole NATO shebang and slowly winning. But proxi wars have an advantage that is often overlooked: you can blame the proxi. I foresee how the propaganda in the empire and its sidekicks will deal with the loss in Ukraine. It will shift the blame by saying that Russia won not because NATO weapons, ammo, or instructors are bad, but because Ukrainians are hopelessly incompetent, or cowardly, or pro-Russian, or some combination thereof. Imperial and copycat propaganda will do its level best to prevent an average Joe from seeing the pattern. Given dismal IQ of said average Joe, it is likely to succeed.

    • Replies: @A123
  459. Wokechoke says:

    Ferry services commence…

    Russians begin to use purpose built PTS amphibious haulers.

    Each unit can carry a 10 ton load out. Basically a supply truck. Hitch two together and it can haul a track and an artillery piece. Presumably this configuration can ferry across tanks on rafts.

    There’s a five mile stretch of river a few hundred feet wide separating Kherson and the East bank. Will be interesting to see if the Russians stick it out or evacuate Kherson.

    They can safely line up artillery on the east bank to provide over watch that goes all the way into Nikolaev too.

  460. Sean says:
    @Mikel

    In any case, all signs are that the Ukrainians believe that they need to show their Western backers some significant military success in order to keep receiving aid and not be pushed to negotiations.

    I take a different view as I already said; in my opinion the Ukrainians will get more quantities and better quality military aid the worse they do. They didn’t give Ukraine MLRS in the first month when they were doing well. Now they are refusing to say how many MLRS Ukraine has been given. The Ukrainians are hitting the motorcades of senior officers with these things. Ukraine will get the ATACMS missile eventually., maybe as a result of the last few days’ Russian gains. America does not want to give Ukraine enough to force the Russian army back. No, the preferred Ukraine war scenario for the US is an agonizingly slow rolling retreat for Ukraine and a pyrrhic advance at the speed of dry rot for Russia. By supplying just enough but not too much advanced arms and intel to Ukraine to keep them in the fight and keep the Russians thinking they are on the verge of breaking the Ukrainian resistance. America is controlling this war and using Ukraine to cripple Russia’s military capacity. It is hardly a secret

    Lloyd Austin: US Aims to See Russia ‘Weakened,’ Strongest …https://www.businessinsider.com › us-defense-secretary-…
    25 Apr 2022 — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin says the US aim is to make Russia so weak it can’t invade another country again

    The moment a recession hits, however, people are going to start questioning how long we can keep spending billions in Ukraine. Some figures in the Republican camp are already questioning it.

    There is no scarcity of US will for money to be spent on Ukraine. The military budget of the US has not been dipped into at all yet. It is Ukrainians who are dying and having their country decimated.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    , @Wokechoke
  461. @AnonfromTN

    Very much true. Ukrop POW’s are closer to 16000+. Several of them already helping to rebuild physically the mass damage they did. However they have enormous amounts of “political” prisoners from before the war….. and these numbers have greatly increased since the war as they snatch people off the streets for a “holiday” in SBU zastenka.

    Nobody knows the exact number of these prisoners. You would think Ukronazis are building up this number to make up for the large disparity in captured soldiers that needs to be done before any future big prisoner swaps. They can just claim “Russian intelligence”, for all the civilians arrested, or throw military overalls on them, Medvedchuk-style .
    These are plenty of women getting snatched or “disappearing” after being critical also.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  462. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    Many of AP’s views could be mainstream in different places.

    He believes HIV is curse for sin, this would be probably popular for strict Catholics in Brazil or Africa.

    He believes class hierarchy and unequal distribution of resources is reflection of peoples’ moral virtue, with a positive correlation. This is mainstream in India, while essentially anti-Christian. But it is also very matching not-disclosed views of New England’s elite society (with “Boston Brahmins” reflecting their Hindu inspiration). And it is very convenient for postsoviet elites. But Jesus says it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle and there is inverse correlation of virtue and greater distribution of resources.

    He think countries are punished for historical sins. This is how ancient Israelites believed. Perhaps most societies used to think like this, in early ancient history and prehistory.

    He says conquistadors were kindly to natives. Perhaps this is not a very Catholic view i.e. Bartolomé de las Casas. But it would have been supported by Spanish authorities of the 16th century.

    The view Christianity should be celebrated as military conquering the world greater than Mongol, is matching American rightwing views, with connection to the military industry.

    This was not to say AP doesn’t have right for his views. But his desire to bundle them to arguments about the Soviet Union, or say they oppose to Soviet culture weakens his criticisms of Soviet history, and adds another motive for why he likes arguing with kremlinbots.

    There is some brand differentiation, as AP has more than average Westerners’ overlap with narratives presented by Putin. For example, Kiselyov and Solovyov are copy-pasting some of these same views from Fox. AP believes countries which have recent communist history are the center of Europe (he has now moved to saying Warsaw Pact countries are the “youth” of Europe), that postsoviet Russia is culturally successful, that we should regard the Soviet culture as representative of all negative things we normally match to contemporary postsoviet culture, etc.

  463. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    specific situation in Czecho-Slovakia… Prague has not been a religious city for a few hundred years. The number of ‘catholics’ or ‘protestants’ there is purely nominal

    I didn’t say anything about Prague being a religious city. I said “Catholics in Prague” as an example of a slavic population, who would be viewed as more Western in the 19th century than Latin-origin speaking Romanians. You reply there are only tens of Catholics in Prague. But they were the majority in the census, whether very religious or not is a different, unrelated discussion (even interesting it may be).

    You repeat simplistic stereotypes and don’t address the specific situation in Czecho-Slovakia. Shallow and lazy. You have been fed a picture that has 2-3 elements and no matter what the reality, you only see that picture. You know nothing about the 19th century Czech nationalism

    You are writing to another person, like you didn’t read my posts. Then you write along an unrelated pathway, about Czecho-Slovakia.

    Your points about Czecho-Slovakia are certainly interesting, but they have no relation to what I have written. But I don’t feel bad for giving you an opportunity to write about Czecho-Slovakia, as that is an interesting topic and you know about it.

    Also, claiming the Cold War is not the significant reason slavic countries were separated from Western Europe in recent history, is just an implausible direction. When the Cold War ends, Czech Republic, Poland, etc, become part of the Western European bloc, which shows how contingently these blocs (West vs East) are arranged from geopolitics, rather than conflict of slavs vs saxons.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  464. Beckow says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    …nobody was proselitizing and nobody was forbidden to pratice; the state was not interfering in any way.

    A good summary. In Czech0-Slovakia the so-called persecution of the church was basically ignoring them and taking away privileges they had for hundreds of years. (After WWII there was also a quick settling of scores with the prelates and priests who collaborated with the Nazis.) When the monks, nuns and bishops were told that their privileged life was over, the lands that they owned were confiscated and many had to get real jobs, they went ballistic and screamed that they were ‘oppressed’. By that standard, everybody else also used to be ‘oppressed’ throughout the history.

    Active church goers were not allowed to be a minister of interior or school principals. But those are the kinds of normal restrictions that all societies have: in West Germany commies (or former Nazis) couldn’t be teachers or government employees. In US a noisy atheist would probably also be barred from many jobs.

    The churches functioned normally, masses, baptisms, wedding, there were Sunday schools for the more enthusiastic. The ever-so-smart Westerners were told that we had ‘enforced atheism‘, that people went to jail for ‘belief in Christ‘. Nonsense, and who exactly had more propaganda?

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  465. Dmitry says:
    @Barbarossa

    It’s an Italian communist newspaper, so what their funding? maybe we should read it as an editorial.

    I’m not so knowledgeable especially about the global agriculture industry. Perhaps multinationals have added problems of agriculture in Africa, Latin America, South Asia.

    Some of the stories are famous, such as becoming dependent on corporations’ seeds. Perhaps Ukraine will receive similar problems.

    Although Ukraine’s agricultural is postsoviet, so we won’t lose diversity of seeds or traditional farming methods (that could happen in less developed regions).

    But I’m just adding the wider problem in the postsoviet space is lack of investment. Money exits, while people stay. But eventually, with some delay, the young people start to follow exit of the money.*

    Ukraine needs to become safe, transparent, anti-corrupt, etc, political and legal environment, and then motive for the outflow of money is reduced, incentive for real foreign investment (not just washed money returning) increases.

    *This is mainly internal immigration, but it can become external. In Russia, originally the government has created very easy paths to exit Russia (without tracking anything) as the elite depends on moving between Russia and the West, both for their lifestyle and their assets. But they now have to be worried about non-elite people emigrating and a lot of current conflict with the West, been partly viewed more positively, as it can be a way to create barriers for this. At the same time they like to increase internal immigration, they will need to close the external route.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  466. @Gerard1234

    The actions of SBU (Ukie Gestapo) shows regime’s desperation. However, I don’t think that RF, DPR, or LPR will exchange Ukie soldiers for Ukrainian citizens. Besides, Ukie POWs have a lot to do: Ukies damaged and destroyed so much in Donbass, that to restore even half of it those 16 thousand would have to work for many years. There will be more Ukie POWs, though. Allied forces are using the tactic of surrounding or semi-surrounding Ukie-fortified areas, so that Ukie soldiers have limited options: die ingloriously, run for their lives, or surrender. As previous experience shows, those who have a chance prefer to surrender, as that’s the only guarantee that they won’t be sent back to the front lines to die ingloriously.

  467. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    old order and destroyed it to varying degrees.

    Re-enforced the old ways in many more degrees. Essentially rebranding projects, as also in the 1991.

    Tsarist system produced Lenins and Stalins

    You are arguing that 1990s high murder rates created by wars between mafia are produced by “Soviet education”, etc, so you can argue these murder rates are the representative of Soviet culture.

    But then you would have to accept the same argument about the political elites, that Stalin is produced in a seminary, as a trainee in Georgia’s Russian Orthodox church. Lenin is produced by Imperial Kazan University.

    failed to liquidate them in time

    Now you begin to write like Stalin, who you supposedly oppose. But Stalin simply thought the same as you about this topic. Stalin’s views and policies would not be culturally alien to the Russian Empire, as they are related to not so simple problems of the same country.

    Even you were arguing about how Tolstoy, as if he was so different to Soviet culture. But if you read Tolstoy, many of his writing could be newspaper editorials about the 20th and 21st century. Stalin has a disaster of collectivization of agriculture. But of course, one of Tolstoy’s favorite views, was the need to collectivize agriculture.

    likewise for Robespierre .

    Yes because you now start to think like Stalin. “Meet the new boss”. He learns from main mistake of his past boss and re-enforces counter-revolutionary forces.

    Russian Empire had the world’s largest secret police, but it was not enough to manage the world’s largest country. So maybe you need to multiply the size of the counter-revolutionary forces, increase capacity in labor camp. This what the new boss is motivated by.

    no revolution and overthrow and purges, it was just rebranding and taking a different approach by the same people

    It’s not the same people, as they are only able to rebrand and downsize, when the old generation of bosses who actually believe Soviet ideology, has died.

    Generational change before 1991 allowed almost the same extent of rebranding as 1917, and results are not so dissimilar. Timelines are running a little more laggy compared to 1917. E.g. 1936-38 from 1917 – around 20 years. Change has been more gentle and we live in a more relatively peaceful epoch. Politicians today are less brutal than a century ago or even two centuries ago.

    wanted to make 1917 like 1991, it would be Nicholas II

    And converts the country to communism, plans to collectivize industry, property, agriculture, etc.

    Lenin was possibly less radical than re-structuring from the late 1980s, as he tried to delay the conversion to communism, with a new economic policy, under a mixed economy. It’s only after Stalin that a kind of real command economy is created.

    • Replies: @AP
  468. Mr. Hack says:
    @Jazman

    Jazman getting down and trolling the Hack – it worked! 🙂

  469. Here is the link to detailed info about liberation of Uglegorskaya TES and the people who liberated it: https://t.me/riafan_everywhere/11710

    Most important point is, Donbass won’t be subjugated by anyone. Years ago in WWII German Nazis were mortally afraid of Donbass coal miner units in the Red Army. As Ukies worship Hitler and his army, they might as well learn something useful from their idols.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  470. Mikel says:
    @Sean

    America does not want to give Ukraine enough to force the Russian army back. No, the preferred Ukraine war scenario for the US is an agonizingly slow rolling retreat for Ukraine and a pyrrhic advance at the speed of dry rot for Russia.

    That may be the desired goal but the US does not have the ability to remote-control a war of this magnitude like that. And supporting Ukraine against Russia is not just sending massive amounts of weapons, equipment and ammunition (that the US may need in other theaters). It’s also financing the Ukrainian state and its millions of refugees. Congress has already approved dozen of billions in aid to Ukraine. If a recession hits, I don’t see Biden continuing to present multibillion bills in support of a foreign war indefinitely.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Sean
  471. @AnonfromTN

    Tried to ask Ron Unz about embedding Telegram videos here. He didn’t reply; and it requires registration to watch. Was it the Wagner group?

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
  472. @Here Be Dragon

    Was it the Wagner group?

    As far as I know from Telegram and other sources, it was Wagner group plus DPR and LPR forces. One more merit for the Wagner group. They achieved quite a bit in this war.

  473. @Yevardian

    Ex Machina was not bad but far from great, Llewyn Davis was pretty good and the Bladerunner’s sequel was rather so-so. The Hateful Eight might have been a good one, if it wasn’t so vulgar.

    Here are a few really good films of 2010s:

    The Counselor, Sicario, The Rum Diary, Bad Times at the El Royale, Galveston, The Girl with All the Gifts; and then a Swedish crime thriller Snabba Cash was really good.

    You should also see True Detective, Generation Kill and Raised by Wolves TV series.

    And for those who understands Russian, here is something special.

    This one is independent, very intelligent and sometimes funny science fiction; it’s not for everybody but is worth a try.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  474. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    The expression ‘Catholics in Prague‘ is comical, so I tried to put some context around it. But if you see the religion-culture as a place-holder for being more Western, then I agree. There have always been two main traditions: Western and native. The native tradition is not very visible to outsiders and is more inward looking than pro-Russian. It sees the West as also being a foreign culture – remember that Czechs and Germans have fought on and off for hundreds of years with sad WWII conclusion when the German population was expelled.

    The commie angle is overstated, they were multi-cultural and opposed to national aspirations. The last thing commie wanted was some ‘Slav‘ alliance – it was all ‘workers and Soviets’, not about nationalities. Italian, Chilean or French leftists were equally at home in Prague of the 80’s and more visible than Russians. East Germany was a prime ally. The argument that the “commies caused separation from the West” is not true – actually in the commie decades the population became much more Western oriented, a lot more than at any point in the past. It was the de-nationalization process that was at the center of all communist systems at that time.

  475. S says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    If Pelosi was to put her plan of visiting Taiwan into action (desite apparent warnings from the American military), she could be the second Gavrilo Princip.

    She could very well be just that, and Taiwan a second Sarajevo.

    Anyhow, whether it takes place there, or, somewhere else, everything is now in place for a global explosion of hostilities (aka WWIII) to commence, which could be anytime.

    A few days ago the headlines in the US were screaming that Iran effectively has the technical ability to build a nucleur bomb, at will. Iran having a nuke is seen as intolerable by the powers that be of the US/UK.

    The Fall of Capitalism, ie the economic and political collapse of the United States and its Western bloc, closely paralleling the Fall of Communism thirty years ago, could very well take place momentarily.
    [A world war, combined with rising interest rates, may well just ‘break the camel’s back’ economically in this regard.]

    This event must take place so that the manufactured and broadly controlled (crimethink, I know) late 18th century born Capitalist vs Communist Hegelian Dialectic can be moved forward towards a final synthesis to form Global Multi-Culturalism. This synthesis will in turn allow for the ushering in of the long sought after world state/empire, the United States of the World.

    The perpetrators of this coming world war, to cover themselves for both their past and future vast crimes against the peoples of the world, and against mankind as a whole, have already floated what they believe will be a get out of jail free card for themselves, ie a truth and reconciliation commission.

    The Open Conspiracy (1928), the New World Order (1940)

    It’s all been arranged.

    • Replies: @S
  476. @Dmitry

    It’s an Italian communist newspaper, so what their funding?

    It’s a valid question regardless of whether they are commies or not. Really all media has a spin in some regard, even if unintentional. I actually find that some Lefty outlets like the WSWS have good coverage on certain issues. Right wing news/pundits will often times care little about corporate skulduggery since they default to “rah rah free markets”.

    I did follow up on some of the points in the article though and it seems to be factual. There is substantial foreign involvement in Ukrainian ag markets and the pressure from the IMF et al. to loosen nationalist flavored restrictions seems legit.

    https://ukrainland.com/

    I just turned this up and these guys spell it right out. LOL, imagine what the real players are cooking up.

    As far as I’m concerned anything that endangers national ownership of a critical resource like arable land is an issue that goes beyond Ukraine.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2021/07/19/china-buying-us-farms-foreign-purchase-499893

    A relatively weak and corrupt country like Ukraine is just going to be more exposed than a country like the US. Ukrainian land prices are also a bargain compared to just about anywhere especially since it is some of the most fertile land in the world and is conveniently located with a baseline stage of development already in place.

    But again, what these entities are envisioning is just another form of asset stripping which puts little back into the Ukraine. Current smaller Ukrainian owner operators get bought out at bargain rates and if they are lucky get a job working the fields they once owned, at least until the GPS guided combines arrive.

    I’m not sure what position you are discussing this from. It seems to me that you are saying that it should happen based on your preconceptions but not really engaging much with the pattern of the actual points.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Dmitry
  477. Beckow says:
    @Mikel

    There are a lot of plans, but it never works like that. Russia clearly thought that the Ukie army could collapse if an actual war starts – it didn’t happen. Today some enthusiasts think that Kiev can counter-attack in a meaningful way – it is unlikely, people don’t like to die. US wants a bloody quagmire for years, but that will also not happen – the situation is too intense to last much longer. We are close to the end.

    The Western financial support will go on no matter what the economic situation is – it is ‘funny’ money. It may be unpopular, but it actually has no impact on domestic economies. It is like giving friends in Kiev casino coupons to buy more drinks (weapons) – it is a circular process. The real issue for Europe will be how to get cheap enough energy and materials. It will trigger massive inflation, more than so far. Inflation is not all bad, it is a form of a jubilee for societies that have too much debt and cannot bring themselves to write it off. But inflation clears out everything and creates huge volatility – and eventually a turn-over of elites.

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @AnonfromTN
  478. Wokechoke says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Zulu is a/the great/est post war film.

    Best film of the 21st century?

    American Psycho. Though of course it is an adaptation.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  479. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    ww2 was a war over oil for petrol. Nothing more. You are quite correct.

  480. @Beckow

    When [they] were told that their privileged life was over, they went ballistic and screamed that they were ‘oppressed’. By that standard, everybody else also used to be ‘oppressed’.

    Precisely.

    They had been privileged for centuries without giving anything back. Perhaps it wasn’t everywhere the same, but in Russia most people were illiterate, especially peasants, and the Church wasn’t helping anybody.

    They did have schools, but for those who were going to become deacons, etc.

    Why not for everyone else?

    Like the Hebrew schools – the Jews did care for their children, and had one hundred percent literacy. So, what happened to the merciful Christians – weren’t they supposed to care for theirs as well?

    They didn’t care, and were helping the elites and the landlords to keep people ignorant. Not to mention that the Christian doctrine per se is rather dumbing down, than enlightening.

    This is an extremely malicious organization that should exist on voluntary donations, and not be supported and promoted by the state.

    Now we have the very same picture again – clerics on black Land Cruisers, proselitizing in schools, in the military, on TV, and not doing anything of what they are supposed to be doing, really.

    Haven’t heard any of them say anything about the pornography.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  481. S says:
    @S

    The previous post (#482) was posted mistakenly as it wasn’t finished. The Open Conspiracy (1928) and The New World Order (1940) were two books, amongst others, H G Wells had written.

    The movie clips are of the 1936 movie Things to Come, based upon Wells 1933 book, The Shape of Things to Come. The plot of the movie is one of future world war, global epidemic, societal collapse into a Mad Max world of localized warlords fighting for territory , and then the movie’s character, Mr Cabal, leading the forces of ‘a freemasonry of science’, establishing a new order across the globe.

    The point being, that this movie and many others like it the past 80 plus years, have gone a long way towards pre-conditioning people around the world to accept such a scenario. As both a former chief of US WWII era propaganda, and Freud’s nephew stated, movies are about the best vehicle for propaganda there is.

    • Replies: @songbird
  482. Wokechoke says:
    @Sean

    The main error that Russia made was lunging for Kiev. It put their invasion in the headlines and made every metropolitan denizen: Berliner Warsawa Parisian Londoner resident imagine the worst. Best move the Russians made was switch to the provinces, who gives a shit about Donbas?

    • Replies: @Sean
  483. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    “Tsarist system produced Lenins and Stalins”

    You are arguing that 1990s high murder rates created by wars between mafia are produced by “Soviet education”, etc, so you can argue these murder rates are the representative of Soviet culture.

    But then you would have to accept the same argument about the political elites, that Stalin is produced in a seminary, as a trainee in Georgia’s Russian Orthodox church. Lenin is produced by Imperial Kazan University.

    I have already addressed this. The difference is that people like Stalin or Lenin were renegades and enemies of the system that created them. In contrast, the architects of the Russian 1990s were elites n excellent standing.

    “failed to liquidate them in time”

    Now you begin to write like Stalin, who you supposedly oppose. But Stalin simply thought the same as you about this topic.

    It is the difference between executing a dangerous murderer, and the murderer killing people.

    Nothing in common, other than killing.

    Lenin and Stalin were brutal, bloody killers. The Tsar’s government was too kind, and incapable of killing them. The Russian people paid the price for that mildness.

    Even you were arguing about how Tolstoy, as if he was so different to Soviet culture. But if you read Tolstoy

    Did Tolstoy argue for forceful seizure of land from farmers?

    It’s not the same people, as they are only able to rebrand and downsize, when the old generation of bosses who actually believe Soviet ideology, has died.

    Yeltsin, Kravchuk, Gaidar, Sobchak, even Berezovsky were elites in good standing within the Soviet system while the Soviet system still existed.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  484. @Beckow

    The real issue for Europe will be how to get cheap enough energy and materials.

    This issue has long-term effects. German industry was competitive only with relatively cheap Russian natural gas and oil. Those days are over, no matter how often German industrialists send Schroeder to Moscow. As German industry loses its competitiveness, German factories will lose customers and eventually close. Germany will face significant unemployment and serious financial problems. It already had a negative monthly trade balance, for the first time in decades. Germany is the major donor in the EU. It will be f