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Here’s a new Open Thread for all of you. To minimize the load, please continue to limit your Tweets or place them under a MORE tag.

For those interested, here’s my lengthy new review article on the origins of Israel and the roots of the conflict with the Palestinians:

I’d also strongly recommend this important piece of investigative journalism by Max Blumenthal:

And this excellent discussion between Jeffrey Sachs and Rashid Khalidi on the history of the Israel/Palestine conflict:

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Gaza, Israel/Palestine, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. Bitcoin has taken a tumble.

    Cryptocurrencies and blockchains are nothing but gambling vehicles. Any intelligent country would ban them.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @anyone with a brain

    I wonder if Anatoly Karlin's prediction of hundreds of thousands of dollars per Ethereum by the 2030s will actually come to pass. He said that it's either that or bust. He also predicted the same for Urbit stars. Specifically, with each Urbit star being worth either hundreds of thousands of dollars by the 2030s or being worth absolutely nothing by that point in time.

    BitChute's stock could get a huge boost over time if it will become the official streaming channel of the network state Bitopia, which of course will be powered by Bitcoin.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @anyone with a brain

    It took a much bigger tumble from 60k dollars two years ago, this time last year it was $16k. 40k now, so it would have been a nice Christmas present last year, and a bad one the year before.

    ETH has halved in dollar terms since Christmas 2021 as well.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @LondonBob

  2. https://beff.substack.com/p/notes-on-eacc-principles-and-tenets
    Notes on e/acc principles and tenets

    [MORE]

    I believe the guy on the right is modafinil and the one on the left is lysergic acid diethylamide microdose mode. Those guys on paper are worth more than two Ron Unzes. Also they aren’t talking about Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, or Russia. : )

    • Thanks: LatW
    • Replies: @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    modafinil
     
    Is it ok to take modafinil if one doesn't have a medical diagnosis for it? As in, is it more or less dangerous / risky than, let's say, a Class B stimulant?

    microdose mode
     
    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.

    The one on the left looks like he's on some high quality stimulant (the eyes, lol, and touching his nose) or maybe nootropics, and the one on the right is mellow and looks a bit buzzed (the eyes, lol). At least it's good that he understands that "it's not ok to sell to North Korea". Responsible citizen.

    I like his ideology ("Defending the West").

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    , @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    It's the founder of Oculus VR. He's only 31.

    Do you see how he got Straussian at 17:50... almost uttered "globohomo" lol.

    , @Derer
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    I wasted only 15 minutes. The US military technology, the guy with the soiled chin talking about, failed against medieval Taliban for 20! years and is failing in Ukraine. These immature dudes try to make money by selling video but who will buy it.

    , @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Have you followed?

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/GA8Xq2sXQAAqWEd.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  3. @Emil Nikola Richard
    https://beff.substack.com/p/notes-on-eacc-principles-and-tenets
    Notes on e/acc principles and tenets

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONhhKQi0pU

    I believe the guy on the right is modafinil and the one on the left is lysergic acid diethylamide microdose mode. Those guys on paper are worth more than two Ron Unzes. Also they aren't talking about Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, or Russia. : )

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW, @Derer, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    modafinil

    Is it ok to take modafinil if one doesn’t have a medical diagnosis for it? As in, is it more or less dangerous / risky than, let’s say, a Class B stimulant?

    microdose mode

    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.

    The one on the left looks like he’s on some high quality stimulant (the eyes, lol, and touching his nose) or maybe nootropics, and the one on the right is mellow and looks a bit buzzed (the eyes, lol). At least it’s good that he understands that “it’s not ok to sell to North Korea”. Responsible citizen.

    I like his ideology (“Defending the West”).

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @LatW

    Huberman's lecture on stimulants is informative. Maybe go there. I remember modafinil is an expensive prescription drug. Also patients have very different effects from amphetamines. One ADHD patient may respond to 50 mg a day and a different patient with same age, sex, height, and weight may get no noticeable effect from 500 mg a day. I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.


    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.
     
    If you want to trip the dose is (from users' experience) 250-500 micrograms. If you want to microdose the number is 10-25 as I recall. Trip dosage is a reliable number. Erowid has the best data set. Self experimentation with these molecules is a lot more fun if you are 25 years old or younger.

    The occulus machine gives users nausea. It has no practical application I have ever heard about but it was successful at attracting stupid investors. I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.

    Replies: @LatW

  4. @Emil Nikola Richard
    https://beff.substack.com/p/notes-on-eacc-principles-and-tenets
    Notes on e/acc principles and tenets

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONhhKQi0pU

    I believe the guy on the right is modafinil and the one on the left is lysergic acid diethylamide microdose mode. Those guys on paper are worth more than two Ron Unzes. Also they aren't talking about Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, or Russia. : )

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW, @Derer, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    It’s the founder of Oculus VR. He’s only 31.

    Do you see how he got Straussian at 17:50… almost uttered “globohomo” lol.

  5. It is important to grasp Trump’s popularity with swing voters: (1)

    Poll: Donald Trump Leads Joe Biden Among Independents

    The survey provided a demographic breakdown, which showed Trump boasting an advantage among independent voters. He leads Biden by nine points there — 37 percent to 28 percent.

    When asked who they believe will be the winner of a presidential election between Biden and Trump, regardless of their personal preference, 44 percent, overall, said Trump, compared to 35 percent who said Biden. Independents are also more confident that Trump would win, 44 percent to Biden’s 25 percent.

    It is hard to predict who Trump will choose as his VP. There is no sign that Tucker Carlson wants the job. That flash story reads more as a way to infuriate the Leftoids into over reach.

    There was some thought that the GOP debates would yield a name. However, the only person who did well is Vivek, and he does not have enough of a track record. Fake Trump supporters will push warmongering RINOs like DeSantis or Nikki Haley.

    PEACE 😇
    ___________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/11/poll-donald-trump-leads-joe-biden-independents/

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @A123


    There was some thought that the GOP debates would yield a name. However, the only person who did well is Vivek, and he does not have enough of a track record. Fake Trump supporters will push warmongering RINOs like DeSantis or Nikki Haley.

     

    Elise Stefanik would be pretty good, no?

    https://media.wnyc.org/i/800/0/l/85/2021/05/rep1.jpeg

    https://i.insider.com/628277779147a30018b48d39?width=1136&format=jpeg

    "She's sophisticated. She's got class. Dangerous curves. And a whole lot of ass."

    From this song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujSA_Lv1cCY

    Replies: @Beckow

  6. Answers to questions you never thought to ask. — Can you build an absurdly large sword based on carbon fiber?

    PEACE 😇

  7. @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    modafinil
     
    Is it ok to take modafinil if one doesn't have a medical diagnosis for it? As in, is it more or less dangerous / risky than, let's say, a Class B stimulant?

    microdose mode
     
    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.

    The one on the left looks like he's on some high quality stimulant (the eyes, lol, and touching his nose) or maybe nootropics, and the one on the right is mellow and looks a bit buzzed (the eyes, lol). At least it's good that he understands that "it's not ok to sell to North Korea". Responsible citizen.

    I like his ideology ("Defending the West").

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Huberman’s lecture on stimulants is informative. Maybe go there. I remember modafinil is an expensive prescription drug. Also patients have very different effects from amphetamines. One ADHD patient may respond to 50 mg a day and a different patient with same age, sex, height, and weight may get no noticeable effect from 500 mg a day. I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.

    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.

    If you want to trip the dose is (from users’ experience) 250-500 micrograms. If you want to microdose the number is 10-25 as I recall. Trip dosage is a reliable number. Erowid has the best data set. Self experimentation with these molecules is a lot more fun if you are 25 years old or younger.

    The occulus machine gives users nausea. It has no practical application I have ever heard about but it was successful at attracting stupid investors. I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Thanks for the recommendation.


    I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.
     
    That's pretty easy then. I don't think it's any physician, but probably many. Adderall seems common even outside of Stanford. I wonder if it's the same kind of amphetamine that's in the so called "speed" (how the heck do they go to sleep even, they must take it early in the morning).

    The occulus machine gives users nausea.
     
    Yes, I've heard this is a common complaint and that there's an effort to build a better VR (haven't used it so can't judge).

    I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.
     
    Yes, it's part of Facebook / Meta now. It must have been bought during the tech bubble, so it's interesting whether it paid off for Meta. His current company is also getting insane funding, with a valuation of almost $10B. I thought the time of crazy valuations was over since a couple of years ago. Spotify lost most of its valuation (it was truly insane).

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.
     
    It might be ok if it's for self defense, although it doesn't really matter on the metaphysical level.

    What do you think about the end of this interview where he says he wants to sell his stuff to China and North Korea in the sense that he wants them to become like Japan and Germany? Isn't that super ambitious? But, you see, he's thinking in those terms. And that he'd be more proud of selling to (a defeated) Germany than to a (defeated) Russia. Wow.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  8. A counter to Washington Week with The Atlantic and Fareed Zakaria GPS:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12122023-ukraines-future-oped/

  9. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @LatW

    Huberman's lecture on stimulants is informative. Maybe go there. I remember modafinil is an expensive prescription drug. Also patients have very different effects from amphetamines. One ADHD patient may respond to 50 mg a day and a different patient with same age, sex, height, and weight may get no noticeable effect from 500 mg a day. I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.


    I wonder how that is determined, namely, what makes it micro and how do they know it is enough.
     
    If you want to trip the dose is (from users' experience) 250-500 micrograms. If you want to microdose the number is 10-25 as I recall. Trip dosage is a reliable number. Erowid has the best data set. Self experimentation with these molecules is a lot more fun if you are 25 years old or younger.

    The occulus machine gives users nausea. It has no practical application I have ever heard about but it was successful at attracting stupid investors. I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.

    Replies: @LatW

    Thanks for the recommendation.

    I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.

    That’s pretty easy then. I don’t think it’s any physician, but probably many. Adderall seems common even outside of Stanford. I wonder if it’s the same kind of amphetamine that’s in the so called “speed” (how the heck do they go to sleep even, they must take it early in the morning).

    The occulus machine gives users nausea.

    Yes, I’ve heard this is a common complaint and that there’s an effort to build a better VR (haven’t used it so can’t judge).

    I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.

    Yes, it’s part of Facebook / Meta now. It must have been bought during the tech bubble, so it’s interesting whether it paid off for Meta. His current company is also getting insane funding, with a valuation of almost $10B. I thought the time of crazy valuations was over since a couple of years ago. Spotify lost most of its valuation (it was truly insane).

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.

    It might be ok if it’s for self defense, although it doesn’t really matter on the metaphysical level.

    What do you think about the end of this interview where he says he wants to sell his stuff to China and North Korea in the sense that he wants them to become like Japan and Germany? Isn’t that super ambitious? But, you see, he’s thinking in those terms. And that he’d be more proud of selling to (a defeated) Germany than to a (defeated) Russia. Wow.

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    Would you enjoy hanging out with the murderers of your family members?
     
    I thought you were on good terms with your Jewish neighbours?

    They are certainly not an easy people to manage, one really needs to learn to handle them when living together.
     
  10. @A123
    It is important to grasp Trump's popularity with swing voters: (1)

    Poll: Donald Trump Leads Joe Biden Among Independents

     

    The survey provided a demographic breakdown, which showed Trump boasting an advantage among independent voters. He leads Biden by nine points there — 37 percent to 28 percent.
    ...
    When asked who they believe will be the winner of a presidential election between Biden and Trump, regardless of their personal preference, 44 percent, overall, said Trump, compared to 35 percent who said Biden. Independents are also more confident that Trump would win, 44 percent to Biden’s 25 percent.
     
    It is hard to predict who Trump will choose as his VP. There is no sign that Tucker Carlson wants the job. That flash story reads more as a way to infuriate the Leftoids into over reach.

    There was some thought that the GOP debates would yield a name. However, the only person who did well is Vivek, and he does not have enough of a track record. Fake Trump supporters will push warmongering RINOs like DeSantis or Nikki Haley.

    PEACE 😇
    ___________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/11/poll-donald-trump-leads-joe-biden-independents/

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    There was some thought that the GOP debates would yield a name. However, the only person who did well is Vivek, and he does not have enough of a track record. Fake Trump supporters will push warmongering RINOs like DeSantis or Nikki Haley.

    Elise Stefanik would be pretty good, no?

    https://i.insider.com/628277779147a30018b48d39?width=1136&format=jpeg

    “She’s sophisticated. She’s got class. Dangerous curves. And a whole lot of ass.”

    From this song:

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mr. XYZ

    A low-class descendant of one of my people and a total fake. She is reading scripts like an obedient squaw who wants to get that extra bowl off porridge.

    Those curves are going to get a lot worse, I would pass...

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

  11. @anyone with a brain
    Bitcoin has taken a tumble.

    Cryptocurrencies and blockchains are nothing but gambling vehicles. Any intelligent country would ban them.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @YetAnotherAnon

    I wonder if Anatoly Karlin’s prediction of hundreds of thousands of dollars per Ethereum by the 2030s will actually come to pass. He said that it’s either that or bust. He also predicted the same for Urbit stars. Specifically, with each Urbit star being worth either hundreds of thousands of dollars by the 2030s or being worth absolutely nothing by that point in time.

    BitChute’s stock could get a huge boost over time if it will become the official streaming channel of the network state Bitopia, which of course will be powered by Bitcoin.

  12. An article about life in occupied Melitopol, in the Glorious Russian Reich:

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/06/11/europe/ukraine-life-under-russian-occupation-melitopol-intl-cmd/index.html

    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. XYZ

    A private reply regarding -

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12122023-ukraines-future-oped/

    "Spot on. The situation is even more dire for Ukraine's criminal leadership, and even more tragic for the people for whom they have no regard.

    In addition, there are many Ukrainian troops surrendering in spite of the fact that they have neo-Nazi Banderites and foreign mercenaries planted in each unit to shoot anyone that wants to surrender. I've seen enough videos of Ukrainian soldiers who survived complaining about this.

    Many in Ukraine are no longer watching the state TV - as you know, all but regime-run stations have been banned - and they get their news from other sources, like Telegram, etc. Ukrainians (normal ones) like Uri Podolyaka and Michael Onufrienko have great programs, and broadcast mostly from Crimea.

    Alexander Mercouris is another great resource - a Greek in Britain - with Russian friends who broadcasts in English...

    The truth is coming out."

    , @Gerard1234
    @Mr. XYZ


    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.
     
    Just a reminder (shithead) that the Poles fought far more enthusiastically and intensively FOR Nazi Germany from 1939-45, than they did in "resisting" for 2 weeks in September 1939. Huge numbers of Poles fought for Nazi Germany. No real surprise as there was plenty of good will from 1933-39 in addition to the Poles loser/inferiority complex .......as the Nazi government ministers favourite holiday destination was Poland and, of course, Poland was Hitlers most loyal ally from 1933-39

    Replies: @ShortOnTime

  13. @Mr. XYZ
    An article about life in occupied Melitopol, in the Glorious Russian Reich:

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/06/11/europe/ukraine-life-under-russian-occupation-melitopol-intl-cmd/index.html

    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Gerard1234

    A private reply regarding –

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12122023-ukraines-future-oped/

    “Spot on. The situation is even more dire for Ukraine’s criminal leadership, and even more tragic for the people for whom they have no regard.

    In addition, there are many Ukrainian troops surrendering in spite of the fact that they have neo-Nazi Banderites and foreign mercenaries planted in each unit to shoot anyone that wants to surrender. I’ve seen enough videos of Ukrainian soldiers who survived complaining about this.

    Many in Ukraine are no longer watching the state TV – as you know, all but regime-run stations have been banned – and they get their news from other sources, like Telegram, etc. Ukrainians (normal ones) like Uri Podolyaka and Michael Onufrienko have great programs, and broadcast mostly from Crimea.

    Alexander Mercouris is another great resource – a Greek in Britain – with Russian friends who broadcasts in English…

    The truth is coming out.”

  14. I’ve got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line? And, if so, could Germany and Austria-Hungary arm the Ottomans enough and build up the Ottoman military enough up to the point that the Ottoman military can do to Russia what Ukraine did to Russia in the Russo-Ukrainian War in real life? As in, ensure that Russia walks away with nothing other than some modest gains, but with the core of the Ottoman Empire remaining intact and with the Ottoman Empire itself remaining very strong.

    (Note: During WWI in real life, the Ottoman Empire was not that strong. But if the Ottoman Empire will aggressively build up its military with the help of the Germanic powers over the next 10-15 years or more, then it could be in a much better position in a future hypothetical war against Russia. Russia would have also aggressively trounced Ukraine in 2014 in real life, after all. But by 2022, it couldn’t even conquer Kharkiv or Odessa or Mykolayiv or hold onto Kherson.)

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @Mr. XYZ

    Maybe one could argue that the Russian Empire would be more willing to spend huge amounts of money on a real war than Putin's Russia would be, and that the coalition opposing it would not be quite as formidable as NATO would be, though still, it's worth noting that Britain can side with Germany and Austria-Hungary in regards to helping the Ottoman Empire in this scenario if, without WWI breaking out by then, it will come to re-perceive Russia as a huge threat. Britain plus Germany plus Austria-Hungary would have quite a lot of economic power combined. Though the US won't be aiding them. And France could possibly be aiding its ally Russia, though I suppose that France could also be doing what China is doing in the Russo-Ukrainian War in real life and limit its aid to Russia to relatively mundane things.

    , @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    I’ve got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line
     
    I think there’s something to be said for historical records, and Russia had a good record of beating the Ottomans. Since 1768 it beat them in every war other than the Crimean War in which the Ottomans themselves were beaten by the Russians, but the Russians were defeated by the Ottomans’ British and French allies. So it would likely have won in another war with them.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  15. @Mr. XYZ
    I've got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line? And, if so, could Germany and Austria-Hungary arm the Ottomans enough and build up the Ottoman military enough up to the point that the Ottoman military can do to Russia what Ukraine did to Russia in the Russo-Ukrainian War in real life? As in, ensure that Russia walks away with nothing other than some modest gains, but with the core of the Ottoman Empire remaining intact and with the Ottoman Empire itself remaining very strong.

    (Note: During WWI in real life, the Ottoman Empire was not that strong. But if the Ottoman Empire will aggressively build up its military with the help of the Germanic powers over the next 10-15 years or more, then it could be in a much better position in a future hypothetical war against Russia. Russia would have also aggressively trounced Ukraine in 2014 in real life, after all. But by 2022, it couldn't even conquer Kharkiv or Odessa or Mykolayiv or hold onto Kherson.)

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    Maybe one could argue that the Russian Empire would be more willing to spend huge amounts of money on a real war than Putin’s Russia would be, and that the coalition opposing it would not be quite as formidable as NATO would be, though still, it’s worth noting that Britain can side with Germany and Austria-Hungary in regards to helping the Ottoman Empire in this scenario if, without WWI breaking out by then, it will come to re-perceive Russia as a huge threat. Britain plus Germany plus Austria-Hungary would have quite a lot of economic power combined. Though the US won’t be aiding them. And France could possibly be aiding its ally Russia, though I suppose that France could also be doing what China is doing in the Russo-Ukrainian War in real life and limit its aid to Russia to relatively mundane things.

  16. Why did it take so long for wine to displace beer in Egypt? (4th century AD)

    And how do Egyptians track on genetic alcohol tolerance? Same as Greeks?

  17. @Emil Nikola Richard
    https://beff.substack.com/p/notes-on-eacc-principles-and-tenets
    Notes on e/acc principles and tenets

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONhhKQi0pU

    I believe the guy on the right is modafinil and the one on the left is lysergic acid diethylamide microdose mode. Those guys on paper are worth more than two Ron Unzes. Also they aren't talking about Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, or Russia. : )

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW, @Derer, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I wasted only 15 minutes. The US military technology, the guy with the soiled chin talking about, failed against medieval Taliban for 20! years and is failing in Ukraine. These immature dudes try to make money by selling video but who will buy it.

  18. @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Thanks for the recommendation.


    I have previously heard him mention offhand that 2/3 Stanford students are on modafinil or adderall or ritalin but this tidbit is not in that presentation. All you have to do to get a prescription is tell an acceptable story to a physician. Maybe not any physician. But a large fraction of them.
     
    That's pretty easy then. I don't think it's any physician, but probably many. Adderall seems common even outside of Stanford. I wonder if it's the same kind of amphetamine that's in the so called "speed" (how the heck do they go to sleep even, they must take it early in the morning).

    The occulus machine gives users nausea.
     
    Yes, I've heard this is a common complaint and that there's an effort to build a better VR (haven't used it so can't judge).

    I seem to remember facebook buying his company for hundreds millions dollars.
     
    Yes, it's part of Facebook / Meta now. It must have been bought during the tech bubble, so it's interesting whether it paid off for Meta. His current company is also getting insane funding, with a valuation of almost $10B. I thought the time of crazy valuations was over since a couple of years ago. Spotify lost most of its valuation (it was truly insane).

    Making machines for killing people destroys souls in those people who possess one.
     
    It might be ok if it's for self defense, although it doesn't really matter on the metaphysical level.

    What do you think about the end of this interview where he says he wants to sell his stuff to China and North Korea in the sense that he wants them to become like Japan and Germany? Isn't that super ambitious? But, you see, he's thinking in those terms. And that he'd be more proud of selling to (a defeated) Germany than to a (defeated) Russia. Wow.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Would you enjoy hanging out with the murderers of your family members?

    I thought you were on good terms with your Jewish neighbours?

    They are certainly not an easy people to manage, one really needs to learn to handle them when living together.

  19. @Emil Nikola Richard
    https://beff.substack.com/p/notes-on-eacc-principles-and-tenets
    Notes on e/acc principles and tenets

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONhhKQi0pU

    I believe the guy on the right is modafinil and the one on the left is lysergic acid diethylamide microdose mode. Those guys on paper are worth more than two Ron Unzes. Also they aren't talking about Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, or Russia. : )

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW, @Derer, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Have you followed?

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    No. Is there a big commotion around e/acc in reddit Baltic sea?

    My main interest in the e/acc is I have always been interested in Nick Land's writing. My main interest in the video was rich guys on drugs which is always funny.

  20. The Baltic States acting as sock puppets in Europe against China is probably the most pathetic display of political stupidity and flunkeyism I have ever seen. It’s not just smarter and more capable people would play off the Chinese against the Americans to extract concessions for their own benefit and vice versa.

    Want a China bad statement? We could use a new football stadium. What’s really rather sad is the reality that their countries are facing eminent extinction within a single generation. Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, etc will cease to exist by mid century as the young and capable decamp for Germany/“The North East”(Costco is truly genius and very affordable annual membership is only $50, you quickly make that back in savings. I love those large frozen Alaskan salmon and cod packets) in droves and all that will be left is a retirement home masquerading as a country.

    Spending your remaining political time calling Russia names is bad enough, but spending it calling China, a country you have zero history or interaction with at the behest of your superiors, while your country disappears year by year in front of your very eyes due to the neoliberal economic and political system you seek to uphold is something else.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Why are you so angry? Did something new happen (besides the old Taiwan economic representation incident)? I haven't noticed much China hate recently.


    more capable people would play off the Chinese against the Americans to extract concessions for their own benefit and vice versa.
     
    This kind of an approach may make some sense, but it is not very dignifying. Why not just try to have good relations with both?
    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    China, a country you have zero history or interaction
     
    Not true, Chinese and Latvians fought together for the Reds (not a flattering depiction here though)

    https://i.postimg.cc/7YNg709Q/Sukuri-nshotto-1.png

    https://www.rbth.com/history/333135-how-chinese-soldiers-helped-bolsheviks

    Both Chinese and Japanese also supported the Whites and Czech Legion

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Kaartje_amerikanen_in_Rusland-1-.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  21. Asiatics > Unhinged Bear-Slayer anti-East bullshit.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    South Korea is one of the few deposits for this type of ammo in the world, and, yes, they do a good job supplying.

    Is China giving anything to Russia? Ukrainian soldiers said they saw Asian characters on some items they found on the Russian troops (wasn't clear if those were Korean (possibly from N.Korea) or Chinese).


    Asiatics > Unhinged Bear-Slayer anti-East bullshit.
     
    To be fully accurate though, the Bear-Slayer epic is set during the Northern Crusades and the foe is from the West. The final struggle takes place between the Bear-Slayer and a German crusading knight, called the Black Knight. One has to understand the late 19th century context (when the epic poem was written).

    In the end, they fight on a cliff and both fall down into the raging river. The Bear-Slayer's wife watches from the castle and, as he perishes, she takes her life. The vision of their struggle still appears even in the later eras...

    Time from time, boatmen as they venture along the Daugava river,
    In the middle of the night, behold two men, fighting on a steep cliff.
    In the meanwhile, in the castle ruins, a small light is seen flickering.

    The two men, while wrestling, approach the edge of the cliff,
    When, finally, they fall into the depths of the river.
    A lamenting cry reverberates inside the castle, the little light burns out.

    It is the Bear-Slayer who is fighting there, still with the overseas foe.
    Laimdota watches from the castle, waiting, who will triumph.
    But still, the day will come, when he will push his foe down, alone.
    And drown him in the maelstrom.

    Then new times will dawn for the people - then their freedom will be born.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  22. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    Asiatics > Unhinged Bear-Slayer anti-East bullshit.

    https://twitter.com/mason_8718/status/1732748640907874447

    Replies: @LatW

    South Korea is one of the few deposits for this type of ammo in the world, and, yes, they do a good job supplying.

    [MORE]

    Is China giving anything to Russia? Ukrainian soldiers said they saw Asian characters on some items they found on the Russian troops (wasn’t clear if those were Korean (possibly from N.Korea) or Chinese).

    Asiatics > Unhinged Bear-Slayer anti-East bullshit.

    To be fully accurate though, the Bear-Slayer epic is set during the Northern Crusades and the foe is from the West. The final struggle takes place between the Bear-Slayer and a German crusading knight, called the Black Knight. One has to understand the late 19th century context (when the epic poem was written).

    In the end, they fight on a cliff and both fall down into the raging river. The Bear-Slayer’s wife watches from the castle and, as he perishes, she takes her life. The vision of their struggle still appears even in the later eras…

    Time from time, boatmen as they venture along the Daugava river,
    In the middle of the night, behold two men, fighting on a steep cliff.
    In the meanwhile, in the castle ruins, a small light is seen flickering.

    The two men, while wrestling, approach the edge of the cliff,
    When, finally, they fall into the depths of the river.
    A lamenting cry reverberates inside the castle, the little light burns out.

    It is the Bear-Slayer who is fighting there, still with the overseas foe.
    Laimdota watches from the castle, waiting, who will triumph.
    But still, the day will come, when he will push his foe down, alone.
    And drown him in the maelstrom.

    Then new times will dawn for the people – then their freedom will be born.

    • Thanks: S, Mr. XYZ
    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    We truly live in a post-historical era. An objective lesson of the first and second world wars were that the petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe were dangerous volatile things capable of generating crisis and violence yet of marginal strategic utility and that the optimal policy was to avoid strategic entanglements of any kind for the major Western powers.

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe and making Poland and Latvia the new pillars of sound European decision making. The Eastern expansion of the EU and Nato will go down historically as to what doomed the grand vision of a peaceful and United Europe.

    The old saying about Konraad Adenauer muttering about Asiatics every time his train crossed east past the Elbe carried with it more than a little truth and the observation of the conservative reactionaries about the East were more prescient than the Liberal eurocrats who put out policy white papers about how Kosovo is the most law abiding nation in the Balkans.


    they need to post something negative about our people
     

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously
     


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRBkf2egfZ6C2QyQL68p6JyAAJwOFNfXld55g&usqp.jpg

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW

  23. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    The Baltic States acting as sock puppets in Europe against China is probably the most pathetic display of political stupidity and flunkeyism I have ever seen. It's not just smarter and more capable people would play off the Chinese against the Americans to extract concessions for their own benefit and vice versa.

    Want a China bad statement? We could use a new football stadium. What's really rather sad is the reality that their countries are facing eminent extinction within a single generation. Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, etc will cease to exist by mid century as the young and capable decamp for Germany/“The North East"(Costco is truly genius and very affordable annual membership is only $50, you quickly make that back in savings. I love those large frozen Alaskan salmon and cod packets) in droves and all that will be left is a retirement home masquerading as a country.

    Spending your remaining political time calling Russia names is bad enough, but spending it calling China, a country you have zero history or interaction with at the behest of your superiors, while your country disappears year by year in front of your very eyes due to the neoliberal economic and political system you seek to uphold is something else.

    Replies: @LatW, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    [MORE]

    Why are you so angry? Did something new happen (besides the old Taiwan economic representation incident)? I haven’t noticed much China hate recently.

    more capable people would play off the Chinese against the Americans to extract concessions for their own benefit and vice versa.

    This kind of an approach may make some sense, but it is not very dignifying. Why not just try to have good relations with both?

  24. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    South Korea is one of the few deposits for this type of ammo in the world, and, yes, they do a good job supplying.

    Is China giving anything to Russia? Ukrainian soldiers said they saw Asian characters on some items they found on the Russian troops (wasn't clear if those were Korean (possibly from N.Korea) or Chinese).


    Asiatics > Unhinged Bear-Slayer anti-East bullshit.
     
    To be fully accurate though, the Bear-Slayer epic is set during the Northern Crusades and the foe is from the West. The final struggle takes place between the Bear-Slayer and a German crusading knight, called the Black Knight. One has to understand the late 19th century context (when the epic poem was written).

    In the end, they fight on a cliff and both fall down into the raging river. The Bear-Slayer's wife watches from the castle and, as he perishes, she takes her life. The vision of their struggle still appears even in the later eras...

    Time from time, boatmen as they venture along the Daugava river,
    In the middle of the night, behold two men, fighting on a steep cliff.
    In the meanwhile, in the castle ruins, a small light is seen flickering.

    The two men, while wrestling, approach the edge of the cliff,
    When, finally, they fall into the depths of the river.
    A lamenting cry reverberates inside the castle, the little light burns out.

    It is the Bear-Slayer who is fighting there, still with the overseas foe.
    Laimdota watches from the castle, waiting, who will triumph.
    But still, the day will come, when he will push his foe down, alone.
    And drown him in the maelstrom.

    Then new times will dawn for the people - then their freedom will be born.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    We truly live in a post-historical era. An objective lesson of the first and second world wars were that the petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe were dangerous volatile things capable of generating crisis and violence yet of marginal strategic utility and that the optimal policy was to avoid strategic entanglements of any kind for the major Western powers.

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe and making Poland and Latvia the new pillars of sound European decision making. The Eastern expansion of the EU and Nato will go down historically as to what doomed the grand vision of a peaceful and United Europe.

    The old saying about Konraad Adenauer muttering about Asiatics every time his train crossed east past the Elbe carried with it more than a little truth and the observation of the conservative reactionaries about the East were more prescient than the Liberal eurocrats who put out policy white papers about how Kosovo is the most law abiding nation in the Balkans.

    they need to post something negative about our people

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe
     
    I wouldn't say that any EU country fully has this - not even Hungary. Most have a parliamentary system which includes leftist liberal parties that typically fight displays of ethnic nationalism. Poland and the Baltics have a little bit of nationalism, but they are still "washed" in liberalism at the end of the day.

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe
     
    How have they been kicked out of Europe when they are the most powerful EU countries? Are you saying their governments have no agency?

    peaceful and United Europe
     
    Europe is not disunited, it just needs to become stronger.

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously
     

    OMG, you completely misunderstood! I wasn't really talking about the racial aspect here. Isn't this true though - that some Northern Euro women occasionally do this? There is a type - the "Latin lover" that some women like (and, in fact, they may marry one of them). And some go for even darker. Listen, they're not going to marry someone in a culturally very different country that they had a short fling with. That was what was meant.

    When I mentioned "Asiatics" in the other thread that was actually prompted by another wrongful and redundant statement by Beckow. And there are Buryat soldiers in the Russian occupation forces. The Buryat are exploited and taken advantage of. (!!!)

    The Chechens, however, do have agency (although I would not deem them "Asiatics" or Asian, of course).

    This does not apply to most Asian people, omg. And I've had nothing but positive experience with Koreans, Japanese and Chinese. Hard working and smart. So I apologize if I came off as not friendly towards Asian people. I felt attacked by your comments and may have become defensive on some occasions.

    , @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    By the way, does anybody in either Korea feel any qualms about supplying weapons? After all that is meant to kill two closely related groups of Slavs. This is macabre.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

  25. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    We truly live in a post-historical era. An objective lesson of the first and second world wars were that the petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe were dangerous volatile things capable of generating crisis and violence yet of marginal strategic utility and that the optimal policy was to avoid strategic entanglements of any kind for the major Western powers.

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe and making Poland and Latvia the new pillars of sound European decision making. The Eastern expansion of the EU and Nato will go down historically as to what doomed the grand vision of a peaceful and United Europe.

    The old saying about Konraad Adenauer muttering about Asiatics every time his train crossed east past the Elbe carried with it more than a little truth and the observation of the conservative reactionaries about the East were more prescient than the Liberal eurocrats who put out policy white papers about how Kosovo is the most law abiding nation in the Balkans.


    they need to post something negative about our people
     

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously
     


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRBkf2egfZ6C2QyQL68p6JyAAJwOFNfXld55g&usqp.jpg

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW

    petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe

    I wouldn’t say that any EU country fully has this – not even Hungary. Most have a parliamentary system which includes leftist liberal parties that typically fight displays of ethnic nationalism. Poland and the Baltics have a little bit of nationalism, but they are still “washed” in liberalism at the end of the day.

    [MORE]

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe

    How have they been kicked out of Europe when they are the most powerful EU countries? Are you saying their governments have no agency?

    peaceful and United Europe

    Europe is not disunited, it just needs to become stronger.

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously

    OMG, you completely misunderstood! I wasn’t really talking about the racial aspect here. Isn’t this true though – that some Northern Euro women occasionally do this? There is a type – the “Latin lover” that some women like (and, in fact, they may marry one of them). And some go for even darker. Listen, they’re not going to marry someone in a culturally very different country that they had a short fling with. That was what was meant.

    When I mentioned “Asiatics” in the other thread that was actually prompted by another wrongful and redundant statement by Beckow. And there are Buryat soldiers in the Russian occupation forces. The Buryat are exploited and taken advantage of. (!!!)

    The Chechens, however, do have agency (although I would not deem them “Asiatics” or Asian, of course).

    This does not apply to most Asian people, omg. And I’ve had nothing but positive experience with Koreans, Japanese and Chinese. Hard working and smart. So I apologize if I came off as not friendly towards Asian people. I felt attacked by your comments and may have become defensive on some occasions.

  26. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    We truly live in a post-historical era. An objective lesson of the first and second world wars were that the petit nationalisms of Eastern Europe were dangerous volatile things capable of generating crisis and violence yet of marginal strategic utility and that the optimal policy was to avoid strategic entanglements of any kind for the major Western powers.

    This has been completely abandoned in favor of kicking France and Germany out of Europe and making Poland and Latvia the new pillars of sound European decision making. The Eastern expansion of the EU and Nato will go down historically as to what doomed the grand vision of a peaceful and United Europe.

    The old saying about Konraad Adenauer muttering about Asiatics every time his train crossed east past the Elbe carried with it more than a little truth and the observation of the conservative reactionaries about the East were more prescient than the Liberal eurocrats who put out policy white papers about how Kosovo is the most law abiding nation in the Balkans.


    they need to post something negative about our people
     

    Some Northern Euro women sometimes go south for that, so they can slut it up in a foreign place where nobody knows them. They would not marry you or even date you seriously
     


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRBkf2egfZ6C2QyQL68p6JyAAJwOFNfXld55g&usqp.jpg

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW

    By the way, does anybody in either Korea feel any qualms about supplying weapons? After all that is meant to kill two closely related groups of Slavs. This is macabre.

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    This is a Brothers War in more than one sense. As an outsider you will never understand how truly macabre it is.

    Replies: @QCIC

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry. Later it was Stalin who gave Kim the go-ahead and T-34s to invade ROK

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Soviet_Amphibious_Landing_Chongjin_1945.png
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seishin_Operation

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Kisabur%C5%8D_Ohara%2C_Europe_and_Asia_Octopus_Map%2C_1904_Cornell_CUL_PJM_1145_01.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @LatW

  27. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    By the way, does anybody in either Korea feel any qualms about supplying weapons? After all that is meant to kill two closely related groups of Slavs. This is macabre.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    This is a Brothers War in more than one sense. As an outsider you will never understand how truly macabre it is.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The military in both Koreas probably feel like they are next. If NATO were to be successful in Ukraine the USA might use South Korea to pressure North Korea and ultimately China and Russia. Besides, North Korea can use the money and South Korea is probably bored.

    Shells like that are easy to make. The lack of ammo from the West is a sign of lack of will, not of ability. I wonder which country will buy the 155 ammo from Russia?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  28. @anyone with a brain
    Bitcoin has taken a tumble.

    Cryptocurrencies and blockchains are nothing but gambling vehicles. Any intelligent country would ban them.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @YetAnotherAnon

    It took a much bigger tumble from 60k dollars two years ago, this time last year it was $16k. 40k now, so it would have been a nice Christmas present last year, and a bad one the year before.

    ETH has halved in dollar terms since Christmas 2021 as well.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I recently re-watched the Sam Bankman Fried presentation on Bankless. It was four days before Coindesk spilled the beans on the FTX books and six days before CZ did the demolition job. I couldn't get much past the 30 minute mark but it is perhaps one of the ten all time internet hits so far. Aye aye aye aye aye aye aye.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ytaa_5liwMA

    He is going to be locked up for a long time but they haven't done the sentence yet.

    Replies: @Sean

    , @LondonBob
    @YetAnotherAnon

    A lot of the alt coins are worthless now, as they all are ultimately. Also have to remember that a lot of people have had their 'coins' stolen too.

    Interesting question is who invented bitcoin, I would guess either the intelligence agencies, I think the hash things was patented by the NSA, or Paul Le Roux. Bitcoin has a purpose as such, Nikolai Mushegian was right, so I guess it will hang around.

  29. Political implications will be interesting, if Iran does send a man into space by 2029, as planned, even setting aside nuclear or other weapons potential.

    Imagine being beaten by Iran.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @songbird

    Persia was once a mighty civilisation and empire, but that was a fair while ago.

    I wonder why Wiki doesn't call it the First Persian Empire, as it certainly would have been in older history books?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achaemenid_Empire


    In the modern era, the Achaemenid Empire has been recognized for its imposition of a successful model of centralized, bureaucratic administration; its multicultural policy; building complex infrastructure, such as road systems and an organized postal system; the use of official languages across its territories; and the development of civil services, including its possession of a large, professional army. Its advancements inspired the implementation of similar styles of governance by a variety of later empires.

     

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @songbird

    Imagine just how much more POWER Iran would have if it opened its doors wide open to Afghanistan's, Iraq's, and even Pakistan's human capital!

    Replies: @songbird

  30. @songbird
    Political implications will be interesting, if Iran does send a man into space by 2029, as planned, even setting aside nuclear or other weapons potential.

    Imagine being beaten by Iran.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Mr. XYZ

    Persia was once a mighty civilisation and empire, but that was a fair while ago.

    I wonder why Wiki doesn’t call it the First Persian Empire, as it certainly would have been in older history books?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achaemenid_Empire

    In the modern era, the Achaemenid Empire has been recognized for its imposition of a successful model of centralized, bureaucratic administration; its multicultural policy; building complex infrastructure, such as road systems and an organized postal system; the use of official languages across its territories; and the development of civil services, including its possession of a large, professional army. Its advancements inspired the implementation of similar styles of governance by a variety of later empires.

  31. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    This is a Brothers War in more than one sense. As an outsider you will never understand how truly macabre it is.

    Replies: @QCIC

    The military in both Koreas probably feel like they are next. If NATO were to be successful in Ukraine the USA might use South Korea to pressure North Korea and ultimately China and Russia. Besides, North Korea can use the money and South Korea is probably bored.

    Shells like that are easy to make. The lack of ammo from the West is a sign of lack of will, not of ability. I wonder which country will buy the 155 ammo from Russia?

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @QCIC

    I think this is Fake News, but I'm interested in your opinion.



    https://twitter.com/alexbward/status/1734892249257738420

    Replies: @A123, @Emil Nikola Richard, @QCIC

  32. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Have you followed?

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/GA8Xq2sXQAAqWEd.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    No. Is there a big commotion around e/acc in reddit Baltic sea?

    My main interest in the e/acc is I have always been interested in Nick Land’s writing. My main interest in the video was rich guys on drugs which is always funny.

  33. The Government is pissed at Assange and Snowden for exposing their Ted Bundy like alter-egos! Political opperative, rape crisis line worker, board member of Crime Prevention Task Force by day, Serial Killer and Serial Necropheliac by night! Face it Evil Trio – Government, Healthcare sector which includes Mental Healthcare and Big Pharma, and Orwellian Surveillance State! You all have Alter-Egos that are all Sadistic cold blooded monsters like Ted Bundy! You are guilty of crimes against humanity, Treason, Terrorism, Medical Fraud, Medical Torture, Munchausen Syndrome tactics which are pre-meditated mal-practice, and Seditious Conspiracy to Violate Constitutional Rights of the Established Authority which is We the People, the Sovereign Citizens, and Qualified Electors! It is totally impossible to peacefully co-exist with you! You have all waged a cowardly, undeclared war on We the People, because you want us to be unable to defend ourselves against your tyranny, treason, crimes against humanity, mass murder, organized crime sprees, and kleptocracy! Face it Evil Trio! You are prison material like Ted Bundy and the Manson Family! You are no better than Ted Bundy and the Manson Family Evil Trio! Face it Evil Trio! You belong in federal pennitentiaries for life like Ted Bundy and the Manson Family! I know that Leslie Van Houten was released from prison, but she should not have been because of the trauma to the murder victims family members that pleaded to the court not to release her.

  34. @Mr. XYZ
    @A123


    There was some thought that the GOP debates would yield a name. However, the only person who did well is Vivek, and he does not have enough of a track record. Fake Trump supporters will push warmongering RINOs like DeSantis or Nikki Haley.

     

    Elise Stefanik would be pretty good, no?

    https://media.wnyc.org/i/800/0/l/85/2021/05/rep1.jpeg

    https://i.insider.com/628277779147a30018b48d39?width=1136&format=jpeg

    "She's sophisticated. She's got class. Dangerous curves. And a whole lot of ass."

    From this song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujSA_Lv1cCY

    Replies: @Beckow

    A low-class descendant of one of my people and a total fake. She is reading scripts like an obedient squaw who wants to get that extra bowl off porridge.

    Those curves are going to get a lot worse, I would pass…

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @Beckow


    Those curves are going to get a lot worse
     
    Reminds me of an old Soviet-era joke.
    A woman is about to yield to a guy, but before she undresses, she says:
    - My dear, I have to warn you. Before I met you, I loved another guy very much and have tattooed his portrait on my right breast.
    - OK.
    - You know, I loved yet another guy very much and have tattooed his portrait on my left breast.
    The guy starts guffawing.
    - Why are you laughing?
    - I just imagined what their faces will look like in 20 years.
  35. @Beckow
    @Mr. XYZ

    A low-class descendant of one of my people and a total fake. She is reading scripts like an obedient squaw who wants to get that extra bowl off porridge.

    Those curves are going to get a lot worse, I would pass...

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    Those curves are going to get a lot worse

    Reminds me of an old Soviet-era joke.
    A woman is about to yield to a guy, but before she undresses, she says:
    – My dear, I have to warn you. Before I met you, I loved another guy very much and have tattooed his portrait on my right breast.
    – OK.
    – You know, I loved yet another guy very much and have tattooed his portrait on my left breast.
    The guy starts guffawing.
    – Why are you laughing?
    – I just imagined what their faces will look like in 20 years.

  36. From the onset of Covid-19 medical fraud since it was a fictious virus, every Triage worker i the Evil Trio just decided the hell with everyone else, just wanted to save themselves, even if it entailed medical fraud, pre-meditated mal-practice, mass murder, shutting down the entire country resulting in many destroyed small businesses, families, jobs, home owners, and even if it entailed destroying every child in the entire country. It was all worth it to them.

    In the cowardly undeclared war waged against We the People by the Evil Trio, like Ted Bundy, they want us to be helpless to stop their sadistic crimes against us, like Ted Bundy, the Evil Trio Vampires have sucked the life right out of us in exchange for ever lasting life in the alternate universe of the surveillance state, all captives of Hotel California Silicon Valley. It is not what we asked for. It is not what we bargained for. It is not what we dreamed of. It is not what we hoped for. The exchange of the perfect American dream recreated as a chatbot created by a sick thief that stole our lives. Like Ted Bundy they want us to be unable to refuse them, unable to fight back, and unable to leave.

  37. Zero for Zelensky: (1)

    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed — McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.

    Earlier Tuesday, Zelensky met individually with Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA). Afterward, Johnson reiterated his position that the White House and Senate must get serious about securing the border before any additional aid to Ukraine can be considered, arguing that the Biden administration has failed to outline clear goals in further assisting Ukraine’s war against Russia.

    “We need a clear articulation of the strategy,” he said.

    Forever Wars can come back like Nosferatu, so I do not want to declare permanent victory. However, McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/12/zelensky-leaves-empty-handed-mcconnell-admits-ukraine-aid-talks-going-nowhere-punts-to-january/

    • Replies: @AP
    @A123

    It wasn't zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-announces-two-hundred-million-dollars-additional-military-aid-ukraine-zelenskyy-visit-white-house

    Replies: @Beckow, @A123

    , @Mikel
    @A123


    McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    Even more impressive is Lindsey Graham saying that he won't support the Ukraine aid package without a compromise on the border. This is the guy who used to tour Ukrainian military bases even before the war had started and harangue soldiers fighting the pro-Russians saying that "your fight is our fight".

    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes. His rebellion shook the party like nothing since Trump's appearance.

    I still think they will all cave in eventually and Ukraine will get a hefty package without anyone fixing anything of consequence on the border. But I wouldn't have predicted this a few months ago.

    Replies: @AP, @Mikhail

    , @Mr. Hack
    @A123


    However, McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    What national prestige and honor? From propping up Ukraine and being its largest supporter to doing an abrupt about face and letting it flounder to the financial might of the greatest gas station in the world? The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world. It will equally look like a cowardly nation not worth the ink that it signs in any future agreements, think Budapest Memorandum.

    2-3 months of closer deliberations in the congress should result in a clearer path of Ukrainian support. It aint over till the fat lady sings!

    Replies: @Derer, @Mikel

  38. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    The Baltic States acting as sock puppets in Europe against China is probably the most pathetic display of political stupidity and flunkeyism I have ever seen. It's not just smarter and more capable people would play off the Chinese against the Americans to extract concessions for their own benefit and vice versa.

    Want a China bad statement? We could use a new football stadium. What's really rather sad is the reality that their countries are facing eminent extinction within a single generation. Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, etc will cease to exist by mid century as the young and capable decamp for Germany/“The North East"(Costco is truly genius and very affordable annual membership is only $50, you quickly make that back in savings. I love those large frozen Alaskan salmon and cod packets) in droves and all that will be left is a retirement home masquerading as a country.

    Spending your remaining political time calling Russia names is bad enough, but spending it calling China, a country you have zero history or interaction with at the behest of your superiors, while your country disappears year by year in front of your very eyes due to the neoliberal economic and political system you seek to uphold is something else.

    Replies: @LatW, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    China, a country you have zero history or interaction

    Not true, Chinese and Latvians fought together for the Reds (not a flattering depiction here though)

    https://www.rbth.com/history/333135-how-chinese-soldiers-helped-bolsheviks

    Both Chinese and Japanese also supported the Whites and Czech Legion

    • Thanks: Mr. XYZ
    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Thanks! I've heard of that!

    BTW, off-topic, but I've got an alternate history question for you: In the absence of the Bolsheviks coming to power in Russia (either no Bolshevik coup at all in 1917 or the Whites winning the Russian Civil War), do you ever see Japan waging a war against either Russia or the United States, or even against both of them, perhaps even simultaneously (or not)?

    , @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I highly recommend the book Tennozan by George Fiefer, about the battle of Okinawa and the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan. Incredible stuff, it includes a funny story of a Kamikaze pilot who, after the sacramental saki and everything, took to the skies on his mission, but doubled back and strafed his celebratory comrades before actually heading out.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  39. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    By the way, does anybody in either Korea feel any qualms about supplying weapons? After all that is meant to kill two closely related groups of Slavs. This is macabre.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry. Later it was Stalin who gave Kim the go-ahead and T-34s to invade ROK
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seishin_Operation

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Seems like the smart thing for Tsar Nicholas II to do would have been to try partitioning Korea with Japan without a war--or, failing that, to let Japan have Korea in exchange for Russia having Manchuria and then having Russia outright annex Manchuria in order to secure all of the ethnic Chinese human capital there. If Sakhalin Koreans can successfully become Russians, why not Manchurian Chinese as well? They were largely illiterate back in 1900, after all--were they not? So, plenty of potential to instill a Russian (well, more accurately, a fusion Russo-Chinese) national consciousness inside of them.

    , @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry.
     
    That is quite horrible, a friend mine has a half-Korean friend whose family was apparently split up. :(

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea
     
    That is a really cool picture of the Black Octopus. Indeed, already so large, and yet still so full of avarice.

    Btw, if you're interested, I can share a bit about the Latvians who participated in the Russo-Japanese war (as part of the Tsar's army). I'm not too happy that they were there, killing Japanese, but at the time that's how the Empire was run.

    Here is a little write up from our history encyclopedia (you can see how this far off war shaped some of the later political events). It doesn't seem like a huge number of people but many of them were highly specialized:

    In the Russo-Japanese War, for the first time, Latvians participated en masse in modern warfare as military personnel involved in the service of the Russian Army and Navy - officers, soldiers and sailors, military officials, paramedics and pharmacists, as well as priests.

    The impact of the war extended beyond the military sphere and permeated Latvian society. The war's influence was evident in factors associated with the 1905 revolution. As early as 1904, the war's events began shaping the trajectory of Latvian urban industry (for example, a large order for railway wagons was received by the "Fenikss" factory in Riga, where around 2000 workers worked).

    The war significantly activated the social democratic groups established in the previous years in the industrial centers of Riga, Liepāja, Jelgava and Daugavpils, which started anti-war propaganda, there was some cooperation between Latvian, Polish, Lithuanian and Belarusian social democrats, for example, they issued a joint anti-war proclamation, while emphasizing the fact of national oppression.

    Latvian left-wing political groups, unlike the radical wing of the Polish Socialist Party, did not, however, get involved in supporting Russia's open enemy - Japan, although it was done by the prominent social democrat, editor of the newspaper "Struggle" Janis Jansons-Braun (in 07.01.1905, he reported from Liepāja to the General Staff of the Japanese Army about the activities of the Russian Navy).

    Recruitment

    In the Baltic governorates' territory, multiple mobilizations of military personnel in the army reserve occurred, involving troops in local garrisons. Within the regiments stationed in the European part of Russia, a selection of officers was made through a lottery system, and these chosen officers were then deployed to the front in the Far East. Latvians were among those selected, with a notable concentration of officers of Latvian origin in the troops stationed in the Baltic and surrounding provinces.

    Troop units, mobilized reservists, armaments, military equipment, and supplementary food supplies were transported from the European part of Russia to the war zone exclusively through the Trans-Siberian railway. The journey along this vital transport artery spanned 5 to 6 weeks.

    Description of the Latvian contingent and their military activity

    A total of at least 179 officers of Latvian nationality (most in infantry units), as well as about 60-80 enlisted officers (praporshchiks) mainly in infantry units and artillery, about 60-80 paramedics, pharmacists and military officials, as well as 2,500-3,000 soldiers and sailors participated in the hostilities.

    The companies were commanded by about 40-50 officers of Latvian nationality, there were also many younger officers, and most of them were awarded with combat orders.

    Some Latvians also served in the artillery units at the front, and took part in the battle at Mukden, served as task officers for communications with the Port Arthur fortress in the Manchurian Army's War Traffic Department. Some ran mobilization efforts.

    Captain astronomer Andrejs Auzans served in the topographers' unit in the 2nd Manchurian War. Several Latvians held positions in structures that cared for the wounded: Lieutenant Vilhelms Kaminskis was the manager of the hospital in Khabarovsk; lieutenant Jānis Miglavs – manager of the infirmary of the 54th division; captain Jānis Krastiņš – manager of the 63rd mobile field hospital and others. The former police chief of Kwantun and Port Arthur, lieutenant colonel Indriķis Lediņš, performed special tasks during the war as the commander of a special troops unit, performing tasks related to intelligence.

    Latvian sailors were engaged in combat right from the outset of the war. In the initial weeks, a minimum of six Latvians lost their lives, with three casualties occurring on the sunken cruiser "Varyag." Numerous Latvian sailors, totaling several hundred, served on the ships of the Pacific squadron either due to compulsory service or as part of their call-up for the Russo-Japanese War at the onset of the conflict.

    As in the ground forces, the Navy also had many soldiers and officers of Baltic-German origin.

    Latvian doctors, veterinary doctors, and pharmacists, whether conscripted, volunteers, or serving professionally in the army, participated in the war with Japan. This group included at least five professional army war doctors and approximately 40-50 doctors called up from the reserve. These medical professionals served in various capacities, including military units, infirmaries, hospitals, and Russian Red Cross medical institutions, where Latvian Sisters of Mercy were also present. Additionally, there were pharmacists contributing to the medical efforts at Port Arthur.

    The spiritual care of Latvian, German and Estonian Lutheran soldiers was carried out by Latvian pastors.

    About 200-250 Latvian soldiers and sailors died in the battles, including 12 officers. Many Baltic German officers died, too.

    There were many wounded and captured. Around 150-200 Latvian soldiers and sailors were captured, and were released at the end of 1905-1906. One of the soldiers saved the imperial monogram attached to the regimental flag during his captivity.

    The conflict with Japan marked the inaugural instance of substantial Latvian military participation in a 20th-century war. Latvians, including officers, military medics, pharmacists, and military officials, were actively involved. This engagement provided them with valuable exposure to modern combat, significantly influencing their career advancement. The experience gained in this conflict played a pivotal role in shaping the actions of Latvian soldiers during the subsequent First World War and the Latvian War of Independence.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I'd like to share this, too - a very beautiful South East Asian mandarin duck has appeared in Estonia, for some reason it has decided to spend the winter there. It really stands out.

    https://news.err.ee/1609192444/colorful-mandarin-duck-becomes-star-after-deciding-to-spend-winter-in-tartu

  40. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    China, a country you have zero history or interaction
     
    Not true, Chinese and Latvians fought together for the Reds (not a flattering depiction here though)

    https://i.postimg.cc/7YNg709Q/Sukuri-nshotto-1.png

    https://www.rbth.com/history/333135-how-chinese-soldiers-helped-bolsheviks

    Both Chinese and Japanese also supported the Whites and Czech Legion

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Kaartje_amerikanen_in_Rusland-1-.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Thanks! I’ve heard of that!

    BTW, off-topic, but I’ve got an alternate history question for you: In the absence of the Bolsheviks coming to power in Russia (either no Bolshevik coup at all in 1917 or the Whites winning the Russian Civil War), do you ever see Japan waging a war against either Russia or the United States, or even against both of them, perhaps even simultaneously (or not)?

  41. @songbird
    Political implications will be interesting, if Iran does send a man into space by 2029, as planned, even setting aside nuclear or other weapons potential.

    Imagine being beaten by Iran.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Mr. XYZ

    Imagine just how much more POWER Iran would have if it opened its doors wide open to Afghanistan’s, Iraq’s, and even Pakistan’s human capital!

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. XYZ

    Not really that hard to build a solid rocket.

    Persians and others were doing it 800 years ago, with gunpowder.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  42. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry. Later it was Stalin who gave Kim the go-ahead and T-34s to invade ROK

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Soviet_Amphibious_Landing_Chongjin_1945.png
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seishin_Operation

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Kisabur%C5%8D_Ohara%2C_Europe_and_Asia_Octopus_Map%2C_1904_Cornell_CUL_PJM_1145_01.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @LatW

    Seems like the smart thing for Tsar Nicholas II to do would have been to try partitioning Korea with Japan without a war–or, failing that, to let Japan have Korea in exchange for Russia having Manchuria and then having Russia outright annex Manchuria in order to secure all of the ethnic Chinese human capital there. If Sakhalin Koreans can successfully become Russians, why not Manchurian Chinese as well? They were largely illiterate back in 1900, after all–were they not? So, plenty of potential to instill a Russian (well, more accurately, a fusion Russo-Chinese) national consciousness inside of them.

  43. @YetAnotherAnon
    @anyone with a brain

    It took a much bigger tumble from 60k dollars two years ago, this time last year it was $16k. 40k now, so it would have been a nice Christmas present last year, and a bad one the year before.

    ETH has halved in dollar terms since Christmas 2021 as well.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @LondonBob

    I recently re-watched the Sam Bankman Fried presentation on Bankless. It was four days before Coindesk spilled the beans on the FTX books and six days before CZ did the demolition job. I couldn’t get much past the 30 minute mark but it is perhaps one of the ten all time internet hits so far. Aye aye aye aye aye aye aye.

    [MORE]

    He is going to be locked up for a long time but they haven’t done the sentence yet.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Scam Bankrun-Fraud openly gave huge sums to the Dems, and secretly gave a similar amount to the Republicans. He was also covertly holding down the market price of Bitcoin (and maybe was not the only one because quite possibly there is someone still doing it).

    You can't really deter someone like SBF who though it seems illogical had to be hugely important even in the scale of the disaster he'd cause. Stockton Rush the boss of the submarine that was destroyed on a trip to see the wreck of the Titanic was similar. They both absolutely knew how it would end.

    He didn't get offered a plea bargain so they were forcing him to go to trial and the only intention of that was to make plead not guilty all the better to make an example of him the original soft hearted judge dropped out because of a conflict of interest with her husbands firm doing work for SBF's company and she was replaced with the most dreaded judge in the system. I don't think SBF is necessarily going to be hammered but any great leniency is unlikely now Don't forget about Sam's parents being law professors and probably having an unrealistic faith in what legal representation can achieve, especially misplaced in SBF's context with his political donations embarrassing the government. The donations are what sank him because he was targeted. The speed of his trial proves it. He also cost Tom Brady (hired to do advertisments) a lot of money he invested in FTX.


    He hung himself out to dry in the stand, yet could have been the best most convincing witness ever and avoiding testifying to lies that could be exposed on cross examination by records but still would not have stood a chance with three of the four founders of the firm testifying that he did it. He did not take his pick of the law firms, a 76 year old close friend of the father and enormously wealthy investment fund owner, law professor, and in the 1980's superstar defense attorney did the rounds to get someone to represent SBF and was turned down repeatedly, so the lawyers Sam got were well down the list and likely the only name ones who would take the case rather than being currently at the top of their game. They were facing a huge prosecutorial team out to get him only, and swiftly going to trial. He ought to have insisted the defence team concentrated on his case much more, they were obviously used to having much more time to work on other things while also mastering the avalanche of irrelevant 'discovery' detail in SBF's case (common prosecutorial ploy flood the defence with complex documents).

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  44. Tucker Carlson on the Jimmy Dore Show! Talking Jon Stewart, Alex Jones, Israel, COVID & More!

  45. BTW, off-topic, but is it fair to say that the Crimean Corridor is Russia’s version of what the Polish Corridor was to Germany before 1945? Specifically, a non-ethnically Russian land connecting two ethnic Russian territories (Crimea and the core Russian heartland). Similar to how the Polish Corridor was Polish-majority but nevertheless connected ethnic German East Prussia and the core German heartland?

    Languages in Prussia according to Census Data from 1905 and 1910.
    byu/Pilum2211 inMapPorn

    The populations of Crimea and East Prussia are roughly comparable as well. Both in the two million range. A small drop in the bucket relative to the populations of the core German and Russian territories.

    I wonder if Russians view the Crimean Corridor similarly to how Germans viewed the Polish Corridor in the 1919-1945 time period. The Crimean Corridor is very useful insurance against the sabotage of the Crimean Bridge, after all.

    Interesting that both the German National State (under both Weimar Germany and Nazism) and the Russian National State (under Putin) have made it a mission to reacquire these territorial corridors.

    AP, does my analogy here seem spot on? And what do you think, Mr. Hack?

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. XYZ

    I don't know what the German public thought of the Polish corridor, I suspect many wanted to take it, but the Russian public never cared much for Kherson or Zaporizhia.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  46. The Great Bifurcation in action:

    The Russia-China-Iran Axis recognize the Taliban as Afghanistan’s legitimate government, with the West and their allies still recognizing Afghanistan’s former government as legitimate. India appears to be the odd one out here, also recognizing the Taliban. I wonder why that is. Maybe because Modi admires strength?

    Tajikistan supports the former Afghan government due to Tajik national solidarity (that crosses across national borders), I would presume? Afghanistan has a lot of Tajiks and their political position has likely significantly weakened in Afghanistan with the Taliban’s return to power there in 2021.

  47. @Mr. XYZ
    BTW, off-topic, but is it fair to say that the Crimean Corridor is Russia's version of what the Polish Corridor was to Germany before 1945? Specifically, a non-ethnically Russian land connecting two ethnic Russian territories (Crimea and the core Russian heartland). Similar to how the Polish Corridor was Polish-majority but nevertheless connected ethnic German East Prussia and the core German heartland?

    https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/comments/q6rg3q/languages_in_prussia_according_to_census_data/

    The populations of Crimea and East Prussia are roughly comparable as well. Both in the two million range. A small drop in the bucket relative to the populations of the core German and Russian territories.

    I wonder if Russians view the Crimean Corridor similarly to how Germans viewed the Polish Corridor in the 1919-1945 time period. The Crimean Corridor is very useful insurance against the sabotage of the Crimean Bridge, after all.

    Interesting that both the German National State (under both Weimar Germany and Nazism) and the Russian National State (under Putin) have made it a mission to reacquire these territorial corridors.

    AP, does my analogy here seem spot on? And what do you think, Mr. Hack?

    Replies: @AP

    I don’t know what the German public thought of the Polish corridor, I suspect many wanted to take it, but the Russian public never cared much for Kherson or Zaporizhia.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    AFAIK, a lot of Germans, even in Weimar times, were very upset over the Polish Corridor because it split Germany into two separate parts. I suspect that Prussians were by far the most upset of all because it was their own German state that was split into two parts. Bavarians, Saxons, et cetera had less of a stake in this. I think that what increased the level of offense was the fact that Germans could not easily travel by either road or rail between East Prussia and the German core territories:

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/80/mode/2up?q=rail

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/82/mode/2up?q=rail

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/n103/mode/2up?q=rail

    IIRC, Hitler wanted to solve this problem in a way that was also satisfactory to Poland by building an elevated extraterritorial German road/highway across the Polish Corridor (which would remain Polish) and, of course, returning overwhelmingly German Danzig to Germany. AFAIK, Poland either said no or simply refused to consider Hitler's offer, which along with various other things (refusing to join the Anti-Comintern Pact, allying with Britain, mistreating its Germans) caused Hitler to significantly sour on Poland.


    but the Russian public never cared much for Kherson or Zaporizhia.
     
    Just how much do Russians care about travelling to Crimea by land? Because the Crimean Corridor makes this considerably easier since the Crimean Bridge can always get targeted by Ukrainian missiles and/or blown up by Ukrainian bombs.

    Kherson itself (as in, the city of Kherson) is not a part of the Crimean Corridor and thus not vital (it's on the wrong side of the Dnieper River), but the parts of the Crimean Corridor that Russia currently controls do appear to be vital, at least for travelling to Crimea by land.

    Also, as you can see here, the city of Zaporizhia (unlike the southern part of Zaporizhia Oblast) is not vital for land communication between the core Russian territories and Crimea:

    https://www.worldometers.info/img/maps/ukraine_road_map.gif

  48. @A123
    Zero for Zelensky: (1)

    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed -- McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

     

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.
    ...
    Earlier Tuesday, Zelensky met individually with Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA). Afterward, Johnson reiterated his position that the White House and Senate must get serious about securing the border before any additional aid to Ukraine can be considered, arguing that the Biden administration has failed to outline clear goals in further assisting Ukraine’s war against Russia.

    “We need a clear articulation of the strategy,” he said.
     
    Forever Wars can come back like Nosferatu, so I do not want to declare permanent victory. However, McConnell's open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America's national prestige and honour.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/12/zelensky-leaves-empty-handed-mcconnell-admits-ukraine-aid-talks-going-nowhere-punts-to-january/

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel, @Mr. Hack

    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-announces-two-hundred-million-dollars-additional-military-aid-ukraine-zelenskyy-visit-white-house

    • Thanks: Mr. XYZ
    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP


    ...he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January
     
    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas. But the Ukie request was for $60 billion - $200 million is 0.3% of that amount.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions. The request for next year was 1/2 of that. To keep Ukraine afloat requires $100 billion annually from US-EU. That is an amount that dwarfs any previous aid to any country - e.g. total Argentinian IMF debt is $40 billion, plus another $40 billion to others - and they are about to go bankrupt in a peace time.

    Kiev can start printing hrivnas to keep paying the salaries-pensions and for the war. But that has historically led to hyper-inflation. Both militarily and economically Kiev is cornered.

    Have you started to organize the partisans yet? Zelko dresses like Che so it is appropriate that the war eventually goes the guerrilla route. I am pretty sure he won't stick around....What a f..ing waste, it will be studied for years for the cosmic level of stupidity. The lesson is never to listen to a fat elderly lady like Nuland,

    Replies: @AP

    , @A123
    @AP


    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.
     
    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 -- Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week. At best, Zelensky received 2 days of funding. At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.

    January is when the TALKS will restart. The next OPPORTUNITY for non-trivial funding is February or March. Is it possible that some money may wind up in a bill? Yes. However, it would be a tiny fraction of what Kiev aggression wants. The Veggie-in-Chief's team is focusing on U.S. elections, where Ukie extremism is a liability.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?

    Scholz is in the midst of an epic budget crisis. Macron had a catastrophic legislative failure and could face a no confidence vote. EU puppet masters are dangling their flailing Zelensky on visibly tangled strings.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP

  49. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ

    I don't know what the German public thought of the Polish corridor, I suspect many wanted to take it, but the Russian public never cared much for Kherson or Zaporizhia.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    AFAIK, a lot of Germans, even in Weimar times, were very upset over the Polish Corridor because it split Germany into two separate parts. I suspect that Prussians were by far the most upset of all because it was their own German state that was split into two parts. Bavarians, Saxons, et cetera had less of a stake in this. I think that what increased the level of offense was the fact that Germans could not easily travel by either road or rail between East Prussia and the German core territories:

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/80/mode/2up?q=rail

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/82/mode/2up?q=rail

    https://archive.org/details/polishcorridorco00donauoft/page/n103/mode/2up?q=rail

    IIRC, Hitler wanted to solve this problem in a way that was also satisfactory to Poland by building an elevated extraterritorial German road/highway across the Polish Corridor (which would remain Polish) and, of course, returning overwhelmingly German Danzig to Germany. AFAIK, Poland either said no or simply refused to consider Hitler’s offer, which along with various other things (refusing to join the Anti-Comintern Pact, allying with Britain, mistreating its Germans) caused Hitler to significantly sour on Poland.

    but the Russian public never cared much for Kherson or Zaporizhia.

    Just how much do Russians care about travelling to Crimea by land? Because the Crimean Corridor makes this considerably easier since the Crimean Bridge can always get targeted by Ukrainian missiles and/or blown up by Ukrainian bombs.

    Kherson itself (as in, the city of Kherson) is not a part of the Crimean Corridor and thus not vital (it’s on the wrong side of the Dnieper River), but the parts of the Crimean Corridor that Russia currently controls do appear to be vital, at least for travelling to Crimea by land.

    Also, as you can see here, the city of Zaporizhia (unlike the southern part of Zaporizhia Oblast) is not vital for land communication between the core Russian territories and Crimea:

  50. @AP
    @A123

    It wasn't zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-announces-two-hundred-million-dollars-additional-military-aid-ukraine-zelenskyy-visit-white-house

    Replies: @Beckow, @A123

    …he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January

    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas. But the Ukie request was for $60 billion – $200 million is 0.3% of that amount.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions. The request for next year was 1/2 of that. To keep Ukraine afloat requires $100 billion annually from US-EU. That is an amount that dwarfs any previous aid to any country – e.g. total Argentinian IMF debt is $40 billion, plus another $40 billion to others – and they are about to go bankrupt in a peace time.

    Kiev can start printing hrivnas to keep paying the salaries-pensions and for the war. But that has historically led to hyper-inflation. Both militarily and economically Kiev is cornered.

    Have you started to organize the partisans yet? Zelko dresses like Che so it is appropriate that the war eventually goes the guerrilla route. I am pretty sure he won’t stick around….What a f..ing waste, it will be studied for years for the cosmic level of stupidity. The lesson is never to listen to a fat elderly lady like Nuland,

    • Agree: Mikhail, A123
    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    …he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January

    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas
     
    He got $175 million a few weeks ago.

    There is $4.4 billion left that can still be given but has not been distributed yet.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions.
     
    Of course it has not spent $110 billion.

    A lot of that amount is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren't sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn't cash being sent.

    A lot of that amount is the cost of ammo being made at US factories. This is good for American workers in the heartland, and good for the US defense industry. It, too, isn't cash being sent to Ukraine.

    And here the total that Ukraine has gotten in equipment + cash has been $75 billion:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/12/us/politics/ukraine-us-military-aid.html#:~:text=Since%20Russia's%20February%202022%20invasion,and%20addressing%20its%20humanitarian%20needs.

    Since Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration has sent more than $75 billion in cash and equipment to the country for its defense. Most of the aid has gone to Ukraine’s military operations, keeping its government running and addressing its humanitarian needs.

    Looks like the cash amount has been $26.4 billion.

    A little bit more than 10 Las Vegas spheres.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H38U2q96OTg

    Or ten miles of New York subway:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-02-23/in-nyc-subway-a-case-study-in-runaway-transit-construction-costs

    Not much, all things considered, for wrecking much of Russia's military.

    What a f..ing waste, this will be studied for decades for the cosmic level stupidity.
     
    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Derer

  51. @Beckow
    @AP


    ...he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January
     
    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas. But the Ukie request was for $60 billion - $200 million is 0.3% of that amount.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions. The request for next year was 1/2 of that. To keep Ukraine afloat requires $100 billion annually from US-EU. That is an amount that dwarfs any previous aid to any country - e.g. total Argentinian IMF debt is $40 billion, plus another $40 billion to others - and they are about to go bankrupt in a peace time.

    Kiev can start printing hrivnas to keep paying the salaries-pensions and for the war. But that has historically led to hyper-inflation. Both militarily and economically Kiev is cornered.

    Have you started to organize the partisans yet? Zelko dresses like Che so it is appropriate that the war eventually goes the guerrilla route. I am pretty sure he won't stick around....What a f..ing waste, it will be studied for years for the cosmic level of stupidity. The lesson is never to listen to a fat elderly lady like Nuland,

    Replies: @AP

    …he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January

    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas

    He got $175 million a few weeks ago.

    There is $4.4 billion left that can still be given but has not been distributed yet.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions.

    Of course it has not spent $110 billion.

    A lot of that amount is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren’t sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    A lot of that amount is the cost of ammo being made at US factories. This is good for American workers in the heartland, and good for the US defense industry. It, too, isn’t cash being sent to Ukraine.

    And here the total that Ukraine has gotten in equipment + cash has been $75 billion:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/12/us/politics/ukraine-us-military-aid.html#:~:text=Since%20Russia’s%20February%202022%20invasion,and%20addressing%20its%20humanitarian%20needs.

    Since Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration has sent more than $75 billion in cash and equipment to the country for its defense. Most of the aid has gone to Ukraine’s military operations, keeping its government running and addressing its humanitarian needs.

    Looks like the cash amount has been $26.4 billion.

    A little bit more than 10 Las Vegas spheres.

    Or ten miles of New York subway:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-02-23/in-nyc-subway-a-case-study-in-runaway-transit-construction-costs

    Not much, all things considered, for wrecking much of Russia’s military.

    What a f..ing waste, this will be studied for decades for the cosmic level stupidity.

    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price. They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia (yes, it can be done) and treating all its people equally.

    Instead they chose to force a mono-Ukie-culture on all of Ukraine ("ban Russians!"), to join Nato and act as a forward base for Washington fanatics who constantly dream about dismantling or diminishing Russia. It had no chance of success - and now for the consequences.


    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.
     
    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU. That is a lot of cash...no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don't ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen? Try to be logical for once...

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia - he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia's wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia's leases in Crimea. What could have been...but it is too late.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    , @Derer
    @AP


    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.
     
    How could milking the Washington and Brussels simpleminded players at 33 trillion debt be stupid from Russian point of view. Actually this is the main reason for Putin policy to "go slow". Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.

    It appears that waiting for the removal of Kiev leadership from within and causing economic stress for the adversaries is paying off. Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.

    Replies: @AP

  52. @Mr. XYZ
    @songbird

    Imagine just how much more POWER Iran would have if it opened its doors wide open to Afghanistan's, Iraq's, and even Pakistan's human capital!

    Replies: @songbird

    Not really that hard to build a solid rocket.

    Persians and others were doing it 800 years ago, with gunpowder.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @songbird

    Sending a man into space is much, much harder, no?

    Replies: @songbird

  53. @A123
    Zero for Zelensky: (1)

    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed -- McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

     

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.
    ...
    Earlier Tuesday, Zelensky met individually with Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA). Afterward, Johnson reiterated his position that the White House and Senate must get serious about securing the border before any additional aid to Ukraine can be considered, arguing that the Biden administration has failed to outline clear goals in further assisting Ukraine’s war against Russia.

    “We need a clear articulation of the strategy,” he said.
     
    Forever Wars can come back like Nosferatu, so I do not want to declare permanent victory. However, McConnell's open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America's national prestige and honour.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/12/zelensky-leaves-empty-handed-mcconnell-admits-ukraine-aid-talks-going-nowhere-punts-to-january/

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel, @Mr. Hack

    McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.

    Even more impressive is Lindsey Graham saying that he won’t support the Ukraine aid package without a compromise on the border. This is the guy who used to tour Ukrainian military bases even before the war had started and harangue soldiers fighting the pro-Russians saying that “your fight is our fight”.

    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes. His rebellion shook the party like nothing since Trump’s appearance.

    I still think they will all cave in eventually and Ukraine will get a hefty package without anyone fixing anything of consequence on the border. But I wouldn’t have predicted this a few months ago.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mikel


    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes
     
    Of course he is.
    , @Mikhail
    @Mikel

    Among US senators, this guy is great:

    https://www.rt.com/news/588949-zelensky-visit-us-disgraceful/

  54. @AP
    @A123

    It wasn't zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-announces-two-hundred-million-dollars-additional-military-aid-ukraine-zelenskyy-visit-white-house

    Replies: @Beckow, @A123

    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 — Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week. At best, Zelensky received 2 days of funding. At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.

    January is when the TALKS will restart. The next OPPORTUNITY for non-trivial funding is February or March. Is it possible that some money may wind up in a bill? Yes. However, it would be a tiny fraction of what Kiev aggression wants. The Veggie-in-Chief’s team is focusing on U.S. elections, where Ukie extremism is a liability.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?

    Scholz is in the midst of an epic budget crisis. Macron had a catastrophic legislative failure and could face a no confidence vote. EU puppet masters are dangling their flailing Zelensky on visibly tangled strings.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @AP
    @A123


    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 —
     
    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?

    Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week.
     
    With some creative accounting.

    At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.
     
    That stuff is rather effective at killing Russian invaders though.

    January is when the TALKS will restart
     
    And in the meantime more will be taken from the remaining $4.4 billion set aside.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?
     
    Who knows? Hungary is holding up a $50 billion aid package. Hopefully it gets through eventually. They will simply have to bribe Orban.

    Replies: @A123

  55. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry. Later it was Stalin who gave Kim the go-ahead and T-34s to invade ROK

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Soviet_Amphibious_Landing_Chongjin_1945.png
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seishin_Operation

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Kisabur%C5%8D_Ohara%2C_Europe_and_Asia_Octopus_Map%2C_1904_Cornell_CUL_PJM_1145_01.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @LatW

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry.

    That is quite horrible, a friend mine has a half-Korean friend whose family was apparently split up. 🙁

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    That is a really cool picture of the Black Octopus. Indeed, already so large, and yet still so full of avarice.

    [MORE]

    Btw, if you’re interested, I can share a bit about the Latvians who participated in the Russo-Japanese war (as part of the Tsar’s army). I’m not too happy that they were there, killing Japanese, but at the time that’s how the Empire was run.

    Here is a little write up from our history encyclopedia (you can see how this far off war shaped some of the later political events). It doesn’t seem like a huge number of people but many of them were highly specialized:

    In the Russo-Japanese War, for the first time, Latvians participated en masse in modern warfare as military personnel involved in the service of the Russian Army and Navy – officers, soldiers and sailors, military officials, paramedics and pharmacists, as well as priests.

    The impact of the war extended beyond the military sphere and permeated Latvian society. The war’s influence was evident in factors associated with the 1905 revolution. As early as 1904, the war’s events began shaping the trajectory of Latvian urban industry (for example, a large order for railway wagons was received by the “Fenikss” factory in Riga, where around 2000 workers worked).

    The war significantly activated the social democratic groups established in the previous years in the industrial centers of Riga, Liepāja, Jelgava and Daugavpils, which started anti-war propaganda, there was some cooperation between Latvian, Polish, Lithuanian and Belarusian social democrats, for example, they issued a joint anti-war proclamation, while emphasizing the fact of national oppression.

    Latvian left-wing political groups, unlike the radical wing of the Polish Socialist Party, did not, however, get involved in supporting Russia’s open enemy – Japan, although it was done by the prominent social democrat, editor of the newspaper “Struggle” Janis Jansons-Braun (in 07.01.1905, he reported from Liepāja to the General Staff of the Japanese Army about the activities of the Russian Navy).

    Recruitment

    In the Baltic governorates’ territory, multiple mobilizations of military personnel in the army reserve occurred, involving troops in local garrisons. Within the regiments stationed in the European part of Russia, a selection of officers was made through a lottery system, and these chosen officers were then deployed to the front in the Far East. Latvians were among those selected, with a notable concentration of officers of Latvian origin in the troops stationed in the Baltic and surrounding provinces.

    Troop units, mobilized reservists, armaments, military equipment, and supplementary food supplies were transported from the European part of Russia to the war zone exclusively through the Trans-Siberian railway. The journey along this vital transport artery spanned 5 to 6 weeks.

    Description of the Latvian contingent and their military activity

    A total of at least 179 officers of Latvian nationality (most in infantry units), as well as about 60-80 enlisted officers (praporshchiks) mainly in infantry units and artillery, about 60-80 paramedics, pharmacists and military officials, as well as 2,500-3,000 soldiers and sailors participated in the hostilities.

    The companies were commanded by about 40-50 officers of Latvian nationality, there were also many younger officers, and most of them were awarded with combat orders.

    Some Latvians also served in the artillery units at the front, and took part in the battle at Mukden, served as task officers for communications with the Port Arthur fortress in the Manchurian Army’s War Traffic Department. Some ran mobilization efforts.

    Captain astronomer Andrejs Auzans served in the topographers’ unit in the 2nd Manchurian War. Several Latvians held positions in structures that cared for the wounded: Lieutenant Vilhelms Kaminskis was the manager of the hospital in Khabarovsk; lieutenant Jānis Miglavs – manager of the infirmary of the 54th division; captain Jānis Krastiņš – manager of the 63rd mobile field hospital and others. The former police chief of Kwantun and Port Arthur, lieutenant colonel Indriķis Lediņš, performed special tasks during the war as the commander of a special troops unit, performing tasks related to intelligence.

    Latvian sailors were engaged in combat right from the outset of the war. In the initial weeks, a minimum of six Latvians lost their lives, with three casualties occurring on the sunken cruiser “Varyag.” Numerous Latvian sailors, totaling several hundred, served on the ships of the Pacific squadron either due to compulsory service or as part of their call-up for the Russo-Japanese War at the onset of the conflict.

    As in the ground forces, the Navy also had many soldiers and officers of Baltic-German origin.

    Latvian doctors, veterinary doctors, and pharmacists, whether conscripted, volunteers, or serving professionally in the army, participated in the war with Japan. This group included at least five professional army war doctors and approximately 40-50 doctors called up from the reserve. These medical professionals served in various capacities, including military units, infirmaries, hospitals, and Russian Red Cross medical institutions, where Latvian Sisters of Mercy were also present. Additionally, there were pharmacists contributing to the medical efforts at Port Arthur.

    The spiritual care of Latvian, German and Estonian Lutheran soldiers was carried out by Latvian pastors.

    About 200-250 Latvian soldiers and sailors died in the battles, including 12 officers. Many Baltic German officers died, too.

    There were many wounded and captured. Around 150-200 Latvian soldiers and sailors were captured, and were released at the end of 1905-1906. One of the soldiers saved the imperial monogram attached to the regimental flag during his captivity.

    The conflict with Japan marked the inaugural instance of substantial Latvian military participation in a 20th-century war. Latvians, including officers, military medics, pharmacists, and military officials, were actively involved. This engagement provided them with valuable exposure to modern combat, significantly influencing their career advancement. The experience gained in this conflict played a pivotal role in shaping the actions of Latvian soldiers during the subsequent First World War and the Latvian War of Independence.

    • Thanks: Mr. XYZ
    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Thanks dear, a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia, just like a lot of EEs were pro-Japan. This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Paul_Georg_von_M%C3%B6llendorff_%281847-1901%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Georg_von_Möllendorff

    Here's a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries


    In 1903, the Latvian Social Democratic Union of Western Europe, in cooperation with the Latvian Social Democrats of the USA, founded the Latvian Social Democratic Union (LSS), the majority of whose members lived in London and Switzerland and were led by Miķelis Valters and Ernests Rolavs. At the beginning of the 1905 Revolution, the party had many members in Latvia and in May the LSS had about 1000 members. Already in the summer of 1905, some members of the party began to attack the estates. Members of the LSS organised the illegal transport of literature and weapons from Western Europe to the Russian Empire, which involved members of the London branch of the LSS Juris Šenbergs, Ernest Augusts Minka, Vilis Štrauss and Captain Janis Treimanis[1].

    During the Russo-Japanese War, in March 1905, the Japanese War Ministry allocated 1 million yen for the purchase and delivery of arms to support the Russian Revolution.[2] The Japanese military attaché in Stockholm, Colonel Motojiro Akashi, took the money to London and handed it over to the "United Fighting Organisation" (UBO), which had been formed by Russian émigrés. As an employee of the Japanese Embassy in St Petersburg, he had already established contacts with Russian oppositionists, including the Finnish politician Konrad (Konni) Zilliacus in 1902.

    A member of the group posing as the wine merchant Robert Richard Dickenson bought the English steamer John Grafton, built in 1883. According to the testimony of the later Soviet diplomat Litvinov, arms were bought for 100 000 roubles and a plan was drawn up to ship them to several Finnish ports. Latvians Minka, Wagner, Strauss and Salniņš took part in the procurement of the weapons.
     

    https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graftona_avantūra

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @LatW, @LatW

  56. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry. Later it was Stalin who gave Kim the go-ahead and T-34s to invade ROK

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Soviet_Amphibious_Landing_Chongjin_1945.png
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seishin_Operation

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Kisabur%C5%8D_Ohara%2C_Europe_and_Asia_Octopus_Map%2C_1904_Cornell_CUL_PJM_1145_01.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @LatW

    I’d like to share this, too – a very beautiful South East Asian mandarin duck has appeared in Estonia, for some reason it has decided to spend the winter there. It really stands out.

    https://news.err.ee/1609192444/colorful-mandarin-duck-becomes-star-after-deciding-to-spend-winter-in-tartu

  57. @AP
    @Beckow


    …he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January

    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas
     
    He got $175 million a few weeks ago.

    There is $4.4 billion left that can still be given but has not been distributed yet.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions.
     
    Of course it has not spent $110 billion.

    A lot of that amount is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren't sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn't cash being sent.

    A lot of that amount is the cost of ammo being made at US factories. This is good for American workers in the heartland, and good for the US defense industry. It, too, isn't cash being sent to Ukraine.

    And here the total that Ukraine has gotten in equipment + cash has been $75 billion:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/12/us/politics/ukraine-us-military-aid.html#:~:text=Since%20Russia's%20February%202022%20invasion,and%20addressing%20its%20humanitarian%20needs.

    Since Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration has sent more than $75 billion in cash and equipment to the country for its defense. Most of the aid has gone to Ukraine’s military operations, keeping its government running and addressing its humanitarian needs.

    Looks like the cash amount has been $26.4 billion.

    A little bit more than 10 Las Vegas spheres.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H38U2q96OTg

    Or ten miles of New York subway:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-02-23/in-nyc-subway-a-case-study-in-runaway-transit-construction-costs

    Not much, all things considered, for wrecking much of Russia's military.

    What a f..ing waste, this will be studied for decades for the cosmic level stupidity.
     
    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Derer

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price. They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia (yes, it can be done) and treating all its people equally.

    Instead they chose to force a mono-Ukie-culture on all of Ukraine (“ban Russians!”), to join Nato and act as a forward base for Washington fanatics who constantly dream about dismantling or diminishing Russia. It had no chance of success – and now for the consequences.

    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU. That is a lot of cash…no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don’t ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen? Try to be logical for once…

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia – he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia’s wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia’s leases in Crimea. What could have been…but it is too late.

    • Agree: Mikhail, Wielgus
    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Beckow

    $200 million is Zelensky's severance payment! He will say some strange and creepy things in the build up to the New Year and Orthodox Christmas and then will be gone.

    Don't forget he is a professional actor (liar). There are no residuals on this gig so he has to get everything up front.

    He seems to have a lot of chutzpah so here is an alternative idea. Maybe he was offering his services to the Demonrats as a Biden replacement candidate. So what if he wasn't born here, votes don't count anyway...

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @Beckow


    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia – he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia’s wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia’s leases in Crimea. What could have been…but it is too late.
     
    Yanuk never securing a parliamentary majority fairly might have had something to do with why he was removed. But Yeah, look at Yanuk, he tried playing off both the EU and Russia against each other until he simply couldn't do it any longer, after which point his hold on power became untenable.

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @AP
    @Beckow


    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price.
     
    Russia has lost about 100k+ dead and counting, lots of military equipment, and an economy that is a lot worse than would have been otherwise.

    They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia
     
    When Ukraine pursued a neutral policy it was the second poorest country in Europe only Moldova, another country pursuing a neutral policy - was poorer.

    Ukraine was finally catching up after 2016, so Russia invaded.

    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU.
     
    The snippet you cut out referred specifically to the value of the equipment Ukraine was getting.

    This was the full paragraph that snippet came from:

    "A lot of that amount [aid] is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren’t sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent."

    no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don’t ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen?
     
    Do you have significant evidence of cash being stolen and/or removed in airplanes?

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.
     
    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    Replies: @Beckow, @Mr. XYZ

  58. Everyone in government, healthcare, mental healthcare, big pharma, the media, academia, the scientific community, the surveillance state, the military, the financial sector, and the technology sector have all developed dissociative disorder and alter egos. How long is this sick evil, sadistic charade going to continue for? I am mad as hell about it! Who in the hell do they think they are?! They expect us to value their lives and families more than we value our own lives and families. Not only do they demand to get away with it, they demand to be treated with respect when they have acted in the most unrespectable possible way by perpetrating crimes against humanity, treason, terrorism, medical fraud, pre-meditated mal practice, organized crime, financial fraud, and mass murder and mass theft! No. I refuse to forgive them for their Ted Bundy Manson Family lifestyles! They are not worth sacrificing anything for, not worth suffering for, and are unworthy of being forgiven! It will only encourage them! They are using their families as human shields for their evil, illegal predatory lifestyles! They are using Marxist subversive tactics of terrorism, sabotage, and mass murder in their cowardly undeclared war on us. They are evil, narcissistic spoiled rotten brats that must be held legally accountable for their monstrouus crimes and reckless and careless disregard! Apparently it is their plan to keep terrorizing us. If we consent to it, they will just keep doing it. They believe that they are above the law, above criticism, and above accountability!

  59. @Beckow
    @AP

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price. They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia (yes, it can be done) and treating all its people equally.

    Instead they chose to force a mono-Ukie-culture on all of Ukraine ("ban Russians!"), to join Nato and act as a forward base for Washington fanatics who constantly dream about dismantling or diminishing Russia. It had no chance of success - and now for the consequences.


    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.
     
    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU. That is a lot of cash...no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don't ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen? Try to be logical for once...

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia - he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia's wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia's leases in Crimea. What could have been...but it is too late.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    $200 million is Zelensky’s severance payment! He will say some strange and creepy things in the build up to the New Year and Orthodox Christmas and then will be gone.

    Don’t forget he is a professional actor (liar). There are no residuals on this gig so he has to get everything up front.

    He seems to have a lot of chutzpah so here is an alternative idea. Maybe he was offering his services to the Demonrats as a Biden replacement candidate. So what if he wasn’t born here, votes don’t count anyway…

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @QCIC

    My sense is the visit to Washington was improvised, they are now making it up day-by-day. Nato knows that Ukies can't hold militarily in the long run but they lack the B team to negotiate a face-saving climb down. (Where is the fat German Frau when you need her?)

    Everyone is positioning for the coming blame game: not enough weapons, bad execution of the offensive, Israel-Gaza, US internal politics - the ghost of Trump, Euros lacking martial spirit and fickleness... Zelko wanted to see the capo di tutti capi in person: he knows there is the Western public posture and there is the reality - but what's the timing...and are they really sending him to Argentina?

    The problem is that Zelko and his entourage anywhere in the West after the war could be embarrassing: interviews, recriminations, where did all the money go...but Argentina looks so post-WW2 Nazi like...it is a mess...

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikhail

  60. @Beckow
    @AP

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price. They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia (yes, it can be done) and treating all its people equally.

    Instead they chose to force a mono-Ukie-culture on all of Ukraine ("ban Russians!"), to join Nato and act as a forward base for Washington fanatics who constantly dream about dismantling or diminishing Russia. It had no chance of success - and now for the consequences.


    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.
     
    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU. That is a lot of cash...no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don't ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen? Try to be logical for once...

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia - he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia's wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia's leases in Crimea. What could have been...but it is too late.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia – he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia’s wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia’s leases in Crimea. What could have been…but it is too late.

    Yanuk never securing a parliamentary majority fairly might have had something to do with why he was removed. But Yeah, look at Yanuk, he tried playing off both the EU and Russia against each other until he simply couldn’t do it any longer, after which point his hold on power became untenable.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mr. XYZ

    Nothing in politics is done fairly...so that is a complete non-sequitur.


    ...he tried playing off both the EU and Russia against each other until he simply couldn’t do it any longer
     
    There is some truth to that - it got to the point that EU had to talk to Russia and they refused. If EU had actual brains (and independence) a three-way deal could had been negotiated and we would have avoided all the painful nonsense. But it looks like Brussels wanted a crisis, they wanted to put Kiev in a no-win dilemma and force them to cut all trade links to Russia.

    Brussels (=Nato) hoped to bluff Russia. If Russia had stayed quiet it would have worked. Or alternatively Brussels wanted a war between Ukraine and Russia. Now they have the war and are losing it. As always EU has no idea what to do - the combination of complete subservience to Washington and the mid-wit stupidity can be fatal. They are only a few steps behind Ukraine. (But they got great truffles and damn reality...)

  61. @songbird
    @Mr. XYZ

    Not really that hard to build a solid rocket.

    Persians and others were doing it 800 years ago, with gunpowder.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    Sending a man into space is much, much harder, no?

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. XYZ

    The hull of a rocket is not unlike that of a grain silo or submarine. A solid fuel rocket has very few moving parts, maybe the gimbal. If one doesn't attempt a spacewalk, no need for any really sophisticated engineering.

    I would say that it was more difficult to build the Kowsar.

    I think the reason that more countries haven't sent men into space is a mix of political and economic. But not much to do with the technical. On the low end - just getting a man into space in cramped quarters - it seems like a fairly low hurdle to clear, for any industrial country with some scale, IMO.

  62. @Mr. XYZ
    @Beckow


    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia – he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia’s wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia’s leases in Crimea. What could have been…but it is too late.
     
    Yanuk never securing a parliamentary majority fairly might have had something to do with why he was removed. But Yeah, look at Yanuk, he tried playing off both the EU and Russia against each other until he simply couldn't do it any longer, after which point his hold on power became untenable.

    Replies: @Beckow

    Nothing in politics is done fairly...so that is a complete non-sequitur.

    …he tried playing off both the EU and Russia against each other until he simply couldn’t do it any longer

    There is some truth to that – it got to the point that EU had to talk to Russia and they refused. If EU had actual brains (and independence) a three-way deal could had been negotiated and we would have avoided all the painful nonsense. But it looks like Brussels wanted a crisis, they wanted to put Kiev in a no-win dilemma and force them to cut all trade links to Russia.

    Brussels (=Nato) hoped to bluff Russia. If Russia had stayed quiet it would have worked. Or alternatively Brussels wanted a war between Ukraine and Russia. Now they have the war and are losing it. As always EU has no idea what to do – the combination of complete subservience to Washington and the mid-wit stupidity can be fatal. They are only a few steps behind Ukraine. (But they got great truffles and damn reality…)

  63. @A123
    Zero for Zelensky: (1)

    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed -- McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

     

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.
    ...
    Earlier Tuesday, Zelensky met individually with Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA). Afterward, Johnson reiterated his position that the White House and Senate must get serious about securing the border before any additional aid to Ukraine can be considered, arguing that the Biden administration has failed to outline clear goals in further assisting Ukraine’s war against Russia.

    “We need a clear articulation of the strategy,” he said.
     
    Forever Wars can come back like Nosferatu, so I do not want to declare permanent victory. However, McConnell's open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America's national prestige and honour.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/12/12/zelensky-leaves-empty-handed-mcconnell-admits-ukraine-aid-talks-going-nowhere-punts-to-january/

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel, @Mr. Hack

    However, McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.

    What national prestige and honor? From propping up Ukraine and being its largest supporter to doing an abrupt about face and letting it flounder to the financial might of the greatest gas station in the world? The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world. It will equally look like a cowardly nation not worth the ink that it signs in any future agreements, think Budapest Memorandum.

    2-3 months of closer deliberations in the congress should result in a clearer path of Ukrainian support. It aint over till the fat lady sings!

    • Replies: @Derer
    @Mr. Hack


    leader (USA) of the free world,
     
    What free world? The one, where the US military bases are present? Those are not sovereign or free countries.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Mikel
    @Mr. Hack


    The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world.
     
    All things considered, I consider the US to be the greatest country in the world but other than Israel and perhaps South Korea, I don't know who else may consider it today to be a very reliable ally.

    If your independence depends on the US continuing to support you indefinitely, you can't really say that you are an independent country. Apart from the possibility of American internal politics leading to the US doing a Kabul or a Saigon on you, your own internal politics are going to be scrutinized so that you comply with US norms that may not be part of your culture at all. I would certainly hate my country to be a Russian puppet. Just look at repressive and impoverished Belarus. But I don't think the Russians care about shoving any particular ideology down anybody's throat these days as much as the American Establishment does. Being such a great country inevitably led the US to become a superpower but sadly, that meant abandoning the non-interventionist spirit of earlier times.

    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US. Regardless of my thoughts about the tragedy that started in 2014, the Ukrainian military has shown a great deal of competence while the Russians have proven to be weaker and less competent than anybody thought. However, at the end of the day Russia continues to be a huge country with vast human and material resources and capable of fielding many advanced lethal weapons. Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war. Starting by not killing so many of their civilian co-ethnics, as I'll never tire to repeat.

    Replies: @LatW, @Beckow

  64. @Mr. XYZ
    @songbird

    Sending a man into space is much, much harder, no?

    Replies: @songbird

    The hull of a rocket is not unlike that of a grain silo or submarine. A solid fuel rocket has very few moving parts, maybe the gimbal. If one doesn’t attempt a spacewalk, no need for any really sophisticated engineering.

    [MORE]

    I would say that it was more difficult to build the Kowsar.

    I think the reason that more countries haven’t sent men into space is a mix of political and economic. But not much to do with the technical. On the low end – just getting a man into space in cramped quarters – it seems like a fairly low hurdle to clear, for any industrial country with some scale, IMO.

  65. @Beckow
    @AP

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price. They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia (yes, it can be done) and treating all its people equally.

    Instead they chose to force a mono-Ukie-culture on all of Ukraine ("ban Russians!"), to join Nato and act as a forward base for Washington fanatics who constantly dream about dismantling or diminishing Russia. It had no chance of success - and now for the consequences.


    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.
     
    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU. That is a lot of cash...no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don't ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen? Try to be logical for once...

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each. He was pro-Ukrainian and not pro-EU or pro-Russia - he spent 3 years negotiating with EU against Russia's wishes! He probably stole less than the people who came after him. Yanuk was removed because he was anti-Nato and extended Russia's leases in Crimea. What could have been...but it is too late.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price.

    Russia has lost about 100k+ dead and counting, lots of military equipment, and an economy that is a lot worse than would have been otherwise.

    They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia

    When Ukraine pursued a neutral policy it was the second poorest country in Europe only Moldova, another country pursuing a neutral policy – was poorer.

    Ukraine was finally catching up after 2016, so Russia invaded.

    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU.

    The snippet you cut out referred specifically to the value of the equipment Ukraine was getting.

    This was the full paragraph that snippet came from:

    “A lot of that amount [aid] is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren’t sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.”

    no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don’t ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen?

    Do you have significant evidence of cash being stolen and/or removed in airplanes?

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP


    ...In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).
     

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash - how much was stolen? Was it significant to you? Your tales about "over-valued" weapons change nothing; it is true, but it came out of a different aid bucket. $40 billion was in cash assistance - money sent over to "assist"...

    If you believe that Russia lost "100k" soldiers, how many did Kiev lose? Or is it 10k as you once claimed? Well, then the Ukies must be real supermen...but that doesn't explain how they ruined their country after 1991 and then lost the war they didn't have to fight. Something here doesn't add up...

    Replies: @QCIC, @AP

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @AP


    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

     

    Those Ukrainians who wanted to move towards Russia would have been better off not voting for Ukrainian independence back in 1991. Much less suffering that way. The raison d'etre of Ukrainian independence was to eventually join the European Union, which ultimately is much more impressive than the Soviet Union was anyway (many more people of higher average quality).
  66. @A123
    @AP


    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.
     
    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 -- Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week. At best, Zelensky received 2 days of funding. At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.

    January is when the TALKS will restart. The next OPPORTUNITY for non-trivial funding is February or March. Is it possible that some money may wind up in a bill? Yes. However, it would be a tiny fraction of what Kiev aggression wants. The Veggie-in-Chief's team is focusing on U.S. elections, where Ukie extremism is a liability.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?

    Scholz is in the midst of an epic budget crisis. Macron had a catastrophic legislative failure and could face a no confidence vote. EU puppet masters are dangling their flailing Zelensky on visibly tangled strings.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP

    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 —

    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?

    Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week.

    With some creative accounting.

    At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.

    That stuff is rather effective at killing Russian invaders though.

    January is when the TALKS will restart

    And in the meantime more will be taken from the remaining $4.4 billion set aside.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?

    Who knows? Hungary is holding up a $50 billion aid package. Hopefully it gets through eventually. They will simply have to bribe Orban.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @A123
    @AP



    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed — McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

     

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.
     

    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?
     

    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations. This meaning was obvious to those familiar with U.S. government. I referenced SENATOR McConnell by name, and his capitulation in the CONGRESSIONAL appropriations process.

    I repeated the quote for you again, with the obvious points in bold so you do not miss painfully obvious facts about the objectively true & obvious facts again.

    Stating that the executive branch released a dribble from a previous appropriation badly misses the actual and incredibly obvious factual point I made about CONGRESS and new funding.

    Is zero in NEW congressional appropriation $200M?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP

  67. @Mikel
    @A123


    McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    Even more impressive is Lindsey Graham saying that he won't support the Ukraine aid package without a compromise on the border. This is the guy who used to tour Ukrainian military bases even before the war had started and harangue soldiers fighting the pro-Russians saying that "your fight is our fight".

    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes. His rebellion shook the party like nothing since Trump's appearance.

    I still think they will all cave in eventually and Ukraine will get a hefty package without anyone fixing anything of consequence on the border. But I wouldn't have predicted this a few months ago.

    Replies: @AP, @Mikhail

    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes

    Of course he is.

  68. @Mikel
    @A123


    McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    Even more impressive is Lindsey Graham saying that he won't support the Ukraine aid package without a compromise on the border. This is the guy who used to tour Ukrainian military bases even before the war had started and harangue soldiers fighting the pro-Russians saying that "your fight is our fight".

    I may not buy a used car from him but Gaetz is now one of my political heroes. His rebellion shook the party like nothing since Trump's appearance.

    I still think they will all cave in eventually and Ukraine will get a hefty package without anyone fixing anything of consequence on the border. But I wouldn't have predicted this a few months ago.

    Replies: @AP, @Mikhail

  69. @Mr. Hack
    @A123


    However, McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    What national prestige and honor? From propping up Ukraine and being its largest supporter to doing an abrupt about face and letting it flounder to the financial might of the greatest gas station in the world? The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world. It will equally look like a cowardly nation not worth the ink that it signs in any future agreements, think Budapest Memorandum.

    2-3 months of closer deliberations in the congress should result in a clearer path of Ukrainian support. It aint over till the fat lady sings!

    Replies: @Derer, @Mikel

    leader (USA) of the free world,

    What free world? The one, where the US military bases are present? Those are not sovereign or free countries.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Derer

    And everyone of them would cry bloody murder if the US closed down any base and left. All bases are the source of business opportunities and jobs for the locals. Name even one of these host countries that wants the US to go?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Derer

  70. @QCIC
    @Beckow

    $200 million is Zelensky's severance payment! He will say some strange and creepy things in the build up to the New Year and Orthodox Christmas and then will be gone.

    Don't forget he is a professional actor (liar). There are no residuals on this gig so he has to get everything up front.

    He seems to have a lot of chutzpah so here is an alternative idea. Maybe he was offering his services to the Demonrats as a Biden replacement candidate. So what if he wasn't born here, votes don't count anyway...

    Replies: @Beckow

    My sense is the visit to Washington was improvised, they are now making it up day-by-day. Nato knows that Ukies can’t hold militarily in the long run but they lack the B team to negotiate a face-saving climb down. (Where is the fat German Frau when you need her?)

    Everyone is positioning for the coming blame game: not enough weapons, bad execution of the offensive, Israel-Gaza, US internal politics – the ghost of Trump, Euros lacking martial spirit and fickleness… Zelko wanted to see the capo di tutti capi in person: he knows there is the Western public posture and there is the reality – but what’s the timing…and are they really sending him to Argentina?

    The problem is that Zelko and his entourage anywhere in the West after the war could be embarrassing: interviews, recriminations, where did all the money go…but Argentina looks so post-WW2 Nazi like…it is a mess…

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Beckow

    Not really, Argentina looks more like present day Ukraine or 90s Russia, very much oligarch dominated. Hopefully Millei will do some good, can't do any worse. Argentina has a lot of mineral wealth, they should exploit that and generate some wealth, as the more successful Latin American countries do.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    , @Mikhail
    @Beckow

    https://www.rt.com/russia/588976-zelensky-no-village-lost/

  71. @AP
    @Beckow


    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price.
     
    Russia has lost about 100k+ dead and counting, lots of military equipment, and an economy that is a lot worse than would have been otherwise.

    They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia
     
    When Ukraine pursued a neutral policy it was the second poorest country in Europe only Moldova, another country pursuing a neutral policy - was poorer.

    Ukraine was finally catching up after 2016, so Russia invaded.

    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU.
     
    The snippet you cut out referred specifically to the value of the equipment Ukraine was getting.

    This was the full paragraph that snippet came from:

    "A lot of that amount [aid] is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren’t sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent."

    no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don’t ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen?
     
    Do you have significant evidence of cash being stolen and/or removed in airplanes?

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.
     
    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    Replies: @Beckow, @Mr. XYZ

    …In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you? Your tales about “over-valued” weapons change nothing; it is true, but it came out of a different aid bucket. $40 billion was in cash assistance – money sent over to “assist”…

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how many did Kiev lose? Or is it 10k as you once claimed? Well, then the Ukies must be real supermen…but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991 and then lost the war they didn’t have to fight. Something here doesn’t add up…

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Beckow

    The Slavs have tragically lost a lot of good men.

    It may be too early to determine how the sanctions have changed Russia's economy. The widespread import substitution could be the kick the economy needed. Also the SMO politics may have loosened the grip of some Russian oligarchs. On the other hand, these things may push Russia back to more of a centrally planned economy. In the short run (now to three years) they seem better off.

    , @AP
    @Beckow


    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.
     
    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you
     
    I asked you for evidence that a significant portion of the $40 billion in cash assistance was stolen.

    You provided none.

    You want a number? Well, 1% would be significant. Any evidence of $400 million having been stolen? Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft, surely it would be easy to find evidence of that.

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how
     
    How many do you think Russia has lost since the invasion started in February 2022?

    Or is it 10k as you once claimed?

     

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war (unless I mentioned such a number in early 2022, don’t recall).

    but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991
     
    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @Beckow

  72. @YetAnotherAnon
    @anyone with a brain

    It took a much bigger tumble from 60k dollars two years ago, this time last year it was $16k. 40k now, so it would have been a nice Christmas present last year, and a bad one the year before.

    ETH has halved in dollar terms since Christmas 2021 as well.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @LondonBob

    A lot of the alt coins are worthless now, as they all are ultimately. Also have to remember that a lot of people have had their ‘coins’ stolen too.

    Interesting question is who invented bitcoin, I would guess either the intelligence agencies, I think the hash things was patented by the NSA, or Paul Le Roux. Bitcoin has a purpose as such, Nikolai Mushegian was right, so I guess it will hang around.

  73. @Beckow
    @QCIC

    My sense is the visit to Washington was improvised, they are now making it up day-by-day. Nato knows that Ukies can't hold militarily in the long run but they lack the B team to negotiate a face-saving climb down. (Where is the fat German Frau when you need her?)

    Everyone is positioning for the coming blame game: not enough weapons, bad execution of the offensive, Israel-Gaza, US internal politics - the ghost of Trump, Euros lacking martial spirit and fickleness... Zelko wanted to see the capo di tutti capi in person: he knows there is the Western public posture and there is the reality - but what's the timing...and are they really sending him to Argentina?

    The problem is that Zelko and his entourage anywhere in the West after the war could be embarrassing: interviews, recriminations, where did all the money go...but Argentina looks so post-WW2 Nazi like...it is a mess...

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikhail

    Not really, Argentina looks more like present day Ukraine or 90s Russia, very much oligarch dominated. Hopefully Millei will do some good, can’t do any worse. Argentina has a lot of mineral wealth, they should exploit that and generate some wealth, as the more successful Latin American countries do.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @LondonBob


    Hopefully Millei will do some good, can’t do any worse.
     
    Russian joke:
    The pessimist says:
    - Everything is so bad, it cannot get any worse.
    The optimist replies:
    - But surely it can!

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  74. Couple of hundred dead and several thousand wounded, a high proportion of which are seriously, Israel paying a heavy price for their attempted genocide.

  75. @Derer
    @Mr. Hack


    leader (USA) of the free world,
     
    What free world? The one, where the US military bases are present? Those are not sovereign or free countries.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    And everyone of them would cry bloody murder if the US closed down any base and left. All bases are the source of business opportunities and jobs for the locals. Name even one of these host countries that wants the US to go?

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    Iraq. Syria.

    The Anpo protests in Japan were pretty massive.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anpo_protests

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    The French gave them the boot and the Germans, Dutch, Norwegians, British, Italians, and Spaniards would give them the boot after 30 seconds of deliberation if the people had anything to say about it.

    Are you drunk?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Derer
    @Mr. Hack

    Most important is Germany or Japan. Those 50k American soldiers in Germany are not there to protect Germany but to put out any sign of anti-Americanism. Russians left East Germany and unified the nation, while London and Paris objected. Where is the prove of your suggested pathetic hypocrisy?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  76. @Mr. Hack
    @Derer

    And everyone of them would cry bloody murder if the US closed down any base and left. All bases are the source of business opportunities and jobs for the locals. Name even one of these host countries that wants the US to go?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Derer

    Iraq. Syria.

    The Anpo protests in Japan were pretty massive.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    Let me help you out, there were some protests in Japan just a few years back. A couple of soldiers got drunk and "raped" a woman during their night out on the town, Although a despicable act, so what? A couple of protests over the last 75 years in over 600 bases, all related to drunk and misbehaving servicemen? Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

    Replies: @songbird

  77. @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    Iraq. Syria.

    The Anpo protests in Japan were pretty massive.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anpo_protests

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Let me help you out, there were some protests in Japan just a few years back. A couple of soldiers got drunk and “raped” a woman during their night out on the town, Although a despicable act, so what? A couple of protests over the last 75 years in over 600 bases, all related to drunk and misbehaving servicemen? Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. Hack


    A couple of soldiers got drunk and “raped” a woman during their night out on the town
     
    LMAO. Why are you putting it in quotation marks? IIRC there's been a couple of incidents, including these two with corpuses delicti:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-42192571


    But you're being overly reductive. There are many reasons not to want US troops around beyond these incidents (including if you are American), and I don't think it's the main motivation for many.

    Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.
     
    surely, a straw man. Many EEs probably want more US bases. Likely as do some of these these very small states, like Qatar or Djibouti.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  78. @AP
    @A123


    It wasn’t zero, he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January in terms of US aid.

    😆 ROTFLMAO 😁 —
     
    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?

    Kiev aggression burns over €1 Billion/week.
     
    With some creative accounting.

    At worst, it is aging shelf stock that has no use other than resale on the black market.
     
    That stuff is rather effective at killing Russian invaders though.

    January is when the TALKS will restart
     
    And in the meantime more will be taken from the remaining $4.4 billion set aside.

    Please answer this question directly:

    Will Germany & France pony up an ADDITIONAL €3-5 Billion/month?
     
    Who knows? Hungary is holding up a $50 billion aid package. Hopefully it gets through eventually. They will simply have to bribe Orban.

    Replies: @A123

    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed — McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.

    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?

    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations. This meaning was obvious to those familiar with U.S. government. I referenced SENATOR McConnell by name, and his capitulation in the CONGRESSIONAL appropriations process.

    I repeated the quote for you again, with the obvious points in bold so you do not miss painfully obvious facts about the objectively true & obvious facts again.

    Stating that the executive branch released a dribble from a previous appropriation badly misses the actual and incredibly obvious factual point I made about CONGRESS and new funding.

    Is zero in NEW congressional appropriation $200M?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @AP
    @A123


    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations
     
    Your words were “Zero for Zelensky.”

    If you had stated what you state now, you would have been correct.

    But you did not state that Zelensky received zero in new appropriations.

    The excerpt from Foxnews contradicted your statement; the footnote did not match the claim.

    Good that you have revised and clarified your statement to reflect what had actually occurred.

    Zelensky did not get a deal for 2023 for anything, but did receive a $200 million tranche from the $4.6 billion (now $4.4 billion) still remaining.

    Replies: @A123

  79. @Beckow
    @AP


    ...In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).
     

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash - how much was stolen? Was it significant to you? Your tales about "over-valued" weapons change nothing; it is true, but it came out of a different aid bucket. $40 billion was in cash assistance - money sent over to "assist"...

    If you believe that Russia lost "100k" soldiers, how many did Kiev lose? Or is it 10k as you once claimed? Well, then the Ukies must be real supermen...but that doesn't explain how they ruined their country after 1991 and then lost the war they didn't have to fight. Something here doesn't add up...

    Replies: @QCIC, @AP

    The Slavs have tragically lost a lot of good men.

    It may be too early to determine how the sanctions have changed Russia’s economy. The widespread import substitution could be the kick the economy needed. Also the SMO politics may have loosened the grip of some Russian oligarchs. On the other hand, these things may push Russia back to more of a centrally planned economy. In the short run (now to three years) they seem better off.

  80. @Beckow
    @AP


    ...In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).
     

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash - how much was stolen? Was it significant to you? Your tales about "over-valued" weapons change nothing; it is true, but it came out of a different aid bucket. $40 billion was in cash assistance - money sent over to "assist"...

    If you believe that Russia lost "100k" soldiers, how many did Kiev lose? Or is it 10k as you once claimed? Well, then the Ukies must be real supermen...but that doesn't explain how they ruined their country after 1991 and then lost the war they didn't have to fight. Something here doesn't add up...

    Replies: @QCIC, @AP

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.

    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you

    I asked you for evidence that a significant portion of the $40 billion in cash assistance was stolen.

    You provided none.

    You want a number? Well, 1% would be significant. Any evidence of $400 million having been stolen? Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft, surely it would be easy to find evidence of that.

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how

    How many do you think Russia has lost since the invasion started in February 2022?

    Or is it 10k as you once claimed?

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war (unless I mentioned such a number in early 2022, don’t recall).

    but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP


    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

     

    Was Kravchuk not a Sovok as well?

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

     

    To be fair, virtually all of Ukraine outside of the far west voted for Kravchuk in 1991. They should have voted for Chornovil if they wanted the post-Communist transition to be led by someone who wasn't a Sovok.

    I think that this is the central issue here: That a lot of Ukrainians wanted independence in 1991 in the hope of a much better quality of life for themselves but were still determined to vote for Sovoks for a while. Central Ukraine stopped voting for Sovoks first (early 2000s), of course.
    , @LatW
    @AP


    The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.
     
    "Russia never forgives friendship with her," says Ayder Muzhdabayev (a Crimean (Krimchak) critic of the Kremlin).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @AnonfromTN

    , @Beckow
    @AP


    ...Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.
     
    So according to you Porky, Timoshenko and the endless oligarchs on Maidan never stole anything? That's why we think of you as a bit retarded, keep it up.

    "Evidence"? Can you put 2 and 2 together? Zelko's sponsor Kolomoisky is in jail for a few hundred million he swiped, defense minister was caught red-handed and resigned, Porky and the Kiev "better people" are shopping London, Vienna, Geneva...like there is no tomorrow...buying palaces in Florida. Enough?

    40 billion in cash was sent with no audit - US Congress words, not mine...cars with bags of cash stopped on the border, there are videos..do you want a taped confession? Is that your standard every time corruption takes place around the world? (do you work for Biden?)


    Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft
     
    They have and media mostly ignores it. We are in a war, these things are trifles and the powers in the West ordered that the media focus on winning the war - anything that would undermine the narrative has been put on ice...Wars are best time for corruption, motivation is sky-high: free money, no future in Ukraine, minimal oversight, welcome mat in the West...is that too complicated for you? but we understand that you have a mind of 10-year old (Viva Habsburgs!!!).

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war
     
    You did couple months ago...with you usual weasel provisos. But ok, if not 10k or 100k (or 300k that I think is exaggerated) - what is your estimate of Ukie casualties in the war? And also, was it worth it? What has it accomplished?

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West.
     
    Ukraine pledged by the Budapest treaty to be neutral. They first broke that with Yushenko - remember the Orange loser with 5% approval in 2010? - then with Maidan. If you swear neutrality and then try to join Nato, you are by definition in violation of everything - all the lame talk today intentionally leaves that out.

    It was Kiev that first bombed and is still bombing Donbas - their own citizens!!! There are 5 million people there, the losses have been less than 1%, they will survive it. But I suspect they will forever remember what you crazy Galician quasi-Nazis did to them. If they ever make it to Kiev or Lviv, it will be ugly. But you don't care about them - you even suggested that millions of Russian who have lived in that region that became a part of Ukraine should leave. Quite extraordinary to openly call for what would be a genocide. But you guys are so narcissistic you are unable to see it. "Russians?" Damn, anything can be done to them, no rules apply - right?

    Replies: @AP

  81. @A123
    @AP



    Zelensky Leaves Empty-Handed — McConnell Admits Ukraine Aid Talks Going Nowhere, Punts to January

     

    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky will come up empty in his latest swing through the U.S. Capitol.

    Negotiations on additional American aid to Ukraine paired with a border security package are dead for 2023, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly told his fellow Senate Republicans at their weekly lunch Tuesday.
     

    You said he got zero.

    Is $200 million zero?
     

    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations. This meaning was obvious to those familiar with U.S. government. I referenced SENATOR McConnell by name, and his capitulation in the CONGRESSIONAL appropriations process.

    I repeated the quote for you again, with the obvious points in bold so you do not miss painfully obvious facts about the objectively true & obvious facts again.

    Stating that the executive branch released a dribble from a previous appropriation badly misses the actual and incredibly obvious factual point I made about CONGRESS and new funding.

    Is zero in NEW congressional appropriation $200M?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP

    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations

    Your words were “Zero for Zelensky.”

    If you had stated what you state now, you would have been correct.

    But you did not state that Zelensky received zero in new appropriations.

    The excerpt from Foxnews contradicted your statement; the footnote did not match the claim.

    Good that you have revised and clarified your statement to reflect what had actually occurred.

    Zelensky did not get a deal for 2023 for anything, but did receive a $200 million tranche from the $4.6 billion (now $4.4 billion) still remaining.

    • Replies: @A123
    @AP

    I accept your apology.

    Thank you for retracting your attempt to revise my original accurate statement. Your admission that my original intent was obvious, clear, and accurate is appreciated.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

  82. @AP
    @A123


    What I said was that Zelensky received zero from CONGRESS in new appropriations
     
    Your words were “Zero for Zelensky.”

    If you had stated what you state now, you would have been correct.

    But you did not state that Zelensky received zero in new appropriations.

    The excerpt from Foxnews contradicted your statement; the footnote did not match the claim.

    Good that you have revised and clarified your statement to reflect what had actually occurred.

    Zelensky did not get a deal for 2023 for anything, but did receive a $200 million tranche from the $4.6 billion (now $4.4 billion) still remaining.

    Replies: @A123

    I accept your apology.

    Thank you for retracting your attempt to revise my original accurate statement. Your admission that my original intent was obvious, clear, and accurate is appreciated.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @AP
    @A123

    You misstated your point originally (your statement that Zelensky got zero was incorrect, and wasn’t supported by the information in the footnote), but then provided an accurate correction. Good for you for not doubling down. I give credit where credit is due.

    Replies: @A123

    , @Mikel
    @A123


    I accept your apology.
     
    I also accept AP's apology to you. One needs to be magnanimous always.

    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP's idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all. This is a line that he's kept repeating for months now so there is no hope that he'll abandon it. He'd rather spend sleepless nights defending it post after post with a hundred graphs. But it doesn't make any sense. On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed. Impossible to believe.

    On the other hand, it doesn't even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt (as long as demand for the gargantuan US debt continues to exist), the interests of which we also have to pay with our taxes. In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog but we should feel grateful about it lol.

    Replies: @AP

  83. @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    Let me help you out, there were some protests in Japan just a few years back. A couple of soldiers got drunk and "raped" a woman during their night out on the town, Although a despicable act, so what? A couple of protests over the last 75 years in over 600 bases, all related to drunk and misbehaving servicemen? Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

    Replies: @songbird

    A couple of soldiers got drunk and “raped” a woman during their night out on the town

    LMAO. Why are you putting it in quotation marks? IIRC there’s been a couple of incidents, including these two with corpuses delicti:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-42192571

    But you’re being overly reductive. There are many reasons not to want US troops around beyond these incidents (including if you are American), and I don’t think it’s the main motivation for many.

    Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

    surely, a straw man. Many EEs probably want more US bases. Likely as do some of these these very small states, like Qatar or Djibouti.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    I wasn't sure what exactly the charges were and if they were indeed proven. I was going on my recollections, and didn't have any time to research the issue. "Straw man" how so?

    Replies: @songbird

  84. @Mr. Hack
    @Derer

    And everyone of them would cry bloody murder if the US closed down any base and left. All bases are the source of business opportunities and jobs for the locals. Name even one of these host countries that wants the US to go?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Derer

    The French gave them the boot and the Germans, Dutch, Norwegians, British, Italians, and Spaniards would give them the boot after 30 seconds of deliberation if the people had anything to say about it.

    Are you drunk?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Well, goes to show you that the US does not force countries to accept their bases, although I'm sure pressure and some dealing goes on behind the scenes, with those that acquiesce. I'm not aware of the situation in Spain...have their been demonstrations against the base there by the local population?

  85. @Mr. XYZ
    I've got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line? And, if so, could Germany and Austria-Hungary arm the Ottomans enough and build up the Ottoman military enough up to the point that the Ottoman military can do to Russia what Ukraine did to Russia in the Russo-Ukrainian War in real life? As in, ensure that Russia walks away with nothing other than some modest gains, but with the core of the Ottoman Empire remaining intact and with the Ottoman Empire itself remaining very strong.

    (Note: During WWI in real life, the Ottoman Empire was not that strong. But if the Ottoman Empire will aggressively build up its military with the help of the Germanic powers over the next 10-15 years or more, then it could be in a much better position in a future hypothetical war against Russia. Russia would have also aggressively trounced Ukraine in 2014 in real life, after all. But by 2022, it couldn't even conquer Kharkiv or Odessa or Mykolayiv or hold onto Kherson.)

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @AP

    I’ve got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line

    I think there’s something to be said for historical records, and Russia had a good record of beating the Ottomans. Since 1768 it beat them in every war other than the Crimean War in which the Ottomans themselves were beaten by the Russians, but the Russians were defeated by the Ottomans’ British and French allies. So it would likely have won in another war with them.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Fair point about historical records, but it's worth noting that the Ottomans might have been fighting more passionately to defend their historical homeland (Anatolia) than they would have been in fighting to defend some peripheral areas. (The Turks were able to reverse and undo the Treaty of Sevres after WWI in real life, though it probably helped that Russia was Communist and thus uninterested in further imperialism in Anatolia.) And would close ties with the Germanic powers have meant nothing for the Ottoman Empire? No opportunities at all for the Germanic powers to significantly help the Ottomans improve their military, similar to how the West helped Ukraine significantly improve its own military between 2014 and 2022 in real life? I can't be certain of this, but I would think that the Germanic countries had more modern militaries relative to Russia; at least, I would suspect that this would be true of pre-WWI Germany since it was a much bigger scientific and technological hub relative to Russia. Germany could have sold or even given some of its military technology to the Ottomans, including the advanced stuff, just so long as the Ottomans knew how to properly use them. (Turks are duller on average than Germans are, but still smarter on average than Arabs and Kurds are. The Ottoman troops fighting the Russians would very likely in large part be Turks due to reasons of geography and logistics.)

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  86. @A123
    @AP

    I accept your apology.

    Thank you for retracting your attempt to revise my original accurate statement. Your admission that my original intent was obvious, clear, and accurate is appreciated.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

    You misstated your point originally (your statement that Zelensky got zero was incorrect, and wasn’t supported by the information in the footnote), but then provided an accurate correction. Good for you for not doubling down. I give credit where credit is due.

    • Replies: @A123
    @AP

    Thank you for admitting that I successfully corrected your misinterpretation. You took my original point out of context. It should have been obvious that it was tied to a story about the SENATOR McConnell. And thus, was exclusively about about new CONGRESSIONAL appropriation.

    Good for you with admitting your error & not doubling down. I give credit where credit is due.

    PEACE 😇

  87. @QCIC
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The military in both Koreas probably feel like they are next. If NATO were to be successful in Ukraine the USA might use South Korea to pressure North Korea and ultimately China and Russia. Besides, North Korea can use the money and South Korea is probably bored.

    Shells like that are easy to make. The lack of ammo from the West is a sign of lack of will, not of ability. I wonder which country will buy the 155 ammo from Russia?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I think this is Fake News, but I’m interested in your opinion.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @A123
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    You can judge the story's credibility based on these points from the article:


    All three individuals, like others in this story, were granted anonymity to speak freely about the president’s thinking.
    ...

    The Trump campaign denies that he has changed his stance toward North Korea in any way. “These ‘sources’ have no idea what they are talking about and do not speak for President Trump or his campaign,” said spokesperson Steven Cheung.
     
    It is probably outright fake news, but there is a slim chance it was a trial balloon that did not lift. There is no way to know for sure.

    PEACE 😇
    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I'm thinking about browsing tinder THOTs. I'm thinking about buying a television set and a cable contract.

    Twitter is garbage. I'm not even thinking about signing up for a TwitterX account. That was a great tweet a couple of weeks ago though with the six Israel school children singing the song about annihilating Gaza.

    , @QCIC
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    It sounds OK to me since the USA doesn't have much say in what happens in North Korea. I don't remember what Trump's prior position is toward the DPRK.

    I assume North and South Korea will naturally reunite at some point. I suspect Trump would be for this if the cost is otherwise low. He might want to take some credit for peacemaking.

    As the SMO winds down Russia may naturally begin to support the DPRK much more strongly the way the Soviets did. Previously Russia was concerned about sanctions and now they no longer have to worry about this. A renewed strong bond between Russia and North Korea may gradually pressure South Korea and Japan to become more moderate with respect to Russia.

    I think Russia has a shared interest with reunited Korea and Japan being independent and strong and the three states mutually operating as a counter balance to China. For the moment Russia may actually approve of the Western heckling of China since it keeps her somewhat in check.

    Probably the best case scenario is that Russia helps North Korea build back up economically. The both can become more prosperous while retaining some "old school values" which the West has lost, including the rapidly declining South Korea. Once North Korea looks a bit stronger and a bit nicer reunification might be straightforward.

  88. @AP
    @A123

    You misstated your point originally (your statement that Zelensky got zero was incorrect, and wasn’t supported by the information in the footnote), but then provided an accurate correction. Good for you for not doubling down. I give credit where credit is due.

    Replies: @A123

    Thank you for admitting that I successfully corrected your misinterpretation. You took my original point out of context. It should have been obvious that it was tied to a story about the SENATOR McConnell. And thus, was exclusively about about new CONGRESSIONAL appropriation.

    Good for you with admitting your error & not doubling down. I give credit where credit is due.

    PEACE 😇

  89. @Beckow
    @QCIC

    My sense is the visit to Washington was improvised, they are now making it up day-by-day. Nato knows that Ukies can't hold militarily in the long run but they lack the B team to negotiate a face-saving climb down. (Where is the fat German Frau when you need her?)

    Everyone is positioning for the coming blame game: not enough weapons, bad execution of the offensive, Israel-Gaza, US internal politics - the ghost of Trump, Euros lacking martial spirit and fickleness... Zelko wanted to see the capo di tutti capi in person: he knows there is the Western public posture and there is the reality - but what's the timing...and are they really sending him to Argentina?

    The problem is that Zelko and his entourage anywhere in the West after the war could be embarrassing: interviews, recriminations, where did all the money go...but Argentina looks so post-WW2 Nazi like...it is a mess...

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikhail

  90. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @QCIC

    I think this is Fake News, but I'm interested in your opinion.



    https://twitter.com/alexbward/status/1734892249257738420

    Replies: @A123, @Emil Nikola Richard, @QCIC

    You can judge the story’s credibility based on these points from the article:

    All three individuals, like others in this story, were granted anonymity to speak freely about the president’s thinking.

    The Trump campaign denies that he has changed his stance toward North Korea in any way. “These ‘sources’ have no idea what they are talking about and do not speak for President Trump or his campaign,” said spokesperson Steven Cheung.

    It is probably outright fake news, but there is a slim chance it was a trial balloon that did not lift. There is no way to know for sure.

    PEACE 😇

  91. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @QCIC

    I think this is Fake News, but I'm interested in your opinion.



    https://twitter.com/alexbward/status/1734892249257738420

    Replies: @A123, @Emil Nikola Richard, @QCIC

    I’m thinking about browsing tinder THOTs. I’m thinking about buying a television set and a cable contract.

    Twitter is garbage. I’m not even thinking about signing up for a TwitterX account. That was a great tweet a couple of weeks ago though with the six Israel school children singing the song about annihilating Gaza.

  92. @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    Well, Korea only became divided as a result of Soviet entry.
     
    That is quite horrible, a friend mine has a half-Korean friend whose family was apparently split up. :(

    If you go back further, Russo-Japanese War was because Nicolaus wanted both Manchuria and Korea
     
    That is a really cool picture of the Black Octopus. Indeed, already so large, and yet still so full of avarice.

    Btw, if you're interested, I can share a bit about the Latvians who participated in the Russo-Japanese war (as part of the Tsar's army). I'm not too happy that they were there, killing Japanese, but at the time that's how the Empire was run.

    Here is a little write up from our history encyclopedia (you can see how this far off war shaped some of the later political events). It doesn't seem like a huge number of people but many of them were highly specialized:

    In the Russo-Japanese War, for the first time, Latvians participated en masse in modern warfare as military personnel involved in the service of the Russian Army and Navy - officers, soldiers and sailors, military officials, paramedics and pharmacists, as well as priests.

    The impact of the war extended beyond the military sphere and permeated Latvian society. The war's influence was evident in factors associated with the 1905 revolution. As early as 1904, the war's events began shaping the trajectory of Latvian urban industry (for example, a large order for railway wagons was received by the "Fenikss" factory in Riga, where around 2000 workers worked).

    The war significantly activated the social democratic groups established in the previous years in the industrial centers of Riga, Liepāja, Jelgava and Daugavpils, which started anti-war propaganda, there was some cooperation between Latvian, Polish, Lithuanian and Belarusian social democrats, for example, they issued a joint anti-war proclamation, while emphasizing the fact of national oppression.

    Latvian left-wing political groups, unlike the radical wing of the Polish Socialist Party, did not, however, get involved in supporting Russia's open enemy - Japan, although it was done by the prominent social democrat, editor of the newspaper "Struggle" Janis Jansons-Braun (in 07.01.1905, he reported from Liepāja to the General Staff of the Japanese Army about the activities of the Russian Navy).

    Recruitment

    In the Baltic governorates' territory, multiple mobilizations of military personnel in the army reserve occurred, involving troops in local garrisons. Within the regiments stationed in the European part of Russia, a selection of officers was made through a lottery system, and these chosen officers were then deployed to the front in the Far East. Latvians were among those selected, with a notable concentration of officers of Latvian origin in the troops stationed in the Baltic and surrounding provinces.

    Troop units, mobilized reservists, armaments, military equipment, and supplementary food supplies were transported from the European part of Russia to the war zone exclusively through the Trans-Siberian railway. The journey along this vital transport artery spanned 5 to 6 weeks.

    Description of the Latvian contingent and their military activity

    A total of at least 179 officers of Latvian nationality (most in infantry units), as well as about 60-80 enlisted officers (praporshchiks) mainly in infantry units and artillery, about 60-80 paramedics, pharmacists and military officials, as well as 2,500-3,000 soldiers and sailors participated in the hostilities.

    The companies were commanded by about 40-50 officers of Latvian nationality, there were also many younger officers, and most of them were awarded with combat orders.

    Some Latvians also served in the artillery units at the front, and took part in the battle at Mukden, served as task officers for communications with the Port Arthur fortress in the Manchurian Army's War Traffic Department. Some ran mobilization efforts.

    Captain astronomer Andrejs Auzans served in the topographers' unit in the 2nd Manchurian War. Several Latvians held positions in structures that cared for the wounded: Lieutenant Vilhelms Kaminskis was the manager of the hospital in Khabarovsk; lieutenant Jānis Miglavs – manager of the infirmary of the 54th division; captain Jānis Krastiņš – manager of the 63rd mobile field hospital and others. The former police chief of Kwantun and Port Arthur, lieutenant colonel Indriķis Lediņš, performed special tasks during the war as the commander of a special troops unit, performing tasks related to intelligence.

    Latvian sailors were engaged in combat right from the outset of the war. In the initial weeks, a minimum of six Latvians lost their lives, with three casualties occurring on the sunken cruiser "Varyag." Numerous Latvian sailors, totaling several hundred, served on the ships of the Pacific squadron either due to compulsory service or as part of their call-up for the Russo-Japanese War at the onset of the conflict.

    As in the ground forces, the Navy also had many soldiers and officers of Baltic-German origin.

    Latvian doctors, veterinary doctors, and pharmacists, whether conscripted, volunteers, or serving professionally in the army, participated in the war with Japan. This group included at least five professional army war doctors and approximately 40-50 doctors called up from the reserve. These medical professionals served in various capacities, including military units, infirmaries, hospitals, and Russian Red Cross medical institutions, where Latvian Sisters of Mercy were also present. Additionally, there were pharmacists contributing to the medical efforts at Port Arthur.

    The spiritual care of Latvian, German and Estonian Lutheran soldiers was carried out by Latvian pastors.

    About 200-250 Latvian soldiers and sailors died in the battles, including 12 officers. Many Baltic German officers died, too.

    There were many wounded and captured. Around 150-200 Latvian soldiers and sailors were captured, and were released at the end of 1905-1906. One of the soldiers saved the imperial monogram attached to the regimental flag during his captivity.

    The conflict with Japan marked the inaugural instance of substantial Latvian military participation in a 20th-century war. Latvians, including officers, military medics, pharmacists, and military officials, were actively involved. This engagement provided them with valuable exposure to modern combat, significantly influencing their career advancement. The experience gained in this conflict played a pivotal role in shaping the actions of Latvian soldiers during the subsequent First World War and the Latvian War of Independence.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Thanks dear, a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia, just like a lot of EEs were pro-Japan. This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Georg_von_Möllendorff

    Here’s a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries

    [MORE]

    In 1903, the Latvian Social Democratic Union of Western Europe, in cooperation with the Latvian Social Democrats of the USA, founded the Latvian Social Democratic Union (LSS), the majority of whose members lived in London and Switzerland and were led by Miķelis Valters and Ernests Rolavs. At the beginning of the 1905 Revolution, the party had many members in Latvia and in May the LSS had about 1000 members. Already in the summer of 1905, some members of the party began to attack the estates. Members of the LSS organised the illegal transport of literature and weapons from Western Europe to the Russian Empire, which involved members of the London branch of the LSS Juris Šenbergs, Ernest Augusts Minka, Vilis Štrauss and Captain Janis Treimanis[1].

    During the Russo-Japanese War, in March 1905, the Japanese War Ministry allocated 1 million yen for the purchase and delivery of arms to support the Russian Revolution.[2] The Japanese military attaché in Stockholm, Colonel Motojiro Akashi, took the money to London and handed it over to the “United Fighting Organisation” (UBO), which had been formed by Russian émigrés. As an employee of the Japanese Embassy in St Petersburg, he had already established contacts with Russian oppositionists, including the Finnish politician Konrad (Konni) Zilliacus in 1902.

    A member of the group posing as the wine merchant Robert Richard Dickenson bought the English steamer John Grafton, built in 1883. According to the testimony of the later Soviet diplomat Litvinov, arms were bought for 100 000 roubles and a plan was drawn up to ship them to several Finnish ports. Latvians Minka, Wagner, Strauss and Salniņš took part in the procurement of the weapons.

    https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graftona_avantūra

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia
     
    An interesting tid-bit, before Korea was annexed by Japan the country was spelt Corea. After its annexation and subjugation by Japan, the Japanese were so petty they didn’t want Corea to be listed alphabetically in front of Japan so its spelling was forcibly changed by Japan from Corea to Korea.
    , @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Thanks, interesting links.


    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia
     
    It's understandable, but they weren't as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia
     
    Great photo, you can tell the guy was totally into languages and "going native". He's German Prussian, btw, so practically Baltic German, one can say.

    "Möllendorff also advocated that Korea enter into an alliance with the Russian Empire to counterbalance Chinese and Japanese influences on the Korean peninsula." (Wiki)

    Alliance is different than being completely swamped. Hard to say what is more useful here, doing translations or political advisory.


    Here’s a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries
     
    Thanks, this was quite an operation, what is fascinating about it is just the sheer geographic span of all these connections and how they trailed and connected towards a common result. Btw, this org, those were not Bolshes, but social democrats of that time, which by today's standards would be a sort of republican or simply people who wanted modernization (which by the European standards of those times just meant basic rights). Also, to stop Russification of local nationalities.

    And the punitive action after 1905 was just insanely brutal (ordered by Nikolai). Executing, whipping to the point where people were crippled for life, torturing, even women. This was done by Tsar's Cossacks that were brought in. When you do that to your subjects, in the 20th century, you should know it's over. Although there was both good and bad in the Empire.

    And, btw, the modern Latvians (and Estonians) themselves do not like addressing this at all - burning the German estates is really looked down upon, as a shameful piece of history, anything openly anti-German is a big "no no" these days, so very different from those times. But once you start educating them, they start having sympathy for those folks who lived a 100 years ago.

    It is good to be able to look at those times with the distance we have now.

    From what I understand, Japan's collaboration with the Poles was deeper but it's interesting to see that it even reached Finns and Latvians. I'm sure a lot can be found in the revolutionary letters and diaries and such.

    Btw, there is a map that shows the route of the ships that went from Latvia towards Japan (the route is Liepaja to Vladivostok), all the way around Africa. I don't know how to post the map but if you open this link and scroll down, in the middle of the article you'll see three maps, and one of them shows it (the smaller one) - a red line that goes through the Suez canal and towards Asia. 30 warships and 25 cargo ships. They were insane.

    You can see it in this link:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/skirklis/64752-Krievijas%E2%80%93Jap%C4%81nas-kar%C5%A1

    Japanese troops in defense positions:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/api/image/original?name=df0390c82195-2986d039-2f42-438f-8173-1746c0e0ee19.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Another thing I wanted to share: here is a Lithuanian travel blogger who went to both North and South Korea and compared the two (he delves into the history a little, but just on the surface).

    He spent 7 days in North Korea (that's all a foreign tourist is allowed to spend there) and that travelogue is somewhat positive (and non-ideological), however, later he posts another video where he discourages visiting N.Korea (because of the heavy toll that the stringent social and political regulations exact on the individual human being in North Korea and how the freedoms are impacted).

    And Seoul is truly amazing. He found a friend who had apparently escaped North Korea to South Korea. Not sure how objective this blogger is, there are good bits about both countries.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM0hZt91SW8&t=368s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMoSyk0rK9s&t=658s

    And there is a documentary about North Korea, "Under the Sun", by a Russian director Vitaly Mansky (who bailed Putin's Russia and has been living in Latvia for a long time now). It looks like some North Koreans didn't like it, but when I watched it, it didn't seem too bad to me, it showed that the living standards there are actually not bad (also it showed a lot of color, which is different because North Korean is typically portrayed as drab by Westerners). But one can see that it is a hyper-organized society.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_the_Sun_(2015_film)

  93. Ray McGovern: What Happens When Government Lies Are Exposed.

  94. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    China, a country you have zero history or interaction
     
    Not true, Chinese and Latvians fought together for the Reds (not a flattering depiction here though)

    https://i.postimg.cc/7YNg709Q/Sukuri-nshotto-1.png

    https://www.rbth.com/history/333135-how-chinese-soldiers-helped-bolsheviks

    Both Chinese and Japanese also supported the Whites and Czech Legion

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Kaartje_amerikanen_in_Rusland-1-.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I highly recommend the book Tennozan by George Fiefer, about the battle of Okinawa and the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan. Incredible stuff, it includes a funny story of a Kamikaze pilot who, after the sacramental saki and everything, took to the skies on his mission, but doubled back and strafed his celebratory comrades before actually heading out.

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The Japanese were engaged in a very nasty imperialism. It was that imperialism that brought them into conflict with the Chinese and then the Americans, nothing else. Don’t do it, no conflict.

    The one point to be made in defense of Germany and Japan in the 20th century wars was that they were rising in a world where market access had already been divied up by British and French and to a much lesser extent American, Dutch, Belgian … imperialism. It was not ridiculous for Germany and Japan to find the existing order to be offensive and want to remake it. And if they had openly pushed for decolonization and open trade the eventual post WW2 system they would have had allies in the project like America and China.

    But the Japanese had first grabbed Korea as a colony, then created their Manchukuo sock puppet state, then started the War by invading China a place that the Western powers had not colonized as it was so large and important that there was a general agreement that no one power should be allowed to dominate it (or perhaps could dominate it).

    Prior to it’s naked imperialism, Meiji Japan had a pretty good reputation in the world. It was seen as a modern, Westernizing, can do kind of place. A shining light amongst Asian backwardness.

    The reputation of the Japanese in Asia after the WW2 pretty much tells you all you need to know about Japan’s imperialism and aggression. In no way shape or form was it self defense.

  95. This past year, I have found some amusing clips on YouTube of people petting different animals, such as wild skunks and Canada geese. But I think the culmination is these people petting porcupines.

    [MORE]

  96. @LondonBob
    @Beckow

    Not really, Argentina looks more like present day Ukraine or 90s Russia, very much oligarch dominated. Hopefully Millei will do some good, can't do any worse. Argentina has a lot of mineral wealth, they should exploit that and generate some wealth, as the more successful Latin American countries do.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    Hopefully Millei will do some good, can’t do any worse.

    Russian joke:
    The pessimist says:
    – Everything is so bad, it cannot get any worse.
    The optimist replies:
    – But surely it can!

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @AnonfromTN

    From my ISP the first big headline after Millei's election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

  97. @AnonfromTN
    @LondonBob


    Hopefully Millei will do some good, can’t do any worse.
     
    Russian joke:
    The pessimist says:
    - Everything is so bad, it cannot get any worse.
    The optimist replies:
    - But surely it can!

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    From my ISP the first big headline after Millei’s election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    the first big headline after Millei’s election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.
     
    Israel is busily digging its grave. What’s more, Israeli crimes in Gaza damaged the US even more than Israel itself (nobody expected anything good from Israel, anyway). So, if that certifiable mental case wants Argentina to go down with Israel, good luck to him. Except for vulture funds, Argentina is no more important for the world than Kabo Verde or Tuvalu.

    Replies: @Mikhail

  98. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I highly recommend the book Tennozan by George Fiefer, about the battle of Okinawa and the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan. Incredible stuff, it includes a funny story of a Kamikaze pilot who, after the sacramental saki and everything, took to the skies on his mission, but doubled back and strafed his celebratory comrades before actually heading out.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The Japanese were engaged in a very nasty imperialism. It was that imperialism that brought them into conflict with the Chinese and then the Americans, nothing else. Don’t do it, no conflict.

    The one point to be made in defense of Germany and Japan in the 20th century wars was that they were rising in a world where market access had already been divied up by British and French and to a much lesser extent American, Dutch, Belgian … imperialism. It was not ridiculous for Germany and Japan to find the existing order to be offensive and want to remake it. And if they had openly pushed for decolonization and open trade the eventual post WW2 system they would have had allies in the project like America and China.

    But the Japanese had first grabbed Korea as a colony, then created their Manchukuo sock puppet state, then started the War by invading China a place that the Western powers had not colonized as it was so large and important that there was a general agreement that no one power should be allowed to dominate it (or perhaps could dominate it).

    Prior to it’s naked imperialism, Meiji Japan had a pretty good reputation in the world. It was seen as a modern, Westernizing, can do kind of place. A shining light amongst Asian backwardness.

    The reputation of the Japanese in Asia after the WW2 pretty much tells you all you need to know about Japan’s imperialism and aggression. In no way shape or form was it self defense.

  99. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @AnonfromTN

    From my ISP the first big headline after Millei's election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    the first big headline after Millei’s election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.

    Israel is busily digging its grave. What’s more, Israeli crimes in Gaza damaged the US even more than Israel itself (nobody expected anything good from Israel, anyway). So, if that certifiable mental case wants Argentina to go down with Israel, good luck to him. Except for vulture funds, Argentina is no more important for the world than Kabo Verde or Tuvalu.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @AnonfromTN

    Re: https://www.eurasiareview.com/12122023-ukraines-future-oped/

    From a gentle Jewish socialist -

    As for answering your question, which I think is at least a bit rhetorical,
    what else could Putin have done?
    Just about anything except starting an invasion,
    just as Hamas could have done other things besides a pogrom.
    Both those actions must not go unanswered.


    My reply -

    Just as Israel could've done other things besides a bigger pogrom than what Hamas did? There's also the history prior to this past 10/7. As for claims of double standards, Russia has been the party being held to the greater double standard. The banning of the Russian flag and anthem from the upcoming Olympics (being done presently in numerous sports) is sheer bigotry.

    Russia gave peace a seven years chance (regarding the Minsk Accords) as the Kiev regime revamped its arsenal and increased attacks on Donbass.

  100. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    I’ve got an alternate history question for AP: In the event that WWI does not break out in 1914 (Franz Ferdinand lives), would it be possible for Russia to attack the Ottoman Empire again sometime down the line
     
    I think there’s something to be said for historical records, and Russia had a good record of beating the Ottomans. Since 1768 it beat them in every war other than the Crimean War in which the Ottomans themselves were beaten by the Russians, but the Russians were defeated by the Ottomans’ British and French allies. So it would likely have won in another war with them.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    Fair point about historical records, but it’s worth noting that the Ottomans might have been fighting more passionately to defend their historical homeland (Anatolia) than they would have been in fighting to defend some peripheral areas. (The Turks were able to reverse and undo the Treaty of Sevres after WWI in real life, though it probably helped that Russia was Communist and thus uninterested in further imperialism in Anatolia.) And would close ties with the Germanic powers have meant nothing for the Ottoman Empire? No opportunities at all for the Germanic powers to significantly help the Ottomans improve their military, similar to how the West helped Ukraine significantly improve its own military between 2014 and 2022 in real life? I can’t be certain of this, but I would think that the Germanic countries had more modern militaries relative to Russia; at least, I would suspect that this would be true of pre-WWI Germany since it was a much bigger scientific and technological hub relative to Russia. Germany could have sold or even given some of its military technology to the Ottomans, including the advanced stuff, just so long as the Ottomans knew how to properly use them. (Turks are duller on average than Germans are, but still smarter on average than Arabs and Kurds are. The Ottoman troops fighting the Russians would very likely in large part be Turks due to reasons of geography and logistics.)

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @Mr. XYZ

    As a side note, if there is no WWI in 1914 and it looks like Russia is on the verge of winning another war against the Ottoman Empire and thus in dismembering the Ottoman Empire in the 1920s or 1930s or beyond, I think that the question of whether Germany and Austria-Hungary would directly militarily intervene in the war might depend a lot on what Britain does. Britain was friendly with Russia in 1914, but without WWI, there's a very real risk that there could be a growing British fear of growing Russian military power over time. If so, and if Britain indicates that it is willing to fight to preserve the Ottoman Empire, then likely so would Germany and Austria-Hungary, in which case France would have to decide whether to remain neutral or to honor its alliance with Russia (which, TBF, might not apply in this case since AFAIK, the Franco-Russian alliance was officially defensive, and Germany won't be attacking France without a French DOW here since the Schlieffen Plan would already become long outdated due to growing Russian military power).

    If Britain indicates that it is not willing to fight on behalf of the Ottoman Empire, however, then we might very well see an outright partition of the Ottoman Empire between the various Great Powers in this scenario, unless of course Russia indicates that it would merely be content with Ottoman Armenia while allowing the Ottomans to keep the rest of their empire, including Constantinople, intact. I don't think that the Ottoman Empire can survive a loss of Constantinople, however. Too big and too vital/crucial.

  101. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Thanks dear, a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia, just like a lot of EEs were pro-Japan. This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Paul_Georg_von_M%C3%B6llendorff_%281847-1901%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Georg_von_Möllendorff

    Here's a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries


    In 1903, the Latvian Social Democratic Union of Western Europe, in cooperation with the Latvian Social Democrats of the USA, founded the Latvian Social Democratic Union (LSS), the majority of whose members lived in London and Switzerland and were led by Miķelis Valters and Ernests Rolavs. At the beginning of the 1905 Revolution, the party had many members in Latvia and in May the LSS had about 1000 members. Already in the summer of 1905, some members of the party began to attack the estates. Members of the LSS organised the illegal transport of literature and weapons from Western Europe to the Russian Empire, which involved members of the London branch of the LSS Juris Šenbergs, Ernest Augusts Minka, Vilis Štrauss and Captain Janis Treimanis[1].

    During the Russo-Japanese War, in March 1905, the Japanese War Ministry allocated 1 million yen for the purchase and delivery of arms to support the Russian Revolution.[2] The Japanese military attaché in Stockholm, Colonel Motojiro Akashi, took the money to London and handed it over to the "United Fighting Organisation" (UBO), which had been formed by Russian émigrés. As an employee of the Japanese Embassy in St Petersburg, he had already established contacts with Russian oppositionists, including the Finnish politician Konrad (Konni) Zilliacus in 1902.

    A member of the group posing as the wine merchant Robert Richard Dickenson bought the English steamer John Grafton, built in 1883. According to the testimony of the later Soviet diplomat Litvinov, arms were bought for 100 000 roubles and a plan was drawn up to ship them to several Finnish ports. Latvians Minka, Wagner, Strauss and Salniņš took part in the procurement of the weapons.
     

    https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graftona_avantūra

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @LatW, @LatW

    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia

    An interesting tid-bit, before Korea was annexed by Japan the country was spelt Corea. After its annexation and subjugation by Japan, the Japanese were so petty they didn’t want Corea to be listed alphabetically in front of Japan so its spelling was forcibly changed by Japan from Corea to Korea.

    • Thanks: Mr. XYZ
  102. @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Fair point about historical records, but it's worth noting that the Ottomans might have been fighting more passionately to defend their historical homeland (Anatolia) than they would have been in fighting to defend some peripheral areas. (The Turks were able to reverse and undo the Treaty of Sevres after WWI in real life, though it probably helped that Russia was Communist and thus uninterested in further imperialism in Anatolia.) And would close ties with the Germanic powers have meant nothing for the Ottoman Empire? No opportunities at all for the Germanic powers to significantly help the Ottomans improve their military, similar to how the West helped Ukraine significantly improve its own military between 2014 and 2022 in real life? I can't be certain of this, but I would think that the Germanic countries had more modern militaries relative to Russia; at least, I would suspect that this would be true of pre-WWI Germany since it was a much bigger scientific and technological hub relative to Russia. Germany could have sold or even given some of its military technology to the Ottomans, including the advanced stuff, just so long as the Ottomans knew how to properly use them. (Turks are duller on average than Germans are, but still smarter on average than Arabs and Kurds are. The Ottoman troops fighting the Russians would very likely in large part be Turks due to reasons of geography and logistics.)

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    As a side note, if there is no WWI in 1914 and it looks like Russia is on the verge of winning another war against the Ottoman Empire and thus in dismembering the Ottoman Empire in the 1920s or 1930s or beyond, I think that the question of whether Germany and Austria-Hungary would directly militarily intervene in the war might depend a lot on what Britain does. Britain was friendly with Russia in 1914, but without WWI, there’s a very real risk that there could be a growing British fear of growing Russian military power over time. If so, and if Britain indicates that it is willing to fight to preserve the Ottoman Empire, then likely so would Germany and Austria-Hungary, in which case France would have to decide whether to remain neutral or to honor its alliance with Russia (which, TBF, might not apply in this case since AFAIK, the Franco-Russian alliance was officially defensive, and Germany won’t be attacking France without a French DOW here since the Schlieffen Plan would already become long outdated due to growing Russian military power).

    If Britain indicates that it is not willing to fight on behalf of the Ottoman Empire, however, then we might very well see an outright partition of the Ottoman Empire between the various Great Powers in this scenario, unless of course Russia indicates that it would merely be content with Ottoman Armenia while allowing the Ottomans to keep the rest of their empire, including Constantinople, intact. I don’t think that the Ottoman Empire can survive a loss of Constantinople, however. Too big and too vital/crucial.

  103. @AP
    @Beckow


    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.
     
    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you
     
    I asked you for evidence that a significant portion of the $40 billion in cash assistance was stolen.

    You provided none.

    You want a number? Well, 1% would be significant. Any evidence of $400 million having been stolen? Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft, surely it would be easy to find evidence of that.

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how
     
    How many do you think Russia has lost since the invasion started in February 2022?

    Or is it 10k as you once claimed?

     

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war (unless I mentioned such a number in early 2022, don’t recall).

    but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991
     
    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @Beckow

    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    Was Kravchuk not a Sovok as well?

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    To be fair, virtually all of Ukraine outside of the far west voted for Kravchuk in 1991. They should have voted for Chornovil if they wanted the post-Communist transition to be led by someone who wasn’t a Sovok.

    I think that this is the central issue here: That a lot of Ukrainians wanted independence in 1991 in the hope of a much better quality of life for themselves but were still determined to vote for Sovoks for a while. Central Ukraine stopped voting for Sovoks first (early 2000s), of course.

  104. Should hostilities once break out between Japan and the United States, it would not be enough that we take Guam and the Philippines, nor even Hawaii and San Francisco. To make victory certain, we would have to march into Washington and dictate the terms of peace in the White House. I wonder if our politicians [who speak so lightly of a Japanese-American war] have confidence as to the final outcome and are prepared to make the necessary sacrifices.

    Yamamoto

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The Japanese gardens on the West Coast are simply incredible. The one in Seattle is stunning. Everything is planted and maintained with such care and showing in complete splendor during the fall season. And the red maple is one of the most beautiful trees on the planet.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Seattle_Japanese_garden_2011_05.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AP

  105. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Thanks dear, a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia, just like a lot of EEs were pro-Japan. This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Paul_Georg_von_M%C3%B6llendorff_%281847-1901%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Georg_von_Möllendorff

    Here's a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries


    In 1903, the Latvian Social Democratic Union of Western Europe, in cooperation with the Latvian Social Democrats of the USA, founded the Latvian Social Democratic Union (LSS), the majority of whose members lived in London and Switzerland and were led by Miķelis Valters and Ernests Rolavs. At the beginning of the 1905 Revolution, the party had many members in Latvia and in May the LSS had about 1000 members. Already in the summer of 1905, some members of the party began to attack the estates. Members of the LSS organised the illegal transport of literature and weapons from Western Europe to the Russian Empire, which involved members of the London branch of the LSS Juris Šenbergs, Ernest Augusts Minka, Vilis Štrauss and Captain Janis Treimanis[1].

    During the Russo-Japanese War, in March 1905, the Japanese War Ministry allocated 1 million yen for the purchase and delivery of arms to support the Russian Revolution.[2] The Japanese military attaché in Stockholm, Colonel Motojiro Akashi, took the money to London and handed it over to the "United Fighting Organisation" (UBO), which had been formed by Russian émigrés. As an employee of the Japanese Embassy in St Petersburg, he had already established contacts with Russian oppositionists, including the Finnish politician Konrad (Konni) Zilliacus in 1902.

    A member of the group posing as the wine merchant Robert Richard Dickenson bought the English steamer John Grafton, built in 1883. According to the testimony of the later Soviet diplomat Litvinov, arms were bought for 100 000 roubles and a plan was drawn up to ship them to several Finnish ports. Latvians Minka, Wagner, Strauss and Salniņš took part in the procurement of the weapons.
     

    https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graftona_avantūra

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @LatW, @LatW

    Thanks, interesting links.

    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia

    It’s understandable, but they weren’t as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    Great photo, you can tell the guy was totally into languages and “going native”. He’s German Prussian, btw, so practically Baltic German, one can say.

    “Möllendorff also advocated that Korea enter into an alliance with the Russian Empire to counterbalance Chinese and Japanese influences on the Korean peninsula.” (Wiki)

    Alliance is different than being completely swamped. Hard to say what is more useful here, doing translations or political advisory.

    [MORE]

    Here’s a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries

    Thanks, this was quite an operation, what is fascinating about it is just the sheer geographic span of all these connections and how they trailed and connected towards a common result. Btw, this org, those were not Bolshes, but social democrats of that time, which by today’s standards would be a sort of republican or simply people who wanted modernization (which by the European standards of those times just meant basic rights). Also, to stop Russification of local nationalities.

    And the punitive action after 1905 was just insanely brutal (ordered by Nikolai). Executing, whipping to the point where people were crippled for life, torturing, even women. This was done by Tsar’s Cossacks that were brought in. When you do that to your subjects, in the 20th century, you should know it’s over. Although there was both good and bad in the Empire.

    And, btw, the modern Latvians (and Estonians) themselves do not like addressing this at all – burning the German estates is really looked down upon, as a shameful piece of history, anything openly anti-German is a big “no no” these days, so very different from those times. But once you start educating them, they start having sympathy for those folks who lived a 100 years ago.

    It is good to be able to look at those times with the distance we have now.

    From what I understand, Japan’s collaboration with the Poles was deeper but it’s interesting to see that it even reached Finns and Latvians. I’m sure a lot can be found in the revolutionary letters and diaries and such.

    Btw, there is a map that shows the route of the ships that went from Latvia towards Japan (the route is Liepaja to Vladivostok), all the way around Africa. I don’t know how to post the map but if you open this link and scroll down, in the middle of the article you’ll see three maps, and one of them shows it (the smaller one) – a red line that goes through the Suez canal and towards Asia. 30 warships and 25 cargo ships. They were insane.

    You can see it in this link:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/skirklis/64752-Krievijas%E2%80%93Jap%C4%81nas-kar%C5%A1

    Japanese troops in defense positions:

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @LatW


    It’s understandable, but they weren’t as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

     

    On a related note, why did the Soviet Union not annex North Korea after WWII? Was it for similar reasons as to why it did not annex Mongolia during the decades of the Cold War? Or would annexing North Korea have simply not been accepted by the North Korean population, even by their Communists, due to it looking like a predatory imperialist act?

    Korea as a part of the Russian Empire or, alternatively, as a part of a reformed liberal non-Bolshevik-ruled post-Tsarist Russia would certainly be very interesting. I'm just not sure that it's actually realistic, unfortunately.

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW


    It’s understandable, but they weren’t as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?
     
    No, they tried to enter into some secret agreements with Russia. And the Korean king representing a faction took refuge with Russians

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gojong%27s_internal_exile_to_the_Russian_legation

    It was complicated because Joseon was a Manchu Qing tributary at the time. Qing preferred to keep Joseon static and backwards, this is a depiction of the yangban elite class sitting on top of peasants
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Danwon-Byeo.tajak.jpg
    But Manchu-Mongol rule was crumbling, Han Chinese were dominating the Qing court. Japan and Russia were rising as two great powers of NE Asia. So both Koreans and Chinese were playing off between the two.

    The Han Chinese PM of Qing also entered into a secret backdoor deal with Russia, then turned around and pleaded to Japan to remove Russia from Manchuria

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li–Lobanov_Treaty

    Nicholaus refusing Korea-Manchuria exchange was one of the fateful turning points of 20th CE. No Russo-Japanese War means probably no Bolsheviks, no Nazis, etc...But there was a lot of money involved with timber, Yul Brynner's grandfather was involved
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Rosenda_Monteros_and_Yul_Brynner_in_The_Magnificent_Seven_%281960%29.jpg

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Бринер,_Юлий_Иванович

    You do "right click"->"copy image link"

    https://enciklopedija.lv/api/image/original?name=0df0ac0f61e1-f5134f54-0ae1-4310-8ee9-9cb6859aeaa3.jpg

  106. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @LatW

    Thanks dear, a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia, just like a lot of EEs were pro-Japan. This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Paul_Georg_von_M%C3%B6llendorff_%281847-1901%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Georg_von_Möllendorff

    Here's a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries


    In 1903, the Latvian Social Democratic Union of Western Europe, in cooperation with the Latvian Social Democrats of the USA, founded the Latvian Social Democratic Union (LSS), the majority of whose members lived in London and Switzerland and were led by Miķelis Valters and Ernests Rolavs. At the beginning of the 1905 Revolution, the party had many members in Latvia and in May the LSS had about 1000 members. Already in the summer of 1905, some members of the party began to attack the estates. Members of the LSS organised the illegal transport of literature and weapons from Western Europe to the Russian Empire, which involved members of the London branch of the LSS Juris Šenbergs, Ernest Augusts Minka, Vilis Štrauss and Captain Janis Treimanis[1].

    During the Russo-Japanese War, in March 1905, the Japanese War Ministry allocated 1 million yen for the purchase and delivery of arms to support the Russian Revolution.[2] The Japanese military attaché in Stockholm, Colonel Motojiro Akashi, took the money to London and handed it over to the "United Fighting Organisation" (UBO), which had been formed by Russian émigrés. As an employee of the Japanese Embassy in St Petersburg, he had already established contacts with Russian oppositionists, including the Finnish politician Konrad (Konni) Zilliacus in 1902.

    A member of the group posing as the wine merchant Robert Richard Dickenson bought the English steamer John Grafton, built in 1883. According to the testimony of the later Soviet diplomat Litvinov, arms were bought for 100 000 roubles and a plan was drawn up to ship them to several Finnish ports. Latvians Minka, Wagner, Strauss and Salniņš took part in the procurement of the weapons.
     

    https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graftona_avantūra

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @LatW, @LatW

    Another thing I wanted to share: here is a Lithuanian travel blogger who went to both North and South Korea and compared the two (he delves into the history a little, but just on the surface).

    He spent 7 days in North Korea (that’s all a foreign tourist is allowed to spend there) and that travelogue is somewhat positive (and non-ideological), however, later he posts another video where he discourages visiting N.Korea (because of the heavy toll that the stringent social and political regulations exact on the individual human being in North Korea and how the freedoms are impacted).

    And Seoul is truly amazing. He found a friend who had apparently escaped North Korea to South Korea. Not sure how objective this blogger is, there are good bits about both countries.

    [MORE]

    And there is a documentary about North Korea, “Under the Sun”, by a Russian director Vitaly Mansky (who bailed Putin’s Russia and has been living in Latvia for a long time now). It looks like some North Koreans didn’t like it, but when I watched it, it didn’t seem too bad to me, it showed that the living standards there are actually not bad (also it showed a lot of color, which is different because North Korean is typically portrayed as drab by Westerners). But one can see that it is a hyper-organized society.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_the_Sun_(2015_film)

  107. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Should hostilities once break out between Japan and the United States, it would not be enough that we take Guam and the Philippines, nor even Hawaii and San Francisco. To make victory certain, we would have to march into Washington and dictate the terms of peace in the White House. I wonder if our politicians [who speak so lightly of a Japanese-American war] have confidence as to the final outcome and are prepared to make the necessary sacrifices.
     
    Yamamoto

    Replies: @LatW

    The Japanese gardens on the West Coast are simply incredible. The one in Seattle is stunning. Everything is planted and maintained with such care and showing in complete splendor during the fall season. And the red maple is one of the most beautiful trees on the planet.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @LatW

    I have heard that everybody in Beverly Hills employs a Japanese gardener. I wonder if the new rich in Woodside have caught up. Judging by their outfits I am betting on 98% Mexicans.

    Replies: @LatW

    , @AP
    @LatW

    The one at the Chicago Botanical Garden is impressive

    https://live.staticflickr.com/3948/15581858036_cc9e069cfe_b.jpg

    Replies: @LatW

  108. Stunning and maintained with such care and showing complete splendor.

    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?
     
    Oh, yea? Gratitude for providing the train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.

    I choose myself who to show gratitude to and who to pay homage to. Nevertheless, I recognize that all humans have struggled. There is no justice in this cold and brutal world (and very little mercy).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  109. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The Japanese gardens on the West Coast are simply incredible. The one in Seattle is stunning. Everything is planted and maintained with such care and showing in complete splendor during the fall season. And the red maple is one of the most beautiful trees on the planet.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Seattle_Japanese_garden_2011_05.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AP

    I have heard that everybody in Beverly Hills employs a Japanese gardener. I wonder if the new rich in Woodside have caught up. Judging by their outfits I am betting on 98% Mexicans.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    I have heard that everybody in Beverly Hills employs a Japanese gardener.
     
    I don't blame them. :) Beverly Hills is in the south, but the Japanese are actually more "native" further north, they have lived there for a long time (logs from Japanese boats washed up on America's shores in ancient times) and their homes there are very distinct (it is not just the Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), a very decorative tree on its own, but also intricately cut small Japanese pines that have been planted near their homes). Those are their signature trees, absolutely gorgeous and very exotic looking.

    I'm not sure there are such original, older Japanese homes in Beverly Hills, however, I'm sure a Japanese gardener would do a great job landscaping a newly built property.


    Judging by their outfits I am betting on 98% Mexicans.
     
    Surely, Mexicans could try to learn to landscape like this and maybe even be partly successful sans the refinement which is in fact crucial (Balts would have a field day, since they are obsessed with horticulture yet they don't have the luxury of a mild Pacific climate - they could come close to imitating that, but not fully). Nothing beats the original touch.
  110. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @QCIC

    I think this is Fake News, but I'm interested in your opinion.



    https://twitter.com/alexbward/status/1734892249257738420

    Replies: @A123, @Emil Nikola Richard, @QCIC

    It sounds OK to me since the USA doesn’t have much say in what happens in North Korea. I don’t remember what Trump’s prior position is toward the DPRK.

    I assume North and South Korea will naturally reunite at some point. I suspect Trump would be for this if the cost is otherwise low. He might want to take some credit for peacemaking.

    As the SMO winds down Russia may naturally begin to support the DPRK much more strongly the way the Soviets did. Previously Russia was concerned about sanctions and now they no longer have to worry about this. A renewed strong bond between Russia and North Korea may gradually pressure South Korea and Japan to become more moderate with respect to Russia.

    I think Russia has a shared interest with reunited Korea and Japan being independent and strong and the three states mutually operating as a counter balance to China. For the moment Russia may actually approve of the Western heckling of China since it keeps her somewhat in check.

    Probably the best case scenario is that Russia helps North Korea build back up economically. The both can become more prosperous while retaining some “old school values” which the West has lost, including the rapidly declining South Korea. Once North Korea looks a bit stronger and a bit nicer reunification might be straightforward.

  111. If you read all the way to the end they have what Genocide Joe told his Bobo.

    It isn’t personal. &
    It’s where we are on the time line. &
    It is what it is. &
    We are trying to run a business.

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/12/12/politics/russia-troop-losses-us-intelligence-assessment/index.html

    Russia has lost 87% of troops it had prior to start of Ukraine war, according to US intelligence assessment

    Actually I did not read all the way to the end. : )

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    Russia has lost 87% of troops it had prior to start of Ukraine war, according to US intelligence assessment
     
    I like that number. It gives the game away. It is certainly as credible as the US intelligence claim before Iraq war that Saddam has WMDs.

    Apparently, the dead are now fighting and beating Ukrainian troops to pulp, like in the “The return of the king”.

    The best thing about current US powers-that-be is that they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves. Perfect self-service.

    Replies: @Beckow

  112. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @LatW

    I have heard that everybody in Beverly Hills employs a Japanese gardener. I wonder if the new rich in Woodside have caught up. Judging by their outfits I am betting on 98% Mexicans.

    Replies: @LatW

    I have heard that everybody in Beverly Hills employs a Japanese gardener.

    I don’t blame them. 🙂 Beverly Hills is in the south, but the Japanese are actually more “native” further north, they have lived there for a long time (logs from Japanese boats washed up on America’s shores in ancient times) and their homes there are very distinct (it is not just the Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), a very decorative tree on its own, but also intricately cut small Japanese pines that have been planted near their homes). Those are their signature trees, absolutely gorgeous and very exotic looking.

    I’m not sure there are such original, older Japanese homes in Beverly Hills, however, I’m sure a Japanese gardener would do a great job landscaping a newly built property.

    Judging by their outfits I am betting on 98% Mexicans.

    Surely, Mexicans could try to learn to landscape like this and maybe even be partly successful sans the refinement which is in fact crucial (Balts would have a field day, since they are obsessed with horticulture yet they don’t have the luxury of a mild Pacific climate – they could come close to imitating that, but not fully). Nothing beats the original touch.

  113. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    Stunning and maintained with such care and showing complete splendor.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/2018-10-31_15_25_21_The_west_side_of_the_Marine_Corps_War_Memorial_in_Arlington_County%2C_Virginia.jpg/853px-2018-10-31_15_25_21_The_west_side_of_the_Marine_Corps_War_Memorial_in_Arlington_County%2C_Virginia.jpg


    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?

    Replies: @LatW

    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?

    Oh, yea? Gratitude for providing the train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.

    I choose myself who to show gratitude to and who to pay homage to. Nevertheless, I recognize that all humans have struggled. There is no justice in this cold and brutal world (and very little mercy).

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    Yea, the Americans are your people, you ungrateful sod.


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/ohtani-signs-with-dodgers-for-700-million-for-10-years/#comment-6311875

    Replies: @LatW

    , @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.
     
    Bullshit, the Americans never did this, you talk alot of shit.

    Show some evidence! You can't because it only exist in your unhinged imagination!

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/2018-10-31_15_25_21_The_west_side_of_the_Marine_Corps_War_Memorial_in_Arlington_County%2C_Virginia.jpg/853px-2018-10-31_15_25_21_The_west_side_of_the_Marine_Corps_War_Memorial_in_Arlington_County%2C_Virginia.jpg

  114. @songbird
    @Mr. Hack


    A couple of soldiers got drunk and “raped” a woman during their night out on the town
     
    LMAO. Why are you putting it in quotation marks? IIRC there's been a couple of incidents, including these two with corpuses delicti:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-42192571


    But you're being overly reductive. There are many reasons not to want US troops around beyond these incidents (including if you are American), and I don't think it's the main motivation for many.

    Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.
     
    surely, a straw man. Many EEs probably want more US bases. Likely as do some of these these very small states, like Qatar or Djibouti.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I wasn’t sure what exactly the charges were and if they were indeed proven. I was going on my recollections, and didn’t have any time to research the issue. “Straw man” how so?

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. Hack


    “Straw man” how so?
     

    Well, you said this:

    Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

     

    All seems like a very high bar to clear. Nobody else said all.

    Iraq and Syria, which I already cited, are two clear-cut examples of countries where the current governments don't want US bases, but the US doesn't care.

    When Iraq’s parliament voted to expel American troops from the country Sunday, it was an apparent bid by the government to extract the country from an escalating US-Iran proxy war.
     
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/06/middleeast/iraq-us-troops-explainer-intl/index.html

    Support in a lot of other places is mixed, at best.

    Granted, there aren't insurgencies in most of these places driving US troops out, but that was also true of Soviet bases.
  115. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?
     
    Oh, yea? Gratitude for providing the train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.

    I choose myself who to show gratitude to and who to pay homage to. Nevertheless, I recognize that all humans have struggled. There is no justice in this cold and brutal world (and very little mercy).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    Yea, the Americans are your people,
     
    No, they're not.

    Wait, aren't you an ethnic Chinese parked somewhere in the US? Or even born there? Yet trashing the West all the time.

    Why so agitated? Happiness is hard to find?

    And, yea, some of the train cars they gave to Stalin, he used in his countless deportations. The Soviet Russians always had lousy infrastructure and even despite the brutal modernization, they did not have enough equipment. This is all well known.

    I would be much more grateful to the Americans that they provided food assistance during the Independence War, but that was much earlier (even though we should've been able to provide our own).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  116. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    The French gave them the boot and the Germans, Dutch, Norwegians, British, Italians, and Spaniards would give them the boot after 30 seconds of deliberation if the people had anything to say about it.

    Are you drunk?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Well, goes to show you that the US does not force countries to accept their bases, although I’m sure pressure and some dealing goes on behind the scenes, with those that acquiesce. I’m not aware of the situation in Spain…have their been demonstrations against the base there by the local population?

  117. Russia has to understand that the Ukraine war isn’t going to end, as-long as the West can drip feed the Ukrainian resistance they will do so rather than admit defeat.

    The U.S has changed tactics and Russia has to do the same. The U.S now look on Ukraine has a holding force…holding large numbers of Russian soldiers and equipment on a large front, now the U.S can concentrate on the middle-east and Iran.

    Russia has to push Ukraine back over the Dnipro river as quick as possible and set up a patrolled buffer zone, this will free up troops that can be kept in reserve for geo-strategic matters.

    War is a fluid concept, and this fluidity is about draining and exhausting your enemy, the U.S has not really entered the theater yet, and don’t believe the U.S don’t have a strong army…they can find plenty of good soldiers in 350 million people.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Mr_Chow_Mein

    The Russian military knows the West will drip feed the AFU and most likely they don't care. Russia is probably focussed on the post-SMO situation now.

    It would interesting to know what Russia is doing with newly produced armaments. Let's say they build 500 high performance tactical missiles next month. How many go to the SMO and how many to the rest of the Russian forces across the country? Of the ones for the SMO, how many are used right away and how many are kept for future combat?

    Ukie backers would say 100% go to the SMO where 90% are immediately shot down. I would guess 60% go to the SMO and 40% to stockpiles in the rest of Russia. Of the 60% maybe half are used as soon as possible. In other words the stockpile for SMO work may be increasing over time even while Russia is regularly launching strikes.

    So my guess is:

    30% are used right away of which 75% get through Ukrainian air defenses
    30% are stockpiled for the SMO
    40% are stockpiled in the rest of the Russian Federation.

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster. If the Ukrainians have already press-ganged men and boys on the streets and accepted female combat troops how much longer can they really go on? On the other hand Russia gets more seasoned combat vets with hard winter experience. They can use this this now that Finland has joined NATO and other Northern countries have become more polarized against Russia.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  118. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    Have you had a chance to visit and show your gratitude?
     
    Oh, yea? Gratitude for providing the train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.

    I choose myself who to show gratitude to and who to pay homage to. Nevertheless, I recognize that all humans have struggled. There is no justice in this cold and brutal world (and very little mercy).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    train cars for the deportation of my people? Including children.

    Bullshit, the Americans never did this, you talk alot of shit.

    Show some evidence! You can’t because it only exist in your unhinged imagination!

  119. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    Yea, the Americans are your people, you ungrateful sod.


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/ohtani-signs-with-dodgers-for-700-million-for-10-years/#comment-6311875

    Replies: @LatW

    Yea, the Americans are your people,

    No, they’re not.

    Wait, aren’t you an ethnic Chinese parked somewhere in the US? Or even born there? Yet trashing the West all the time.

    Why so agitated? Happiness is hard to find?

    And, yea, some of the train cars they gave to Stalin, he used in his countless deportations. The Soviet Russians always had lousy infrastructure and even despite the brutal modernization, they did not have enough equipment. This is all well known.

    I would be much more grateful to the Americans that they provided food assistance during the Independence War, but that was much earlier (even though we should’ve been able to provide our own).

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    Why do you insist I live in America? Just because you live there?

    So I must too?

    You really are unhinged.

    Replies: @LatW

  120. Rural Russians are the biggest saps:

    This is exactly what happened with Stalin.

    The people assumed the complaints weren’t getting to him. If only Stalin knew!!!!

    Your Tsar knows and he doesn’t care. DERRRRR

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @John Johnson

    This kind of stuff helps to explain why Putler is causing wars in neighboring countries, in order to to deflect scrutiny exposing the endemic rot within Russia. Of course those that have fled Russia and have managed to to comfortably blend in somewhere in the West, can sit around and bellyache over the time constraints of Minsk 2 agreements, but what of those left behind? They don't really give a s__t.

  121. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    Yea, the Americans are your people,
     
    No, they're not.

    Wait, aren't you an ethnic Chinese parked somewhere in the US? Or even born there? Yet trashing the West all the time.

    Why so agitated? Happiness is hard to find?

    And, yea, some of the train cars they gave to Stalin, he used in his countless deportations. The Soviet Russians always had lousy infrastructure and even despite the brutal modernization, they did not have enough equipment. This is all well known.

    I would be much more grateful to the Americans that they provided food assistance during the Independence War, but that was much earlier (even though we should've been able to provide our own).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Why do you insist I live in America? Just because you live there?

    So I must too?

    You really are unhinged.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago, was that in China?

    Well, I might be wrong, but you do sound like someone who is parked somewhere in the West. You don't really sound like an original Chinese, but I might be wrong, ofc. What is the truth (maybe better to speak the truth instead of calling names?). No, seriously, why so angry, the world is not how you wish it should be and you can't bend it to your mind? The "multi-polar world" didn't really work out the way it was hoped or something? I at least accept that different people in the world have different interests.

    I offered you yesterday to calm down and not have enmity or agitate each other, yet you choose to continue to be needlessly hostile. Why?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  122. @AP
    @Beckow


    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.
     
    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you
     
    I asked you for evidence that a significant portion of the $40 billion in cash assistance was stolen.

    You provided none.

    You want a number? Well, 1% would be significant. Any evidence of $400 million having been stolen? Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft, surely it would be easy to find evidence of that.

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how
     
    How many do you think Russia has lost since the invasion started in February 2022?

    Or is it 10k as you once claimed?

     

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war (unless I mentioned such a number in early 2022, don’t recall).

    but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991
     
    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @Beckow

    The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    “Russia never forgives friendship with her,” says Ayder Muzhdabayev (a Crimean (Krimchak) critic of the Kremlin).

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    No, they’re not.
     
    If you tell me how many decades ago you moved to America.

    I'll tell you what year I moved to Singapore. Here's a hint it was a long time ago and not from America.

    Is that a deal?

    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?

    Replies: @LatW

    , @AnonfromTN
    @LatW

    To be an enemy of America can be dangerous, but to be a friend is fatal.
    Henry Kissinger

    He knew what he was talking about.

  123. @Emil Nikola Richard
    If you read all the way to the end they have what Genocide Joe told his Bobo.

    It isn't personal. &
    It's where we are on the time line. &
    It is what it is. &
    We are trying to run a business.

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/12/12/politics/russia-troop-losses-us-intelligence-assessment/index.html

    Russia has lost 87% of troops it had prior to start of Ukraine war, according to US intelligence assessment

    Actually I did not read all the way to the end. : )

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    Russia has lost 87% of troops it had prior to start of Ukraine war, according to US intelligence assessment

    I like that number. It gives the game away. It is certainly as credible as the US intelligence claim before Iraq war that Saddam has WMDs.

    Apparently, the dead are now fighting and beating Ukrainian troops to pulp, like in the “The return of the king”.

    The best thing about current US powers-that-be is that they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves. Perfect self-service.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AnonfromTN


    ...they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves.
     
    It is even worse: they believe that wars are won by PR deceptions. Thy think that if they win in the media (Western house media) that's all that matters. It is a meta-war: a "war about the war" in front of the public - and themselves. It is closer to self-therapy than to geo-politics.

    The claim of 87% is of course intentionally stupid - not meant to be believed, it is a spit at the enemy as the war is being lost. Germans did very much the same thing in the last year of the war. The actual number of casualties given that Russia had in early 2022 700k active troops - plus the Donbas and other militias like Chechens - would by over 600k....riiiiight, that had to be quite a meeting as they settled on the "number"...I see a few elderly women staring at PowerPoint slides...

    This is very sad, even tragic, but let's also appreciate the entertainment value that is just precious, it cut sthrough the brain-dead Western culture like a lightning...I am hoping they grab it and make something out of it. But probably not...

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  124. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    Why do you insist I live in America? Just because you live there?

    So I must too?

    You really are unhinged.

    Replies: @LatW

    [MORE]

    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago, was that in China?

    Well, I might be wrong, but you do sound like someone who is parked somewhere in the West. You don’t really sound like an original Chinese, but I might be wrong, ofc. What is the truth (maybe better to speak the truth instead of calling names?). No, seriously, why so angry, the world is not how you wish it should be and you can’t bend it to your mind? The “multi-polar world” didn’t really work out the way it was hoped or something? I at least accept that different people in the world have different interests.

    I offered you yesterday to calm down and not have enmity or agitate each other, yet you choose to continue to be needlessly hostile. Why?

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-237/#comment-6311925

    LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE.

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-226/#comment-6118914

    These are not their real names.

    , @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago,
     
    Please clarify for the audience what you mean by this.

    Many people will get the wrong idea.

    She was not a Westerner nor was she Chinese.
  125. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    The Japanese gardens on the West Coast are simply incredible. The one in Seattle is stunning. Everything is planted and maintained with such care and showing in complete splendor during the fall season. And the red maple is one of the most beautiful trees on the planet.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Seattle_Japanese_garden_2011_05.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AP

    The one at the Chicago Botanical Garden is impressive

    • Replies: @LatW
    @AP

    Such beauty and such great combinations of colors and shapes. But it looks almost too tidy, too perfect, almost like divine creation or something crafted by timeless evolution, while it is just a caring human hand, almost as if caressing the landscape. One can see though, with the trees in the background, that it is a different climate than the Pacific, one can see those trees are from much colder climes. It is a bit more rugged.

  126. @LatW
    @AP


    The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.
     
    "Russia never forgives friendship with her," says Ayder Muzhdabayev (a Crimean (Krimchak) critic of the Kremlin).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @AnonfromTN

    No, they’re not.

    If you tell me how many decades ago you moved to America.

    I’ll tell you what year I moved to Singapore. Here’s a hint it was a long time ago and not from America.

    Is that a deal?

    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?
     
    I could always claim to be "part Uralic". You should be able to get the joke. I wonder if I could claim that somewhere for some potential goodies or preferences. It might work these days. (Jk.)

    Is that a deal?
     
    I have another suggestion - let's cut down on unneeded animosity. I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it's fun, but it can be a waste of time. And why spread negative, toxic vibes in an already complicated world?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  127. Why are Koreans so obsessed with these boy bands and girl bands? K-Pop is sickeningly cheesy, ultra commercialised crap and the singers are completely owned and controlled by the management companies, there isn’t even a pretense of artistic individuality.

    Western music is bad enough, but I just can’t even begin to understand the mentality of a people and culture who lap that K-Pop garbage up

    K-Pop strikes me as being “culture” for people who absolutely despise individuality and anything even vaguely “grass roots” and want to crush it.

  128. @Mr_Chow_Mein
    Russia has to understand that the Ukraine war isn't going to end, as-long as the West can drip feed the Ukrainian resistance they will do so rather than admit defeat.

    The U.S has changed tactics and Russia has to do the same. The U.S now look on Ukraine has a holding force...holding large numbers of Russian soldiers and equipment on a large front, now the U.S can concentrate on the middle-east and Iran.

    Russia has to push Ukraine back over the Dnipro river as quick as possible and set up a patrolled buffer zone, this will free up troops that can be kept in reserve for geo-strategic matters.

    War is a fluid concept, and this fluidity is about draining and exhausting your enemy, the U.S has not really entered the theater yet, and don't believe the U.S don't have a strong army...they can find plenty of good soldiers in 350 million people.

    Replies: @QCIC

    The Russian military knows the West will drip feed the AFU and most likely they don’t care. Russia is probably focussed on the post-SMO situation now.

    It would interesting to know what Russia is doing with newly produced armaments. Let’s say they build 500 high performance tactical missiles next month. How many go to the SMO and how many to the rest of the Russian forces across the country? Of the ones for the SMO, how many are used right away and how many are kept for future combat?

    Ukie backers would say 100% go to the SMO where 90% are immediately shot down. I would guess 60% go to the SMO and 40% to stockpiles in the rest of Russia. Of the 60% maybe half are used as soon as possible. In other words the stockpile for SMO work may be increasing over time even while Russia is regularly launching strikes.

    So my guess is:

    30% are used right away of which 75% get through Ukrainian air defenses
    30% are stockpiled for the SMO
    40% are stockpiled in the rest of the Russian Federation.

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster. If the Ukrainians have already press-ganged men and boys on the streets and accepted female combat troops how much longer can they really go on? On the other hand Russia gets more seasoned combat vets with hard winter experience. They can use this this now that Finland has joined NATO and other Northern countries have become more polarized against Russia.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster.

    I guess you haven't been reading the news.

    They have been throwing waves of men and armor at Avdiivka.

    Putin is most likely trying to get a symbolic victory before the winter sets in.

    Which means he isn't on your imagined timeline. A Russian will explain the situation to you:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0uQqivncAc

    It's a great day to die for an angry dwarf who most likely has a micropenis.

    Replies: @QCIC

  129. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    No, they’re not.
     
    If you tell me how many decades ago you moved to America.

    I'll tell you what year I moved to Singapore. Here's a hint it was a long time ago and not from America.

    Is that a deal?

    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?

    Replies: @LatW

    [MORE]

    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?

    I could always claim to be “part Uralic”. You should be able to get the joke. I wonder if I could claim that somewhere for some potential goodies or preferences. It might work these days. (Jk.)

    Is that a deal?

    I have another suggestion – let’s cut down on unneeded animosity. I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it’s fun, but it can be a waste of time. And why spread negative, toxic vibes in an already complicated world?

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it’s fun,
     
    I don't have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.

    You've got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.

    Replies: @LatW

  130. @LatW
    @AP


    The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.
     
    "Russia never forgives friendship with her," says Ayder Muzhdabayev (a Crimean (Krimchak) critic of the Kremlin).

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @AnonfromTN

    To be an enemy of America can be dangerous, but to be a friend is fatal.
    Henry Kissinger

    He knew what he was talking about.

  131. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago, was that in China?

    Well, I might be wrong, but you do sound like someone who is parked somewhere in the West. You don't really sound like an original Chinese, but I might be wrong, ofc. What is the truth (maybe better to speak the truth instead of calling names?). No, seriously, why so angry, the world is not how you wish it should be and you can't bend it to your mind? The "multi-polar world" didn't really work out the way it was hoped or something? I at least accept that different people in the world have different interests.

    I offered you yesterday to calm down and not have enmity or agitate each other, yet you choose to continue to be needlessly hostile. Why?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  132. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    And you can cut the any bullshit about me not being a “Native Singaporean”, are you a “Native American”?
     
    I could always claim to be "part Uralic". You should be able to get the joke. I wonder if I could claim that somewhere for some potential goodies or preferences. It might work these days. (Jk.)

    Is that a deal?
     
    I have another suggestion - let's cut down on unneeded animosity. I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it's fun, but it can be a waste of time. And why spread negative, toxic vibes in an already complicated world?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it’s fun,

    I don’t have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.

    You’ve got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    I don’t have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.
     
    Hmm, ok, if you see it that way. I only inserted myself to defend the Bear-Slayer. :)

    You’ve got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)
     
    LOL. I can state my mind, maybe too much sometimes. He's just more mellow and conflict avoidant (the opposite of you, lol). I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.
     
    I have. I read about it a long time ago (and I saw a picture of a young woman holding her infant that left a mark on me). I never said they were not extremely cruel at times. I even watched a movie about it. It was crazy and very difficult to watch.

    I know that the people further East had it harder, Ukrainians too had it harder than the Baltic people. Various Asian peoples have had it hard through periods of colonization. But we had a dual Russo-German yoke for a long time.

    As to the Russians, they were quite aggressive in that area (it is understandable, as they wanted access to the water), however, they were pushing hard, the Japanese had reasons to feel uncomfortable, they had pushed hard through Asia very fast, colonizing, even if they were underdeveloped. They spread out but they don't go into depth properly. And Baltic people being present in that war, and dying, was a waste of our human capital (not to mention unethical), even though it was a hardening experience that later proved useful.


    Please clarify for the audience what you mean by this.
     
    You wrote that out of the blue, I thought you were talking about a Western woman. I must've been mistaken.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

  133. @AP
    @LatW

    The one at the Chicago Botanical Garden is impressive

    https://live.staticflickr.com/3948/15581858036_cc9e069cfe_b.jpg

    Replies: @LatW

    Such beauty and such great combinations of colors and shapes. But it looks almost too tidy, too perfect, almost like divine creation or something crafted by timeless evolution, while it is just a caring human hand, almost as if caressing the landscape. One can see though, with the trees in the background, that it is a different climate than the Pacific, one can see those trees are from much colder climes. It is a bit more rugged.

  134. @QCIC
    @Mr_Chow_Mein

    The Russian military knows the West will drip feed the AFU and most likely they don't care. Russia is probably focussed on the post-SMO situation now.

    It would interesting to know what Russia is doing with newly produced armaments. Let's say they build 500 high performance tactical missiles next month. How many go to the SMO and how many to the rest of the Russian forces across the country? Of the ones for the SMO, how many are used right away and how many are kept for future combat?

    Ukie backers would say 100% go to the SMO where 90% are immediately shot down. I would guess 60% go to the SMO and 40% to stockpiles in the rest of Russia. Of the 60% maybe half are used as soon as possible. In other words the stockpile for SMO work may be increasing over time even while Russia is regularly launching strikes.

    So my guess is:

    30% are used right away of which 75% get through Ukrainian air defenses
    30% are stockpiled for the SMO
    40% are stockpiled in the rest of the Russian Federation.

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster. If the Ukrainians have already press-ganged men and boys on the streets and accepted female combat troops how much longer can they really go on? On the other hand Russia gets more seasoned combat vets with hard winter experience. They can use this this now that Finland has joined NATO and other Northern countries have become more polarized against Russia.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster.

    I guess you haven’t been reading the news.

    They have been throwing waves of men and armor at Avdiivka.

    Putin is most likely trying to get a symbolic victory before the winter sets in.

    Which means he isn’t on your imagined timeline. A Russian will explain the situation to you:

    It’s a great day to die for an angry dwarf who most likely has a micropenis.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any? We will probably find out some of the truth eventually. In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    As therapy, you may want to try the following. There are a couple of big winners in here (0:30, 1:47, 4:30) mixed in with some meh.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CvDQYzoS3g

    Replies: @John Johnson

  135. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago, was that in China?

    Well, I might be wrong, but you do sound like someone who is parked somewhere in the West. You don't really sound like an original Chinese, but I might be wrong, ofc. What is the truth (maybe better to speak the truth instead of calling names?). No, seriously, why so angry, the world is not how you wish it should be and you can't bend it to your mind? The "multi-polar world" didn't really work out the way it was hoped or something? I at least accept that different people in the world have different interests.

    I offered you yesterday to calm down and not have enmity or agitate each other, yet you choose to continue to be needlessly hostile. Why?

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere, @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I thought you mentioned once that you had had an encounter with some Western woman at your work, years ago,

    Please clarify for the audience what you mean by this.

    Many people will get the wrong idea.

    She was not a Westerner nor was she Chinese.

  136. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I can spar, if I have to, and if I feel like it’s fun,
     
    I don't have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.

    You've got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.

    Replies: @LatW

    [MORE]

    I don’t have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.

    Hmm, ok, if you see it that way. I only inserted myself to defend the Bear-Slayer. 🙂

    You’ve got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)

    LOL. I can state my mind, maybe too much sometimes. He’s just more mellow and conflict avoidant (the opposite of you, lol). I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.

    I have. I read about it a long time ago (and I saw a picture of a young woman holding her infant that left a mark on me). I never said they were not extremely cruel at times. I even watched a movie about it. It was crazy and very difficult to watch.

    I know that the people further East had it harder, Ukrainians too had it harder than the Baltic people. Various Asian peoples have had it hard through periods of colonization. But we had a dual Russo-German yoke for a long time.

    As to the Russians, they were quite aggressive in that area (it is understandable, as they wanted access to the water), however, they were pushing hard, the Japanese had reasons to feel uncomfortable, they had pushed hard through Asia very fast, colonizing, even if they were underdeveloped. They spread out but they don’t go into depth properly. And Baltic people being present in that war, and dying, was a waste of our human capital (not to mention unethical), even though it was a hardening experience that later proved useful.

    Please clarify for the audience what you mean by this.

    You wrote that out of the blue, I thought you were talking about a Western woman. I must’ve been mistaken.

    • Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.
     
    Yeah and your one of the Russophobe Vecticībnieki. 😄

    Replies: @LatW, @Gerard1234

  137. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Why does Russia need to go fast in Ukraine? If they keep going at a medium level through the winter, Ukrainian morale will begin to slip faster.

    I guess you haven't been reading the news.

    They have been throwing waves of men and armor at Avdiivka.

    Putin is most likely trying to get a symbolic victory before the winter sets in.

    Which means he isn't on your imagined timeline. A Russian will explain the situation to you:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0uQqivncAc

    It's a great day to die for an angry dwarf who most likely has a micropenis.

    Replies: @QCIC

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any? We will probably find out some of the truth eventually. In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    As therapy, you may want to try the following. There are a couple of big winners in here (0:30, 1:47, 4:30) mixed in with some meh.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any?

    I don't see any contradictory information. International media sources have reported that Russia has been throwing armored columns at Adiivka. Videos from Russians appear to confirm heavy losses and meat wave type attacks. There are drone videos from Ukraine showing graveyards of APCs.

    In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Are you suggesting that they are not trying to take Avdiivka?

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    I don't see how. I've always assumed he has a very small penis.

    It takes a very special level of insecurity to be the world's richest man and in charge of the world's largest country and yet engage in ego fulfilling behavior where other people have to die.

    As for your video I didn't find it funny at all. Kind of reminded me of 21 jumpstreet with the corny and denigrating take on police work but without the occasional laugh. On an interesting side note that was the movie that made Kanye like Jews again. Poor Anglin had a magic negro crush on Kanye for ranting about the Jews but that movie put an end to it.

    Kanye decides that he likes Jews again after watching 21 Jumpstreet:
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/kanye-west-jonah-hill-21-jump-street-jewish-people-1234703761/

    Replies: @QCIC

  138. @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere


    I don’t have a problem with you inserting yourself into discussion Bromance and I are having. It adds spice.
     
    Hmm, ok, if you see it that way. I only inserted myself to defend the Bear-Slayer. :)

    You’ve got bigger balls than he has. (Jk.)
     
    LOL. I can state my mind, maybe too much sometimes. He's just more mellow and conflict avoidant (the opposite of you, lol). I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.

    If you want to learn what real cruelty and depravity is read up on what his people did to mine, your people had it easier in comparison.
     
    I have. I read about it a long time ago (and I saw a picture of a young woman holding her infant that left a mark on me). I never said they were not extremely cruel at times. I even watched a movie about it. It was crazy and very difficult to watch.

    I know that the people further East had it harder, Ukrainians too had it harder than the Baltic people. Various Asian peoples have had it hard through periods of colonization. But we had a dual Russo-German yoke for a long time.

    As to the Russians, they were quite aggressive in that area (it is understandable, as they wanted access to the water), however, they were pushing hard, the Japanese had reasons to feel uncomfortable, they had pushed hard through Asia very fast, colonizing, even if they were underdeveloped. They spread out but they don't go into depth properly. And Baltic people being present in that war, and dying, was a waste of our human capital (not to mention unethical), even though it was a hardening experience that later proved useful.


    Please clarify for the audience what you mean by this.
     
    You wrote that out of the blue, I thought you were talking about a Western woman. I must've been mistaken.

    Replies: @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.

    Yeah and your one of the Russophobe Vecticībnieki. 😄

    • LOL: LatW
    • Replies: @LatW
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere



    Haha. You are intelligent and have a fast mind, I'll give you that.

    , @Gerard1234
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Just to repeat my reply from the previous thread you may have missed :


    Yea, Riga does count very much – since Riga was mostly built by Germans and Latvians. They did not have a substantial presence compared to Latvians. Do not ever bring up Riga again in these conversations.

     

    Wow, I could not let this garbage written to Beckow pass.
    This is ridiculous….the first Riga architect that enters anyones head immediately is Eisenstein you idiot. Technically Jewish, but more than classifies enough to be considered a Russian architect. Then second name is Antonov – with him and Eisenstein the quality and quantity of their buildings around Riga is what makes them the primary ones anybody thinks of. Then after that its several excellent german architects, Swedes,Jews and many more Russian architects and engineers. Only AFTER that list do we get to minuscule number of Latvians “building” Riga you retarded idiot. Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg. How can trash like you lie so much?

    Outside of Old Riga (which still has several buildings designed by Russian architects, and of course zero by Latvian ones) – what wasn’t designed by Russians …..was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money, and ALL these were project managed by Russians , on orders of RUSSIANS so that these structures suit RUSSIAN tastes and interests you serial dumbfuck.

    I just can’t believe how much of a lying POS you have to be to write that nonsense to Beckow.
    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians. There is the Cultural Palace, I think the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built, the massive bandstand at Mezhapark entirely Soviet/Russian project you imbecile in the architecture and the ethos of it ( travelling in Europe I haven’t seen a bandstand close to the size or style). MinNauk building is basically like one of the Seven sisters and, again, impossible to miss as the tallest building in Riga. The old stock exchange. The Ridzene hotel a typical soviet beauty ( and I think the top 3 hotels that I know of there are Russian built)

    Then of course there is the Gorky bridge (and ANY bridge over the Daugava you dipshit), and EVERY bit of big public infrastructure that exists in Riga providing the water, heat, taking the sewage away of anybody living in Riga, road – EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.

    Whole neighbourhoods of the Riga conurbation built by the Soviets/Russians. Several well-known mansions from Tsarists times designed by Russians around Riga.

    Then I clearly remember visiting (as its at the most directly opposite the lovely (German) Riga Cathedral)……….the lovely Russia insurance society building which is definitely Russian-made, with joined to it the Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect. So in arguably the focal point of the city, the country – the Dom square the biggest and most relaxed square in the city, with the prestigious and beautiful German cathedral…….and directly opposite it around the square are definitely 1 , probably 2 large Russian buildings. Nowhere is there anything Latvian ( except for the retard red/brown – white flags LOL)

    Masses of Old Believers and Russian merchants found there way into Riga pre and early Tsarist era. ROC churches are a HUGE part of Riga you dickhead (certainly for the tourists). Its impossible to imagine Riga without these masterpiece churches, impossible to imagine Riga WITH “latvian” churches. There is the historic Moscow Forshstadt area ( where the MinNauk building is) and going through Riga I remember you can still see several wooden clad buildings………which means RUSSIAN (either Old Believers or Merchants) houses as the others would have the brick or stone exterior buildings. In none of this , is there such a thing as “Latvian” architecture you worthless, lying , pathetic scumbag.

    So key, historic landmarks, key and extensive infrastructure covering the public, cultural, education, finance sectors…. the entire city owing its existence to Russian people and Russian money , LMAO.

    That’s also not even taking into consideration the pre-Tsarist German and Swedish buildings destroyed during WW2 and rebuilt to a wonderful standard by the Soviets ……..or those masterful Tsarist Russian buildings that the Soviets removed, or the some of the masterful Stalinist-era buildings Khrushchev-era removed.

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW

  139. @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any? We will probably find out some of the truth eventually. In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    As therapy, you may want to try the following. There are a couple of big winners in here (0:30, 1:47, 4:30) mixed in with some meh.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CvDQYzoS3g

    Replies: @John Johnson

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any?

    I don’t see any contradictory information. International media sources have reported that Russia has been throwing armored columns at Adiivka. Videos from Russians appear to confirm heavy losses and meat wave type attacks. There are drone videos from Ukraine showing graveyards of APCs.

    In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Are you suggesting that they are not trying to take Avdiivka?

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    I don’t see how. I’ve always assumed he has a very small penis.

    It takes a very special level of insecurity to be the world’s richest man and in charge of the world’s largest country and yet engage in ego fulfilling behavior where other people have to die.

    As for your video I didn’t find it funny at all. Kind of reminded me of 21 jumpstreet with the corny and denigrating take on police work but without the occasional laugh. On an interesting side note that was the movie that made Kanye like Jews again. Poor Anglin had a magic negro crush on Kanye for ranting about the Jews but that movie put an end to it.

    Kanye decides that he likes Jews again after watching 21 Jumpstreet:
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/kanye-west-jonah-hill-21-jump-street-jewish-people-1234703761/

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I don't keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last "map" video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses. Then we have a ridiculous report from Uncle Sammy on the overall Russian losses. I would like to check the wording to see if the misrepresentation is bad as it seems.

    The best line in the video is where he has to rip through all the dishonest woke language and say "...do they have a hole or a pole"? That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people's ideological blinders on this topic. The bit with "We've zapped three of them today, they're everywhere this morning" is tragicomedy. This is tragedy because the destruction of reasonable polite society is what makes tyranny more likely. It is comedy in the "it is better to laugh that to cry" category. The stupid cops are foils that could be good or bad depending on the situation, but will always use force. The video has other stupid stuff and f-bombs I didn't like, but the sections I listed are great.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Wokechoke

  140. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.
     
    Yeah and your one of the Russophobe Vecticībnieki. 😄

    Replies: @LatW, @Gerard1234

    [MORE]

    Haha. You are intelligent and have a fast mind, I’ll give you that.

  141. Ukraine was never going to win – US senator
    https://www.rt.com/news/588986-ukraine-never-win-senator/

    Tommy Tuberville has also dismissed the notion that Russia could invade EU states as just a “selling point”

    —————————–

    Zelensky Presses the Flesh for $ in DC, Lloyd Austin Threatens to Send Families of Republican Congressmen & Senators to Fight Russia, Trump Doesn’t Like Ukraine, US Semiconductor Sanctions Fail, more.
    https://marksleboda.substack.com/p/zelensky-presses-the-flesh-for-in?utm_source=profile&utm_medium=reader2

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Mikhail

    Is there video of Austin making the threatening comments, even if couched in political rhetoric? Sounds like potential grounds for immediate firing. When is this mentioned in the interview?

  142. @AnonfromTN
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    Russia has lost 87% of troops it had prior to start of Ukraine war, according to US intelligence assessment
     
    I like that number. It gives the game away. It is certainly as credible as the US intelligence claim before Iraq war that Saddam has WMDs.

    Apparently, the dead are now fighting and beating Ukrainian troops to pulp, like in the “The return of the king”.

    The best thing about current US powers-that-be is that they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves. Perfect self-service.

    Replies: @Beckow

    …they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves.

    It is even worse: they believe that wars are won by PR deceptions. Thy think that if they win in the media (Western house media) that’s all that matters. It is a meta-war: a “war about the war” in front of the public – and themselves. It is closer to self-therapy than to geo-politics.

    The claim of 87% is of course intentionally stupid – not meant to be believed, it is a spit at the enemy as the war is being lost. Germans did very much the same thing in the last year of the war. The actual number of casualties given that Russia had in early 2022 700k active troops – plus the Donbas and other militias like Chechens – would by over 600k….riiiiight, that had to be quite a meeting as they settled on the “number”…I see a few elderly women staring at PowerPoint slides…

    This is very sad, even tragic, but let’s also appreciate the entertainment value that is just precious, it cut sthrough the brain-dead Western culture like a lightning…I am hoping they grab it and make something out of it. But probably not…

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Beckow

    https://flowofwisdom.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/mindwar-mindwar_co_authored_by_michael-aquino.pdf

    This is obsolete and replaced by his book.

    https://www.amazon.com/MindWar-Michael-Aquino-Ph-D/dp/1535199563

    They are not only making war on the Russians. They are making war on everybody. No way can it continue forever but it has been going on for a very long time if you ask me. The book is excellent. He leaves out a lot, but what is in there is pretty reliable. I heard an interview with him shortly before he died which might have been his last public interview. He said nine eleven was a controlled demolition job which was obvious to all on the day it happened.

    Replies: @QCIC

  143. @Mr. Hack
    @A123


    However, McConnell’s open capitulation is a huge step forward towards re-establishing America’s national prestige and honour.
     
    What national prestige and honor? From propping up Ukraine and being its largest supporter to doing an abrupt about face and letting it flounder to the financial might of the greatest gas station in the world? The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world. It will equally look like a cowardly nation not worth the ink that it signs in any future agreements, think Budapest Memorandum.

    2-3 months of closer deliberations in the congress should result in a clearer path of Ukrainian support. It aint over till the fat lady sings!

    Replies: @Derer, @Mikel

    The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world.

    All things considered, I consider the US to be the greatest country in the world but other than Israel and perhaps South Korea, I don’t know who else may consider it today to be a very reliable ally.

    If your independence depends on the US continuing to support you indefinitely, you can’t really say that you are an independent country. Apart from the possibility of American internal politics leading to the US doing a Kabul or a Saigon on you, your own internal politics are going to be scrutinized so that you comply with US norms that may not be part of your culture at all. I would certainly hate my country to be a Russian puppet. Just look at repressive and impoverished Belarus. But I don’t think the Russians care about shoving any particular ideology down anybody’s throat these days as much as the American Establishment does. Being such a great country inevitably led the US to become a superpower but sadly, that meant abandoning the non-interventionist spirit of earlier times.

    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US. Regardless of my thoughts about the tragedy that started in 2014, the Ukrainian military has shown a great deal of competence while the Russians have proven to be weaker and less competent than anybody thought. However, at the end of the day Russia continues to be a huge country with vast human and material resources and capable of fielding many advanced lethal weapons. Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war. Starting by not killing so many of their civilian co-ethnics, as I’ll never tire to repeat.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Mikel


    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US.
     
    What makes you think they don't?

    Replies: @Mikel

    , @Beckow
    @Mikel


    ...Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war.
     
    Nice sentiment, but it assumes that there were not people who wanted the war - not everybody wanted to avoid it. There were Ukies who out of stupidity or because they are fanatics thought that they can only achieve their objectives by a war - Zelko&Co. at least initially were not among them, but now they are.

    The destroy-Russia Nato-uber-alles neo-cons also wanted a war - there was no other way to get what they want: Crimea and to surround Russia militarily so they can try to dismantle it next time it goes through an internal crisis. And Russian security-types who thought that a war now is preferable to waiting until Nato-Ukraine are fully settled.

    The three forces now have a war. As always most of them are not suffering from it at all, they are safely in the back cheering it on...but this was a wanted war and a very much anticipated war.
  144. @AnonfromTN
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    the first big headline after Millei’s election was him pledging allegiance to Israel.
     
    Israel is busily digging its grave. What’s more, Israeli crimes in Gaza damaged the US even more than Israel itself (nobody expected anything good from Israel, anyway). So, if that certifiable mental case wants Argentina to go down with Israel, good luck to him. Except for vulture funds, Argentina is no more important for the world than Kabo Verde or Tuvalu.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Re: https://www.eurasiareview.com/12122023-ukraines-future-oped/

    From a gentle Jewish socialist –

    As for answering your question, which I think is at least a bit rhetorical,
    what else could Putin have done?
    Just about anything except starting an invasion,
    just as Hamas could have done other things besides a pogrom.
    Both those actions must not go unanswered.

    My reply –

    Just as Israel could’ve done other things besides a bigger pogrom than what Hamas did? There’s also the history prior to this past 10/7. As for claims of double standards, Russia has been the party being held to the greater double standard. The banning of the Russian flag and anthem from the upcoming Olympics (being done presently in numerous sports) is sheer bigotry.

    Russia gave peace a seven years chance (regarding the Minsk Accords) as the Kiev regime revamped its arsenal and increased attacks on Donbass.

  145. @Mikel
    @Mr. Hack


    The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world.
     
    All things considered, I consider the US to be the greatest country in the world but other than Israel and perhaps South Korea, I don't know who else may consider it today to be a very reliable ally.

    If your independence depends on the US continuing to support you indefinitely, you can't really say that you are an independent country. Apart from the possibility of American internal politics leading to the US doing a Kabul or a Saigon on you, your own internal politics are going to be scrutinized so that you comply with US norms that may not be part of your culture at all. I would certainly hate my country to be a Russian puppet. Just look at repressive and impoverished Belarus. But I don't think the Russians care about shoving any particular ideology down anybody's throat these days as much as the American Establishment does. Being such a great country inevitably led the US to become a superpower but sadly, that meant abandoning the non-interventionist spirit of earlier times.

    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US. Regardless of my thoughts about the tragedy that started in 2014, the Ukrainian military has shown a great deal of competence while the Russians have proven to be weaker and less competent than anybody thought. However, at the end of the day Russia continues to be a huge country with vast human and material resources and capable of fielding many advanced lethal weapons. Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war. Starting by not killing so many of their civilian co-ethnics, as I'll never tire to repeat.

    Replies: @LatW, @Beckow

    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US.

    What makes you think they don’t?

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @LatW


    What makes you think they don’t?
     
    I'm pretty sure they do now. But I'm not sure what the thinking was a year and a half ago. Arestovich's revelations suggest that at least the political leadership felt too secure about the West's commitment and many thousands died and will continue to die for no larger gains than could have been achieved through negotiations then.

    Replies: @LatW

  146. The latest Fink-Dersh debate:

  147. @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    I wasn't sure what exactly the charges were and if they were indeed proven. I was going on my recollections, and didn't have any time to research the issue. "Straw man" how so?

    Replies: @songbird

    “Straw man” how so?

    [MORE]

    Well, you said this:

    Not exactly the image of a belligerent country that all host countries want to remove.

    All seems like a very high bar to clear. Nobody else said all.

    Iraq and Syria, which I already cited, are two clear-cut examples of countries where the current governments don’t want US bases, but the US doesn’t care.

    When Iraq’s parliament voted to expel American troops from the country Sunday, it was an apparent bid by the government to extract the country from an escalating US-Iran proxy war.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/06/middleeast/iraq-us-troops-explainer-intl/index.html

    Support in a lot of other places is mixed, at best.

    Granted, there aren’t insurgencies in most of these places driving US troops out, but that was also true of Soviet bases.

  148. @A123
    @AP

    I accept your apology.

    Thank you for retracting your attempt to revise my original accurate statement. Your admission that my original intent was obvious, clear, and accurate is appreciated.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

    I accept your apology.

    I also accept AP’s apology to you. One needs to be magnanimous always.

    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP’s idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all. This is a line that he’s kept repeating for months now so there is no hope that he’ll abandon it. He’d rather spend sleepless nights defending it post after post with a hundred graphs. But it doesn’t make any sense. On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed. Impossible to believe.

    On the other hand, it doesn’t even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt (as long as demand for the gargantuan US debt continues to exist), the interests of which we also have to pay with our taxes. In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog but we should feel grateful about it lol.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mikel


    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP’s idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all
     
    Is much of the $75 billion or whatever in the form of equipment rather than cash? Yes or no?

    And if so, is it incorrect to state that we are sending $75 billion or whatever to Ukraine that could have been spent here?

    Try to be to honest, it’s hard for you in an argument, but do your best.

    And since a lot of the equipment consists of decades-old vehicles that were already paid for when they were made, the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    If Ukraine gets old Bradleys that have been sitting in a warehouse, that the government paid $200 million dollars for when they were made decades ago, no-one is paying that now. We are only paying for transport, but that cost is balanced by us no longer paying for storage and maintenance. But it’s counted as Ukraine getting $200 million dollars worth of Bradleys. And some dishonest guy like your beloved Matt Gaetz will count that as $200 million dollars cash sent to Ukraine that could have fed impoverished Americans, in order to attack the Biden administration and smart centrist Republicans who see this as good policy.

    On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks
     
    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting. It reflects how much the equipment cost when it was made, which they have purchase orders and receipts for. It’s inflated relative to how much it is worth now, but not relative to how much it cost when the Pentagon originally bought it (I am not sure if they use inflation adjustments). Like donating an old unused TV that someone paid $500 for 10 years ago, and having the receipt for that amount. When in reality such a TV would probably be worth $100 if someone tried to sell it today on eBay.

    but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed
     
    Back when there was bipartisan support (in part because the people involved probably understand what I am saying) a high number didn’t matter because everyone was in favor. Perhaps it even was good because it demonstrated a high level of commitment to the world and made it look like the USA was far more supportive than others. It later became a liability when bad actors chose to dishonestly present those numbers as taxpayer dollars being sent abroad.

    It would be funny if the standard accounting practice is abandoned and lower figures are used in the future, without changing the amount of equipment actually being sent to Ukraine. And this would then be successfully sold as “cutting costs.” The higher figures used before will have thus enabled more flexibility later.

    On the other hand, it doesn’t even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt

     

    How does exaggerating the current value of equipment that has already been paid for long ago, add to the deficit? Nobody is buying the equipment at the exaggerated price.

    Of course that is not the only things that we are sending to Ukraine. Ukraine is also getting a lot of ammo, which indeed is being produced and paid for now:

    In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog

     

    This pertains not to sending old equipment, but to sending Ukraine modern ammo such as artillery shells.

    1. Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money. Certainly better than welfare, left-wing NPR propagandists, etc. It helps keep this sector alive, which could be vitally important down the road. We are increasing shell production capacity, which is also a good thing. We are economically helping parts of the country outside the coasts.

    2. In some cases we are sending equipment to Ukraine and then replacing it with newer and better equipment. It’s a process of modernising and improving America’s military. Also a good thing.

    You can argue that we shouldn’t do such things - maybe you feel that America should have a small and weak military, so as not to be tempted to ever go beyond the borders - but don’t pretend that America can’t benefit from it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mikel

  149. @Mikel
    @Mr. Hack


    The US is fast going to lose its prestige of being the leader of the free world, and will be looked upon as an unreliable partner by any future allies and friends left in the world.
     
    All things considered, I consider the US to be the greatest country in the world but other than Israel and perhaps South Korea, I don't know who else may consider it today to be a very reliable ally.

    If your independence depends on the US continuing to support you indefinitely, you can't really say that you are an independent country. Apart from the possibility of American internal politics leading to the US doing a Kabul or a Saigon on you, your own internal politics are going to be scrutinized so that you comply with US norms that may not be part of your culture at all. I would certainly hate my country to be a Russian puppet. Just look at repressive and impoverished Belarus. But I don't think the Russians care about shoving any particular ideology down anybody's throat these days as much as the American Establishment does. Being such a great country inevitably led the US to become a superpower but sadly, that meant abandoning the non-interventionist spirit of earlier times.

    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US. Regardless of my thoughts about the tragedy that started in 2014, the Ukrainian military has shown a great deal of competence while the Russians have proven to be weaker and less competent than anybody thought. However, at the end of the day Russia continues to be a huge country with vast human and material resources and capable of fielding many advanced lethal weapons. Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war. Starting by not killing so many of their civilian co-ethnics, as I'll never tire to repeat.

    Replies: @LatW, @Beckow

    …Everybody should have done much more to avoid this tragic war.

    Nice sentiment, but it assumes that there were not people who wanted the war – not everybody wanted to avoid it. There were Ukies who out of stupidity or because they are fanatics thought that they can only achieve their objectives by a war – Zelko&Co. at least initially were not among them, but now they are.

    The destroy-Russia Nato-uber-alles neo-cons also wanted a war – there was no other way to get what they want: Crimea and to surround Russia militarily so they can try to dismantle it next time it goes through an internal crisis. And Russian security-types who thought that a war now is preferable to waiting until Nato-Ukraine are fully settled.

    The three forces now have a war. As always most of them are not suffering from it at all, they are safely in the back cheering it on…but this was a wanted war and a very much anticipated war.

  150. @LatW
    @Mikel


    If I was a Ukrainian military leader I would have serious contingency plans for the possibility of having to face Russia with no military help from the US.
     
    What makes you think they don't?

    Replies: @Mikel

    What makes you think they don’t?

    I’m pretty sure they do now. But I’m not sure what the thinking was a year and a half ago. Arestovich’s revelations suggest that at least the political leadership felt too secure about the West’s commitment and many thousands died and will continue to die for no larger gains than could have been achieved through negotiations then.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Mikel


    Arestovich’s revelations
     
    He's not entirely wrong, but in his recent statements he is going a bit too far (there have been a few exaggerations which suggests that he isn't entirely objective).

    the West’s commitment
     
    The West doesn't consist only of the US (and it is not even fully clear if the US will bail just yet).

    Replies: @QCIC, @John Johnson

  151. @Mikel
    @LatW


    What makes you think they don’t?
     
    I'm pretty sure they do now. But I'm not sure what the thinking was a year and a half ago. Arestovich's revelations suggest that at least the political leadership felt too secure about the West's commitment and many thousands died and will continue to die for no larger gains than could have been achieved through negotiations then.

    Replies: @LatW

    Arestovich’s revelations

    He’s not entirely wrong, but in his recent statements he is going a bit too far (there have been a few exaggerations which suggests that he isn’t entirely objective).

    the West’s commitment

    The West doesn’t consist only of the US (and it is not even fully clear if the US will bail just yet).

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @LatW

    The US deep state could still escalate in Ukraine, not really to save Ukraine or defeat Russia but mostly as a smokescreen to cover their tracks. The dollar-debt system system has the same stresses and built-in self-destruct mechanism as always and many people have always predicted that a major war would be associated with the transition away from the dollar. The Nulands and other criminals who promoted this conflict are sociopaths who would burn things down just to avoid accountability. Finally, there are a lot of confused and bloodthirsty warriors looking for blood, probably on all sides. Maybe the Ukies were right after all and humanity simply needs a stupid, brutal cleansing war every century to keep ourselves centered. Last time the body count was millions and this time it may be billions.

    , @John Johnson
    @LatW

    Historically both parties have a hard time resisting any type of defense spending. It's one of the few areas where they usually agree.

    Biden and the Democrats know that our asylum policy is a joke. They can't defend it on a rational level which makes a deal more likely.

    Odds thus favor a last minute deal but I wouldn't put it past 60-70%. They could bicker like schoolchildren as usual and then break for their extended vacation. A deal could be reached upon their return if Biden actually holds out over the border and basically loses a game of chicken.

    Biden is highballing with his 75 billion figure which shows he expects a deal. I'm gonna laugh if the GOP compromises on 50 or even 30 billion. That would be snookered by Mr. Magoo.

    20 billion is plenty for another year. The tanks on both sides are getting fouled up by minefields. The F16s are one the way which means they really need more artillery and HIMARs. Maybe some more Bradleys that have been mothballed. The 75 billion is really just a starting point.

    The Hispanic left is against any type of deal:
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/progressives-warn-biden-against-trading-border-reforms-for-ukraine-aid/ar-AA1lsHX8

    Weirdly the MAGA right and Hispanic left are on the same side. Trump dorks that think Russia is conservative Christian and Hispanics that want Brazil North. Both however are minorities within their parties.

    Even weirder is that the MAGA right wants to give Israel aid and without anything in return. Israel has a budget surplus and the MAGA loonies want to write them a check. These MAGA Republicans seem to be highly motivated by Christian fatalism. They think Trump is going to beat these felonies cause God is American. Maybe Trump needs to catch some felonies so these loonies re-think things.

  152. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    The Western news says the opposite of other international news sources. Which sources are more accurate, if any?

    I don't see any contradictory information. International media sources have reported that Russia has been throwing armored columns at Adiivka. Videos from Russians appear to confirm heavy losses and meat wave type attacks. There are drone videos from Ukraine showing graveyards of APCs.

    In the mean time I speculate based on reasonably well accepted facts about Russian military and industry.

    Are you suggesting that they are not trying to take Avdiivka?

    Your obsession with Putin seems to be getting worse.

    I don't see how. I've always assumed he has a very small penis.

    It takes a very special level of insecurity to be the world's richest man and in charge of the world's largest country and yet engage in ego fulfilling behavior where other people have to die.

    As for your video I didn't find it funny at all. Kind of reminded me of 21 jumpstreet with the corny and denigrating take on police work but without the occasional laugh. On an interesting side note that was the movie that made Kanye like Jews again. Poor Anglin had a magic negro crush on Kanye for ranting about the Jews but that movie put an end to it.

    Kanye decides that he likes Jews again after watching 21 Jumpstreet:
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/kanye-west-jonah-hill-21-jump-street-jewish-people-1234703761/

    Replies: @QCIC

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses. Then we have a ridiculous report from Uncle Sammy on the overall Russian losses. I would like to check the wording to see if the misrepresentation is bad as it seems.

    The best line in the video is where he has to rip through all the dishonest woke language and say “…do they have a hole or a pole”? That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people’s ideological blinders on this topic. The bit with “We’ve zapped three of them today, they’re everywhere this morning” is tragicomedy. This is tragedy because the destruction of reasonable polite society is what makes tyranny more likely. It is comedy in the “it is better to laugh that to cry” category. The stupid cops are foils that could be good or bad depending on the situation, but will always use force. The video has other stupid stuff and f-bombs I didn’t like, but the sections I listed are great.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses

    Do you have a link for your map video?

    I haven't seen anything suggesting that Ukraine has taken worse losses in Avdiivka. It appears that once again the fighting favors the defensive and the Russians are sending meat waves.

    Russia is clearly trying to take Avdiivka which shows that Putin is not merely trying to play a long game. He is most likely telling his Generals to "send em anyways" even if they warn of losses. Very similar to Hitler demanding offensives for morale when the war strategy after Stalingrad favored the defense. Putin wants at least a short term political win and is willing to throw untrained and poorly equipped men at the front. Perhaps he can absorb the losses but he is risking a short term political loss if Ukraine can manage to hold on.

    That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people’s ideological blinders on this topic.

    I only recognize 2 of 16 genders and I didn't find it funny. A bit amateurish but maybe it appeals more to people that feel controlled by woke ideology. I'm not a fan of the Wokester crowd but it is much worse in the cities. The cities are magnets for the identity confused. The libs here normally leave when they turn 18.

    Replies: @QCIC

    , @Wokechoke
    @QCIC

    Ukies are stretched thin.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  153. @Mikhail
    Ukraine was never going to win – US senator
    https://www.rt.com/news/588986-ukraine-never-win-senator/

    Tommy Tuberville has also dismissed the notion that Russia could invade EU states as just a “selling point”

    -----------------------------

    Zelensky Presses the Flesh for $ in DC, Lloyd Austin Threatens to Send Families of Republican Congressmen & Senators to Fight Russia, Trump Doesn't Like Ukraine, US Semiconductor Sanctions Fail, more.
    https://marksleboda.substack.com/p/zelensky-presses-the-flesh-for-in?utm_source=profile&utm_medium=reader2

    Replies: @QCIC

    Is there video of Austin making the threatening comments, even if couched in political rhetoric? Sounds like potential grounds for immediate firing. When is this mentioned in the interview?

  154. @Beckow
    @AnonfromTN


    ...they do not need anyone to deceive them, they effectively deceive themselves.
     
    It is even worse: they believe that wars are won by PR deceptions. Thy think that if they win in the media (Western house media) that's all that matters. It is a meta-war: a "war about the war" in front of the public - and themselves. It is closer to self-therapy than to geo-politics.

    The claim of 87% is of course intentionally stupid - not meant to be believed, it is a spit at the enemy as the war is being lost. Germans did very much the same thing in the last year of the war. The actual number of casualties given that Russia had in early 2022 700k active troops - plus the Donbas and other militias like Chechens - would by over 600k....riiiiight, that had to be quite a meeting as they settled on the "number"...I see a few elderly women staring at PowerPoint slides...

    This is very sad, even tragic, but let's also appreciate the entertainment value that is just precious, it cut sthrough the brain-dead Western culture like a lightning...I am hoping they grab it and make something out of it. But probably not...

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    https://flowofwisdom.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/mindwar-mindwar_co_authored_by_michael-aquino.pdf

    This is obsolete and replaced by his book.

    They are not only making war on the Russians. They are making war on everybody. No way can it continue forever but it has been going on for a very long time if you ask me. The book is excellent. He leaves out a lot, but what is in there is pretty reliable. I heard an interview with him shortly before he died which might have been his last public interview. He said nine eleven was a controlled demolition job which was obvious to all on the day it happened.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @John Johnson

  155. @LatW
    @Mikel


    Arestovich’s revelations
     
    He's not entirely wrong, but in his recent statements he is going a bit too far (there have been a few exaggerations which suggests that he isn't entirely objective).

    the West’s commitment
     
    The West doesn't consist only of the US (and it is not even fully clear if the US will bail just yet).

    Replies: @QCIC, @John Johnson

    The US deep state could still escalate in Ukraine, not really to save Ukraine or defeat Russia but mostly as a smokescreen to cover their tracks. The dollar-debt system system has the same stresses and built-in self-destruct mechanism as always and many people have always predicted that a major war would be associated with the transition away from the dollar. The Nulands and other criminals who promoted this conflict are sociopaths who would burn things down just to avoid accountability. Finally, there are a lot of confused and bloodthirsty warriors looking for blood, probably on all sides. Maybe the Ukies were right after all and humanity simply needs a stupid, brutal cleansing war every century to keep ourselves centered. Last time the body count was millions and this time it may be billions.

  156. • Replies: @A123
    @Sher Singh

    Was Pontius Pilate Jewish? Nope.
    Were his Roman soldiers Jewish? Nope.
    Jesus was killed by pantheists.

    A key difference is proselytization:
        • Jews were not trying to convert Christians to Judaism.
        • Pagans would try to pull believers away from Christianity.
    The need to place tighter limits on pagans is fairly obvious in terms of survival.


    Other critical difference are population and timing -- in the Empire generally & Rome specifically.

        • How many Jews were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Not many. Those who voluntarily travelled to Rome would likely be well off with a good reason to be there.

    For those in the Eastern Empire, they had been effectively integrated for hundreds of years. Many Jewish leaders actively supported imperial rule, and thus were supported by the empire. How much do you want to bet that the term "especially pious" is not actual piety? It is more likely code. Think patronage. The Empire designates specific senior rabbis to grant limited numbers of exemptions, including their own family members. Bought loyalty is always a bit chancy, but not a bad technique in outlying territories.

        • How many pagans were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Many. They were often brought back as slaves, after various campaign.

    There was no history of successfully co-opting pagan religious leaders. The last thing the Empire wanted was charismatic opposition leaders appearing within their own borders. Thus breaking paganism was a necessary element for the secular side of the structure. It also served religious leaders in the Empire, as it opened the door to proselytizing and converting former pagans.
    ___

    Ask this better question -- Why wouldn't Christian Emperors protect a well integrated, useful, & non-threatening sect that shared some beliefs, including the Ten Commandments?
    ___

    The weird fetish of blaming "100% of all Jews" for problems never makes any sense. Every religion is plagued by tiny sub groups of the population misbehaving to become powerful. Calling out specific oligarchs is a good idea. But, when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations? It does happen from time to time, but it is not a reliable logical construct for broad application.

    Would a group foul oligarchs who happened to be Sikhs make "100% of all Sikhs" pariahs, responsible for global sin?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Beckow

  157. @LatW
    @Mikel


    Arestovich’s revelations
     
    He's not entirely wrong, but in his recent statements he is going a bit too far (there have been a few exaggerations which suggests that he isn't entirely objective).

    the West’s commitment
     
    The West doesn't consist only of the US (and it is not even fully clear if the US will bail just yet).

    Replies: @QCIC, @John Johnson

    Historically both parties have a hard time resisting any type of defense spending. It’s one of the few areas where they usually agree.

    Biden and the Democrats know that our asylum policy is a joke. They can’t defend it on a rational level which makes a deal more likely.

    Odds thus favor a last minute deal but I wouldn’t put it past 60-70%. They could bicker like schoolchildren as usual and then break for their extended vacation. A deal could be reached upon their return if Biden actually holds out over the border and basically loses a game of chicken.

    Biden is highballing with his 75 billion figure which shows he expects a deal. I’m gonna laugh if the GOP compromises on 50 or even 30 billion. That would be snookered by Mr. Magoo.

    20 billion is plenty for another year. The tanks on both sides are getting fouled up by minefields. The F16s are one the way which means they really need more artillery and HIMARs. Maybe some more Bradleys that have been mothballed. The 75 billion is really just a starting point.

    The Hispanic left is against any type of deal:
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/progressives-warn-biden-against-trading-border-reforms-for-ukraine-aid/ar-AA1lsHX8

    Weirdly the MAGA right and Hispanic left are on the same side. Trump dorks that think Russia is conservative Christian and Hispanics that want Brazil North. Both however are minorities within their parties.

    Even weirder is that the MAGA right wants to give Israel aid and without anything in return. Israel has a budget surplus and the MAGA loonies want to write them a check. These MAGA Republicans seem to be highly motivated by Christian fatalism. They think Trump is going to beat these felonies cause God is American. Maybe Trump needs to catch some felonies so these loonies re-think things.

  158. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Beckow

    https://flowofwisdom.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/mindwar-mindwar_co_authored_by_michael-aquino.pdf

    This is obsolete and replaced by his book.

    https://www.amazon.com/MindWar-Michael-Aquino-Ph-D/dp/1535199563

    They are not only making war on the Russians. They are making war on everybody. No way can it continue forever but it has been going on for a very long time if you ask me. The book is excellent. He leaves out a lot, but what is in there is pretty reliable. I heard an interview with him shortly before he died which might have been his last public interview. He said nine eleven was a controlled demolition job which was obvious to all on the day it happened.

    Replies: @QCIC

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @QCIC

    All here at unz includes complete whackos. I am pretty sure it is not obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition. P~.9. There is an epidemic of post traumatic stress disorder on planet earth, all of planet earth. That is a reality distortion field of awesome power. None of us is immune. Looking at JFK's head splattered and thousands of people squashed by the towers over and over again is trauma.

    In r/military a couple of days ago they had a video of the remains of a Russian column wiped out by a HIMARS with a cluster munitions warhead of 200 000 tungsten beads which is designed to kill every living creature within a 300 m radius.

    , @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    A demolition job after the planes hit? Is that what you are saying?

    Or just building 7?

    Replies: @QCIC

  159. @QCIC
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @John Johnson

    All here at unz includes complete whackos. I am pretty sure it is not obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition. P~.9. There is an epidemic of post traumatic stress disorder on planet earth, all of planet earth. That is a reality distortion field of awesome power. None of us is immune. Looking at JFK’s head splattered and thousands of people squashed by the towers over and over again is trauma.

    In r/military a couple of days ago they had a video of the remains of a Russian column wiped out by a HIMARS with a cluster munitions warhead of 200 000 tungsten beads which is designed to kill every living creature within a 300 m radius.

  160. @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I don't keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last "map" video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses. Then we have a ridiculous report from Uncle Sammy on the overall Russian losses. I would like to check the wording to see if the misrepresentation is bad as it seems.

    The best line in the video is where he has to rip through all the dishonest woke language and say "...do they have a hole or a pole"? That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people's ideological blinders on this topic. The bit with "We've zapped three of them today, they're everywhere this morning" is tragicomedy. This is tragedy because the destruction of reasonable polite society is what makes tyranny more likely. It is comedy in the "it is better to laugh that to cry" category. The stupid cops are foils that could be good or bad depending on the situation, but will always use force. The video has other stupid stuff and f-bombs I didn't like, but the sections I listed are great.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Wokechoke

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses

    Do you have a link for your map video?

    I haven’t seen anything suggesting that Ukraine has taken worse losses in Avdiivka. It appears that once again the fighting favors the defensive and the Russians are sending meat waves.

    Russia is clearly trying to take Avdiivka which shows that Putin is not merely trying to play a long game. He is most likely telling his Generals to “send em anyways” even if they warn of losses. Very similar to Hitler demanding offensives for morale when the war strategy after Stalingrad favored the defense. Putin wants at least a short term political win and is willing to throw untrained and poorly equipped men at the front. Perhaps he can absorb the losses but he is risking a short term political loss if Ukraine can manage to hold on.

    That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people’s ideological blinders on this topic.

    I only recognize 2 of 16 genders and I didn’t find it funny. A bit amateurish but maybe it appeals more to people that feel controlled by woke ideology. I’m not a fan of the Wokester crowd but it is much worse in the cities. The cities are magnets for the identity confused. The libs here normally leave when they turn 18.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I think the source for the map video I mentioned was the "Deer Friends" person. Here is the latest one which popped up. I skimmed it very briefly, more dead people on both sides.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pckz1K8Ou3w

    Replies: @John Johnson

  161. @AP
    @Beckow


    I am not sure about Russia, but Ukraine is definitely paying a very steep price.
     
    Russia has lost about 100k+ dead and counting, lots of military equipment, and an economy that is a lot worse than would have been otherwise.

    They had the option of being rich, neutral, populous country, wealthy in resources, trading with both EU and Russia
     
    When Ukraine pursued a neutral policy it was the second poorest country in Europe only Moldova, another country pursuing a neutral policy - was poorer.

    Ukraine was finally catching up after 2016, so Russia invaded.

    regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent.

    Not true, Kiev has received at least $40 billion in cash from US and EU.
     
    The snippet you cut out referred specifically to the value of the equipment Ukraine was getting.

    This was the full paragraph that snippet came from:

    "A lot of that amount [aid] is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren’t sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn’t cash being sent."

    no wonder they are asking for C130 planes now, to take all that cash out to safe havens is a logistic nightmare. The Afghani guy 2 years ago put it in a few bags and flew to Dubai in his private jet. But he was a small player and Arabs don’t ask too many questions. Ukraine is different, how much of that cash do you think has been stolen?
     
    Do you have significant evidence of cash being stolen and/or removed in airplanes?

    In retrospect the damned Yanuk had the most rational policy: internal equality of Ukies and Russians, and playing Moscow against Brussels to get something from each.
     
    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    Replies: @Beckow, @Mr. XYZ

    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    Those Ukrainians who wanted to move towards Russia would have been better off not voting for Ukrainian independence back in 1991. Much less suffering that way. The raison d’etre of Ukrainian independence was to eventually join the European Union, which ultimately is much more impressive than the Soviet Union was anyway (many more people of higher average quality).

  162. @QCIC
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @John Johnson

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    A demolition job after the planes hit? Is that what you are saying?

    Or just building 7?

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    All the above.

    I look at the "big picture" on 911 as with Ukraine, so I don't have much to say about the details as interesting as they are. The main point is the overall story is full of lies all the way down. The problem is not just any particular lie, but the weight of the lies.

    Pre-installed demolition was apparently involved and was likely more consequential than aircraft.

  163. @Mikel
    @A123


    I accept your apology.
     
    I also accept AP's apology to you. One needs to be magnanimous always.

    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP's idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all. This is a line that he's kept repeating for months now so there is no hope that he'll abandon it. He'd rather spend sleepless nights defending it post after post with a hundred graphs. But it doesn't make any sense. On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed. Impossible to believe.

    On the other hand, it doesn't even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt (as long as demand for the gargantuan US debt continues to exist), the interests of which we also have to pay with our taxes. In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog but we should feel grateful about it lol.

    Replies: @AP

    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP’s idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all

    Is much of the $75 billion or whatever in the form of equipment rather than cash? Yes or no?

    And if so, is it incorrect to state that we are sending $75 billion or whatever to Ukraine that could have been spent here?

    Try to be to honest, it’s hard for you in an argument, but do your best.

    And since a lot of the equipment consists of decades-old vehicles that were already paid for when they were made, the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    If Ukraine gets old Bradleys that have been sitting in a warehouse, that the government paid $200 million dollars for when they were made decades ago, no-one is paying that now. We are only paying for transport, but that cost is balanced by us no longer paying for storage and maintenance. But it’s counted as Ukraine getting $200 million dollars worth of Bradleys. And some dishonest guy like your beloved Matt Gaetz will count that as $200 million dollars cash sent to Ukraine that could have fed impoverished Americans, in order to attack the Biden administration and smart centrist Republicans who see this as good policy.

    On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks

    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting. It reflects how much the equipment cost when it was made, which they have purchase orders and receipts for. It’s inflated relative to how much it is worth now, but not relative to how much it cost when the Pentagon originally bought it (I am not sure if they use inflation adjustments). Like donating an old unused TV that someone paid $500 for 10 years ago, and having the receipt for that amount. When in reality such a TV would probably be worth $100 if someone tried to sell it today on eBay.

    but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed

    Back when there was bipartisan support (in part because the people involved probably understand what I am saying) a high number didn’t matter because everyone was in favor. Perhaps it even was good because it demonstrated a high level of commitment to the world and made it look like the USA was far more supportive than others. It later became a liability when bad actors chose to dishonestly present those numbers as taxpayer dollars being sent abroad.

    It would be funny if the standard accounting practice is abandoned and lower figures are used in the future, without changing the amount of equipment actually being sent to Ukraine. And this would then be successfully sold as “cutting costs.” The higher figures used before will have thus enabled more flexibility later.

    On the other hand, it doesn’t even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt

    How does exaggerating the current value of equipment that has already been paid for long ago, add to the deficit? Nobody is buying the equipment at the exaggerated price.

    Of course that is not the only things that we are sending to Ukraine. Ukraine is also getting a lot of ammo, which indeed is being produced and paid for now:

    In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog

    This pertains not to sending old equipment, but to sending Ukraine modern ammo such as artillery shells.

    1. Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money. Certainly better than welfare, left-wing NPR propagandists, etc. It helps keep this sector alive, which could be vitally important down the road. We are increasing shell production capacity, which is also a good thing. We are economically helping parts of the country outside the coasts.

    2. In some cases we are sending equipment to Ukraine and then replacing it with newer and better equipment. It’s a process of modernising and improving America’s military. Also a good thing.

    You can argue that we shouldn’t do such things – maybe you feel that America should have a small and weak military, so as not to be tempted to ever go beyond the borders – but don’t pretend that America can’t benefit from it.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @QCIC
    @AP

    Based on my casual observations the total amount of equipment supplied by the USA to Ukraine seems very small (the number of old tanks, missiles, Patriot systems) compared to the dollar figures given. I wonder if the difference is in cash payouts to various Ukrainians? This suspicion is based on known (or perceived) criminality of Ukrainian oligarchs as well as known financial malfeasance of US military contractors in Afghanistan and other recent conflicts.

    The valuation ambiguities you mention could play an important role, especially in money laundering.


    +++

    Someone mentioned that $8.5 trillion of US Treasury debt needs to be rolled over in 2024. The presenter implied that at the current interest rate this is fiscally impossible so the interest rate will be reduced and inflation growth will accelerate again. This seems more serious than the financial problems Russia is facing.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Mikel
    @AP


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.
     
    Of course it's all being paid by us taxpayers.

    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds. There is no such thing as getting a supplemental appropriations bill approved without adding to the deficit. Period. Technically speaking, I guess the bill adds to the deficit when the government actually uses the Treasury to allocate the funds but that's what the bill does: allow the executive to use the Treasury for the requested purpose.

    I'm not going to repeat how an increased deficit is paid for. If you don't know that, any further discussion is a total waste of time.

    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting.
     
    I don't know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent. That is the real standard way of accounting. If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all. And that's just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.

    Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money.
     
    Not for those workers and their employers certainly. For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad. We would all choose better uses for the part of that money that comes from our pockets, if given the chance. If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy and we'd all be much richer. Why hasn't anyone thought of that before you?

    Try to be to honest
     
    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer. And while doing it tries to make people here believe that the constitutional and national accounting processes have stopped working as usual or that new brave economic theories have started to come into effect. It is actually you who is doing all those ridiculous claims.

    Replies: @Beckow, @AP

  164. @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Thanks, interesting links.


    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia
     
    It's understandable, but they weren't as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia
     
    Great photo, you can tell the guy was totally into languages and "going native". He's German Prussian, btw, so practically Baltic German, one can say.

    "Möllendorff also advocated that Korea enter into an alliance with the Russian Empire to counterbalance Chinese and Japanese influences on the Korean peninsula." (Wiki)

    Alliance is different than being completely swamped. Hard to say what is more useful here, doing translations or political advisory.


    Here’s a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries
     
    Thanks, this was quite an operation, what is fascinating about it is just the sheer geographic span of all these connections and how they trailed and connected towards a common result. Btw, this org, those were not Bolshes, but social democrats of that time, which by today's standards would be a sort of republican or simply people who wanted modernization (which by the European standards of those times just meant basic rights). Also, to stop Russification of local nationalities.

    And the punitive action after 1905 was just insanely brutal (ordered by Nikolai). Executing, whipping to the point where people were crippled for life, torturing, even women. This was done by Tsar's Cossacks that were brought in. When you do that to your subjects, in the 20th century, you should know it's over. Although there was both good and bad in the Empire.

    And, btw, the modern Latvians (and Estonians) themselves do not like addressing this at all - burning the German estates is really looked down upon, as a shameful piece of history, anything openly anti-German is a big "no no" these days, so very different from those times. But once you start educating them, they start having sympathy for those folks who lived a 100 years ago.

    It is good to be able to look at those times with the distance we have now.

    From what I understand, Japan's collaboration with the Poles was deeper but it's interesting to see that it even reached Finns and Latvians. I'm sure a lot can be found in the revolutionary letters and diaries and such.

    Btw, there is a map that shows the route of the ships that went from Latvia towards Japan (the route is Liepaja to Vladivostok), all the way around Africa. I don't know how to post the map but if you open this link and scroll down, in the middle of the article you'll see three maps, and one of them shows it (the smaller one) - a red line that goes through the Suez canal and towards Asia. 30 warships and 25 cargo ships. They were insane.

    You can see it in this link:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/skirklis/64752-Krievijas%E2%80%93Jap%C4%81nas-kar%C5%A1

    Japanese troops in defense positions:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/api/image/original?name=df0390c82195-2986d039-2f42-438f-8173-1746c0e0ee19.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    It’s understandable, but they weren’t as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    On a related note, why did the Soviet Union not annex North Korea after WWII? Was it for similar reasons as to why it did not annex Mongolia during the decades of the Cold War? Or would annexing North Korea have simply not been accepted by the North Korean population, even by their Communists, due to it looking like a predatory imperialist act?

    Korea as a part of the Russian Empire or, alternatively, as a part of a reformed liberal non-Bolshevik-ruled post-Tsarist Russia would certainly be very interesting. I’m just not sure that it’s actually realistic, unfortunately.

  165. @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I don't keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last "map" video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses. Then we have a ridiculous report from Uncle Sammy on the overall Russian losses. I would like to check the wording to see if the misrepresentation is bad as it seems.

    The best line in the video is where he has to rip through all the dishonest woke language and say "...do they have a hole or a pole"? That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people's ideological blinders on this topic. The bit with "We've zapped three of them today, they're everywhere this morning" is tragicomedy. This is tragedy because the destruction of reasonable polite society is what makes tyranny more likely. It is comedy in the "it is better to laugh that to cry" category. The stupid cops are foils that could be good or bad depending on the situation, but will always use force. The video has other stupid stuff and f-bombs I didn't like, but the sections I listed are great.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Wokechoke

    Ukies are stretched thin.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Ukies are stretched thin in areas where combat is minimal or non-existent and adequate in the hot spots. The concept of using "meat waives" is foreign to the Ukrainian's side and seems a preferred method for the Russian side. Basically, the Ukrainian side seems much more intelligent and focused in using its resources in conducting this war, with very few exceptions.

    https://claytoonz.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/rough1924-1.jpg?w=2048

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  166. @Wokechoke
    @QCIC

    Ukies are stretched thin.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Ukies are stretched thin in areas where combat is minimal or non-existent and adequate in the hot spots. The concept of using “meat waives” is foreign to the Ukrainian’s side and seems a preferred method for the Russian side. Basically, the Ukrainian side seems much more intelligent and focused in using its resources in conducting this war, with very few exceptions.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    Meat Waves?

    Is that on the memo?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  167. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Ukies are stretched thin in areas where combat is minimal or non-existent and adequate in the hot spots. The concept of using "meat waives" is foreign to the Ukrainian's side and seems a preferred method for the Russian side. Basically, the Ukrainian side seems much more intelligent and focused in using its resources in conducting this war, with very few exceptions.

    https://claytoonz.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/rough1924-1.jpg?w=2048

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Meat Waves?

    Is that on the memo?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    I don't know about "memo", but it's certainly to be seen in Adviivka. Why don't you take your sword out of mothballs and enlist in Putler's army and you can see for yourself first hand? I hear that that they're offering a 5k bonus right now for new conscripts.

    https://central.asia-news.com/cnmi_ca/images/2023/01/26/40456-mobilization_1-739_416.webp
    A fine example of Putler's savvy marketing department, designed to attract patriots like you and Professor Janissary to join and help the cause...soldiers of fortune like kremlinstoogeA123 are welcome too.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  168. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    Meat Waves?

    Is that on the memo?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I don’t know about “memo”, but it’s certainly to be seen in Adviivka. Why don’t you take your sword out of mothballs and enlist in Putler’s army and you can see for yourself first hand? I hear that that they’re offering a 5k bonus right now for new conscripts.
    A fine example of Putler’s savvy marketing department, designed to attract patriots like you and Professor Janissary to join and help the cause…soldiers of fortune like kremlinstoogeA123 are welcome too.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    You are so fucking wierd m’dude.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  169. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    It is obvious to all here at Unz that 911 was a controlled demolition job, yes?

    A demolition job after the planes hit? Is that what you are saying?

    Or just building 7?

    Replies: @QCIC

    All the above.

    I look at the “big picture” on 911 as with Ukraine, so I don’t have much to say about the details as interesting as they are. The main point is the overall story is full of lies all the way down. The problem is not just any particular lie, but the weight of the lies.

    Pre-installed demolition was apparently involved and was likely more consequential than aircraft.

  170. @John Johnson
    Rural Russians are the biggest saps:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aExw0KKvPt8

    This is exactly what happened with Stalin.

    The people assumed the complaints weren't getting to him. If only Stalin knew!!!!

    Your Tsar knows and he doesn't care. DERRRRR

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    This kind of stuff helps to explain why Putler is causing wars in neighboring countries, in order to to deflect scrutiny exposing the endemic rot within Russia. Of course those that have fled Russia and have managed to to comfortably blend in somewhere in the West, can sit around and bellyache over the time constraints of Minsk 2 agreements, but what of those left behind? They don’t really give a s__t.

  171. @AP
    @Mikel


    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP’s idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all
     
    Is much of the $75 billion or whatever in the form of equipment rather than cash? Yes or no?

    And if so, is it incorrect to state that we are sending $75 billion or whatever to Ukraine that could have been spent here?

    Try to be to honest, it’s hard for you in an argument, but do your best.

    And since a lot of the equipment consists of decades-old vehicles that were already paid for when they were made, the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    If Ukraine gets old Bradleys that have been sitting in a warehouse, that the government paid $200 million dollars for when they were made decades ago, no-one is paying that now. We are only paying for transport, but that cost is balanced by us no longer paying for storage and maintenance. But it’s counted as Ukraine getting $200 million dollars worth of Bradleys. And some dishonest guy like your beloved Matt Gaetz will count that as $200 million dollars cash sent to Ukraine that could have fed impoverished Americans, in order to attack the Biden administration and smart centrist Republicans who see this as good policy.

    On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks
     
    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting. It reflects how much the equipment cost when it was made, which they have purchase orders and receipts for. It’s inflated relative to how much it is worth now, but not relative to how much it cost when the Pentagon originally bought it (I am not sure if they use inflation adjustments). Like donating an old unused TV that someone paid $500 for 10 years ago, and having the receipt for that amount. When in reality such a TV would probably be worth $100 if someone tried to sell it today on eBay.

    but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed
     
    Back when there was bipartisan support (in part because the people involved probably understand what I am saying) a high number didn’t matter because everyone was in favor. Perhaps it even was good because it demonstrated a high level of commitment to the world and made it look like the USA was far more supportive than others. It later became a liability when bad actors chose to dishonestly present those numbers as taxpayer dollars being sent abroad.

    It would be funny if the standard accounting practice is abandoned and lower figures are used in the future, without changing the amount of equipment actually being sent to Ukraine. And this would then be successfully sold as “cutting costs.” The higher figures used before will have thus enabled more flexibility later.

    On the other hand, it doesn’t even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt

     

    How does exaggerating the current value of equipment that has already been paid for long ago, add to the deficit? Nobody is buying the equipment at the exaggerated price.

    Of course that is not the only things that we are sending to Ukraine. Ukraine is also getting a lot of ammo, which indeed is being produced and paid for now:

    In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog

     

    This pertains not to sending old equipment, but to sending Ukraine modern ammo such as artillery shells.

    1. Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money. Certainly better than welfare, left-wing NPR propagandists, etc. It helps keep this sector alive, which could be vitally important down the road. We are increasing shell production capacity, which is also a good thing. We are economically helping parts of the country outside the coasts.

    2. In some cases we are sending equipment to Ukraine and then replacing it with newer and better equipment. It’s a process of modernising and improving America’s military. Also a good thing.

    You can argue that we shouldn’t do such things - maybe you feel that America should have a small and weak military, so as not to be tempted to ever go beyond the borders - but don’t pretend that America can’t benefit from it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mikel

    Based on my casual observations the total amount of equipment supplied by the USA to Ukraine seems very small (the number of old tanks, missiles, Patriot systems) compared to the dollar figures given. I wonder if the difference is in cash payouts to various Ukrainians? This suspicion is based on known (or perceived) criminality of Ukrainian oligarchs as well as known financial malfeasance of US military contractors in Afghanistan and other recent conflicts.

    The valuation ambiguities you mention could play an important role, especially in money laundering.

    +++

    Someone mentioned that $8.5 trillion of US Treasury debt needs to be rolled over in 2024. The presenter implied that at the current interest rate this is fiscally impossible so the interest rate will be reduced and inflation growth will accelerate again. This seems more serious than the financial problems Russia is facing.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Based on my casual observations the total amount of equipment supplied by the USA to Ukraine seems very small (the number of old tanks, missiles, Patriot systems) compared to the dollar figures given.

    Military is the largest amount
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/world/how-much-aid-the-u-s-has-sent-to-ukraine-in-6-charts

  172. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses

    Do you have a link for your map video?

    I haven't seen anything suggesting that Ukraine has taken worse losses in Avdiivka. It appears that once again the fighting favors the defensive and the Russians are sending meat waves.

    Russia is clearly trying to take Avdiivka which shows that Putin is not merely trying to play a long game. He is most likely telling his Generals to "send em anyways" even if they warn of losses. Very similar to Hitler demanding offensives for morale when the war strategy after Stalingrad favored the defense. Putin wants at least a short term political win and is willing to throw untrained and poorly equipped men at the front. Perhaps he can absorb the losses but he is risking a short term political loss if Ukraine can manage to hold on.

    That is funny because it shows the primitive level that society is being dragged down to by the dishonest woke madness. It is deadly serious but is made funny to hopefully slip through some people’s ideological blinders on this topic.

    I only recognize 2 of 16 genders and I didn't find it funny. A bit amateurish but maybe it appeals more to people that feel controlled by woke ideology. I'm not a fan of the Wokester crowd but it is much worse in the cities. The cities are magnets for the identity confused. The libs here normally leave when they turn 18.

    Replies: @QCIC

    I think the source for the map video I mentioned was the “Deer Friends” person. Here is the latest one which popped up. I skimmed it very briefly, more dead people on both sides.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Nothing in that video indicates massive losses by Ukraine when defending Avdiivka.

    Replies: @QCIC

  173. @QCIC
    @AP

    Based on my casual observations the total amount of equipment supplied by the USA to Ukraine seems very small (the number of old tanks, missiles, Patriot systems) compared to the dollar figures given. I wonder if the difference is in cash payouts to various Ukrainians? This suspicion is based on known (or perceived) criminality of Ukrainian oligarchs as well as known financial malfeasance of US military contractors in Afghanistan and other recent conflicts.

    The valuation ambiguities you mention could play an important role, especially in money laundering.


    +++

    Someone mentioned that $8.5 trillion of US Treasury debt needs to be rolled over in 2024. The presenter implied that at the current interest rate this is fiscally impossible so the interest rate will be reduced and inflation growth will accelerate again. This seems more serious than the financial problems Russia is facing.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Based on my casual observations the total amount of equipment supplied by the USA to Ukraine seems very small (the number of old tanks, missiles, Patriot systems) compared to the dollar figures given.

    Military is the largest amount
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/world/how-much-aid-the-u-s-has-sent-to-ukraine-in-6-charts

  174. @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I think the source for the map video I mentioned was the "Deer Friends" person. Here is the latest one which popped up. I skimmed it very briefly, more dead people on both sides.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pckz1K8Ou3w

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Nothing in that video indicates massive losses by Ukraine when defending Avdiivka.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    Your words not mine. I said I haven't paid attention to Avdiika or most other battles. I did say there are lots of causalities on both sides. I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement. Your mileage may vary.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  175. @Sher Singh
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/640459736919048202/1184694407375634492/IMG_4008.jpg

    Replies: @A123

    Was Pontius Pilate Jewish? Nope.
    Were his Roman soldiers Jewish? Nope.
    Jesus was killed by pantheists.

    A key difference is proselytization:
        • Jews were not trying to convert Christians to Judaism.
        • Pagans would try to pull believers away from Christianity.
    The need to place tighter limits on pagans is fairly obvious in terms of survival.

    Other critical difference are population and timing — in the Empire generally & Rome specifically.

        • How many Jews were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Not many. Those who voluntarily travelled to Rome would likely be well off with a good reason to be there.

    For those in the Eastern Empire, they had been effectively integrated for hundreds of years. Many Jewish leaders actively supported imperial rule, and thus were supported by the empire. How much do you want to bet that the term “especially pious” is not actual piety? It is more likely code. Think patronage. The Empire designates specific senior rabbis to grant limited numbers of exemptions, including their own family members. Bought loyalty is always a bit chancy, but not a bad technique in outlying territories.

        • How many pagans were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Many. They were often brought back as slaves, after various campaign.

    There was no history of successfully co-opting pagan religious leaders. The last thing the Empire wanted was charismatic opposition leaders appearing within their own borders. Thus breaking paganism was a necessary element for the secular side of the structure. It also served religious leaders in the Empire, as it opened the door to proselytizing and converting former pagans.
    ___

    Ask this better question — Why wouldn’t Christian Emperors protect a well integrated, useful, & non-threatening sect that shared some beliefs, including the Ten Commandments?
    ___

    The weird fetish of blaming “100% of all Jews” for problems never makes any sense. Every religion is plagued by tiny sub groups of the population misbehaving to become powerful. Calling out specific oligarchs is a good idea. But, when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations? It does happen from time to time, but it is not a reliable logical construct for broad application.

    Would a group foul oligarchs who happened to be Sikhs make “100% of all Sikhs” pariahs, responsible for global sin?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @A123


    ...when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations?
     
    Happens more often than we like to admit. People are always at awe of wealth...

    But let's focus: the ruling party in Israel has in its programme that Israel includes all land between the sea and Jordan river, it specifically excludes the possibility of a Pali state. They constantly repeat it. There are 7 million Palis in Israel-Palestine - only about 1 1/2 million are citizens. 5.5 million people are effectively colonized, powerless subjects - it can't stay that way. Israelis through its government exclude the two-state solution. It is a democracy and the people are after few decades responsible - they have voted again and again for it. Netanyahu is their representative.

    If not a two-state, what is your solution? It can't go on any longer, what do you propose for the 5.5 million Palis living there?

    If you even indirectly start advocating expulsion ("relocation", "voluntary" departure...) you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    The only other logical alternative is a single state: 7 million Jews and 7 million Palis learn how to live together. That's where it is heading. All else are ugly hatreds and dreams by fanatics. So own up to either calling for a genocide or accepting a single state. It was Israel that refused the two-state solution.

    Replies: @A123

  176. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Nothing in that video indicates massive losses by Ukraine when defending Avdiivka.

    Replies: @QCIC

    Your words not mine. I said I haven’t paid attention to Avdiika or most other battles. I did say there are lots of causalities on both sides. I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement. Your mileage may vary.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Your words not mine.

    Well you made this comment:

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses.

    I haven't seen evidence of massive Ukrainian losses anywhere in the last two months. Practically all of the fighting has been in a single area. The Russians have been on the offensive as Putin is clearly trying to take Avdiivka under some type of time or political pressure.

    I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement.

    I see no reason to assume that the Ukrainians have higher casualties unless you are ignoring Wagner's losses. Even in that case I would be skeptical.

    I would at the very least expect Russia to have a higher kill / casualty loss ratio as they clearly don't value their conscripts and have medical shortages. Meaning Putin would prefer them to die in a ditch rather than come back and tie up a hospital bed.

    It's possible that Ukrainians have a higher casualty count overall but I don't see strong evidence either way. As I said before we will probably never know the actual Russian casualty count as there is widespread evidence that Russia has sent conscripts off the books. Wives are having to send their husbands food so I think rumors of Russia trying to avoid payment for service are most likely true.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDfLpwafGSc

    In fact when the war is over I'm sure we will hear stories from Russian doctors on how they put down patients like dogs. A Belarusian doctor who escaped after the invasion described Russians literally dropping off the dying outside the doors of the hospital. The Russians had completely underestimated the Ukrainians and were not prepared for mass casualties. He had to sneak out with his family as he was understandably afraid of being a threat for knowing too much.

    I bet it will come out that they were putting down quadriplegics and similar cases. There are drone videos in fact of Russians shooting their wounded. It will be just like Nazi Germany where they decide that certain veterans are to be given the "mercy bullet" as the Germans called it.

    Replies: @QCIC

  177. @AP
    @Beckow


    The strategy that had led Ukraine to fall behind both Poland (which move Westward) and Belarus (which moved towards Russia).

    That shows that Ukies beat anyone, east or west, when it comes to stealing.
     
    The Sovoks such as Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    What does significant stealing mean to you? Kiev got $40 billion in pure cash – how much was stolen? Was it significant to you
     
    I asked you for evidence that a significant portion of the $40 billion in cash assistance was stolen.

    You provided none.

    You want a number? Well, 1% would be significant. Any evidence of $400 million having been stolen? Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft, surely it would be easy to find evidence of that.

    If you believe that Russia lost “100k” soldiers, how
     
    How many do you think Russia has lost since the invasion started in February 2022?

    Or is it 10k as you once claimed?

     

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war (unless I mentioned such a number in early 2022, don’t recall).

    but that doesn’t explain how they ruined their country after 1991
     
    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West. This was when the country fell behind. The reason for this was the Donbas electorate which held Ukraine back. Well, Putin has punished them severely for this. Despite what they had done, they didn’t deserve such cruelty but such is the nature of being next to Russia and being a Russian friend.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @LatW, @Beckow

    …Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.

    So according to you Porky, Timoshenko and the endless oligarchs on Maidan never stole anything? That’s why we think of you as a bit retarded, keep it up.

    “Evidence”? Can you put 2 and 2 together? Zelko’s sponsor Kolomoisky is in jail for a few hundred million he swiped, defense minister was caught red-handed and resigned, Porky and the Kiev “better people” are shopping London, Vienna, Geneva…like there is no tomorrow…buying palaces in Florida. Enough?

    40 billion in cash was sent with no audit – US Congress words, not mine…cars with bags of cash stopped on the border, there are videos..do you want a taped confession? Is that your standard every time corruption takes place around the world? (do you work for Biden?)

    Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft

    They have and media mostly ignores it. We are in a war, these things are trifles and the powers in the West ordered that the media focus on winning the war – anything that would undermine the narrative has been put on ice…Wars are best time for corruption, motivation is sky-high: free money, no future in Ukraine, minimal oversight, welcome mat in the West…is that too complicated for you? but we understand that you have a mind of 10-year old (Viva Habsburgs!!!).

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war

    You did couple months ago…with you usual weasel provisos. But ok, if not 10k or 100k (or 300k that I think is exaggerated) – what is your estimate of Ukie casualties in the war? And also, was it worth it? What has it accomplished?

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West.

    Ukraine pledged by the Budapest treaty to be neutral. They first broke that with Yushenko – remember the Orange loser with 5% approval in 2010? – then with Maidan. If you swear neutrality and then try to join Nato, you are by definition in violation of everything – all the lame talk today intentionally leaves that out.

    It was Kiev that first bombed and is still bombing Donbas – their own citizens!!! There are 5 million people there, the losses have been less than 1%, they will survive it. But I suspect they will forever remember what you crazy Galician quasi-Nazis did to them. If they ever make it to Kiev or Lviv, it will be ugly. But you don’t care about them – you even suggested that millions of Russian who have lived in that region that became a part of Ukraine should leave. Quite extraordinary to openly call for what would be a genocide. But you guys are so narcissistic you are unable to see it. “Russians?” Damn, anything can be done to them, no rules apply – right?

    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    So according to you Porky, Timoshenko and the endless oligarchs on Maidan never stole anything
     
    Don’t lie about what I did or didn’t say.

    The Ukrainian economy improved under Poroshenko and Zelensky when they took Ukraine on an unambiguously Western trajectory.

    Evidence”? Can you put 2 and 2 together? Zelko’s sponsor Kolomoisky is in jail for a few hundred million he swiped, defense minister was caught red-handed and resigned, Porky and the Kiev “better people” are shopping London, Vienna, Geneva…like there is no tomorrow
     
    This stuff was happening before the war also. You know that Poroshenko was very rich before 2022, right? But it’s good to see people being arrested. You would prefer for them to be uninvestigated?

    Any evidence that they were stealing 400 million dollars in cash (1% of what was given) from what was given by the West? There were other forms of corruption not involving the Western money, such as collecting bribes for draft dodging.

    Didn’t think so.

    Wars are best time for corruption, motivation is sky-high: free money, no future in Ukraine, minimal oversight, welcome mat in the West…is that too complicated for you

     

    So it should be easy to find evidence of such. And a lot of people would be motivated to dig it up, if it existed.

    But you haven’t. You mentioned the hoax about the Florida mansion. Maybe another hoax about Zelensky’ a wife shopping in Paris? If there was actual evidence you wouldn’t have to repeat those silly and obvious lies.

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war

    You did couple months ago

     

    No I didn’t, liar.

    I estimated 10k deaths (probably lower, possibly more) during the stalled summer offensive in Zaporizhia. Never for the entire war (unless in early 2022 but I don’t recall doing so).

    Ukraine pledged by the Budapest treaty to be neutral

     

    Point out where:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budapest_Memorandum

    Here is the text. No commitment to neutrality, only to non-proliferation of nukes:

    https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%203007/Part/volume-3007-I-52241.pdf

    It was Kiev that first bombed and is still bombing Donbas

     

    It was Moscow that first brought armed men into Ukraine’s territory, creating a response by the government.

    At any rate Putin has killed far more people in Donbas so you have no right to complain about Kiev doing so. And clearly this means that Russia does not really care about killing civilians or saving civilians life. Putin has claimed Kherson, Zaporizhia, and Donbas to be Russia so he has killed and been killing several times more of his own citizens there than Kiev ever did.

    you even suggested that millions of Russian who have lived in that region that became a part of Ukraine should leave

     

    Only if they want, if they find it so intolerable not to have Russian language state secondary schools. They should be free to move. I’ve heard the same from several people in Russia too (and may have heard it first from one of them). Why not just take back those who find it intolerable to live in Ukraine? We take all these Armenians and Tadjiks, but don’t help our own. Give them apartments like are given to Armenians. Not an uncommon idea in Russia.

    But the Russian state chose to kill them and bomb their cities instead. With your support.
  178. @A123
    @Sher Singh

    Was Pontius Pilate Jewish? Nope.
    Were his Roman soldiers Jewish? Nope.
    Jesus was killed by pantheists.

    A key difference is proselytization:
        • Jews were not trying to convert Christians to Judaism.
        • Pagans would try to pull believers away from Christianity.
    The need to place tighter limits on pagans is fairly obvious in terms of survival.


    Other critical difference are population and timing -- in the Empire generally & Rome specifically.

        • How many Jews were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Not many. Those who voluntarily travelled to Rome would likely be well off with a good reason to be there.

    For those in the Eastern Empire, they had been effectively integrated for hundreds of years. Many Jewish leaders actively supported imperial rule, and thus were supported by the empire. How much do you want to bet that the term "especially pious" is not actual piety? It is more likely code. Think patronage. The Empire designates specific senior rabbis to grant limited numbers of exemptions, including their own family members. Bought loyalty is always a bit chancy, but not a bad technique in outlying territories.

        • How many pagans were there at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire? Many. They were often brought back as slaves, after various campaign.

    There was no history of successfully co-opting pagan religious leaders. The last thing the Empire wanted was charismatic opposition leaders appearing within their own borders. Thus breaking paganism was a necessary element for the secular side of the structure. It also served religious leaders in the Empire, as it opened the door to proselytizing and converting former pagans.
    ___

    Ask this better question -- Why wouldn't Christian Emperors protect a well integrated, useful, & non-threatening sect that shared some beliefs, including the Ten Commandments?
    ___

    The weird fetish of blaming "100% of all Jews" for problems never makes any sense. Every religion is plagued by tiny sub groups of the population misbehaving to become powerful. Calling out specific oligarchs is a good idea. But, when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations? It does happen from time to time, but it is not a reliable logical construct for broad application.

    Would a group foul oligarchs who happened to be Sikhs make "100% of all Sikhs" pariahs, responsible for global sin?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Beckow

    …when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations?

    Happens more often than we like to admit. People are always at awe of wealth…

    But let’s focus: the ruling party in Israel has in its programme that Israel includes all land between the sea and Jordan river, it specifically excludes the possibility of a Pali state. They constantly repeat it. There are 7 million Palis in Israel-Palestine – only about 1 1/2 million are citizens. 5.5 million people are effectively colonized, powerless subjects – it can’t stay that way. Israelis through its government exclude the two-state solution. It is a democracy and the people are after few decades responsible – they have voted again and again for it. Netanyahu is their representative.

    If not a two-state, what is your solution? It can’t go on any longer, what do you propose for the 5.5 million Palis living there?

    If you even indirectly start advocating expulsion (“relocation”, “voluntary” departure…) you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    The only other logical alternative is a single state: 7 million Jews and 7 million Palis learn how to live together. That’s where it is heading. All else are ugly hatreds and dreams by fanatics. So own up to either calling for a genocide or accepting a single state. It was Israel that refused the two-state solution.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Beckow

    If you even indirectly start advocating permanent entrapment of non-Palestinian Muslims you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    You can only ignore physical reality for so long. There is only enough fresh water for Gaza to support ~500K. Are you going to genocide 2MM Muslims out of existence by keeping them in containment?
    ___

    Instead of your guaranteed failure option, why not try something that has not been attempted in the last 70 years? Ending the suffering of non-Palestinian religionists via peaceful and voluntary return to their religious homelands, such as Arabia or Persia.

    If a state is required, establishing a New Muslim Palestine on Islamic (not Christian or Jewish) religious lands is a highly practical concept. There would be many details to work out of course.

    Why do you refuse to consider the only peaceful option? Your persistent & repeated calls for genocide are unhelpful.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Beckow

  179. @Mr. XYZ
    An article about life in occupied Melitopol, in the Glorious Russian Reich:

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/06/11/europe/ukraine-life-under-russian-occupation-melitopol-intl-cmd/index.html

    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Gerard1234

    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.

    Just a reminder (shithead) that the Poles fought far more enthusiastically and intensively FOR Nazi Germany from 1939-45, than they did in “resisting” for 2 weeks in September 1939. Huge numbers of Poles fought for Nazi Germany. No real surprise as there was plenty of good will from 1933-39 in addition to the Poles loser/inferiority complex …….as the Nazi government ministers favourite holiday destination was Poland and, of course, Poland was Hitlers most loyal ally from 1933-39

    • Replies: @ShortOnTime
    @Gerard1234

    I'm afraid that I have to correct you here.

    Poles in WW2 resisted Nazi Germany a lot more than they collaborated, at least as much as was possible for a conquered and defeated nation. Armia Krajowa/Home Army and the Polish Communist acts of resistance were real. The August-October 1944 Warsaw Uprising was very real (not to be confused with the Jewish ghetto one).

    There was less enthusiasm for Nazi Germany in Poland than Napoleon in 19th century.

    Anyway, what's more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia. Just an accident or something else? After all, Poland-Russia reconciliation efforts have been completely dead since then, perhaps on purpose ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smolensk_air_disaster

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

  180. Israel is Losing the World – Ukraine Needs Negotiations | Col. Larry Wilkerson

    Zelensky road show. Putin Q & A w/ Larry Johnson (Live)

  181. @Beckow
    @AP


    ...Kuchma, Yanukovich et al, sure.
     
    So according to you Porky, Timoshenko and the endless oligarchs on Maidan never stole anything? That's why we think of you as a bit retarded, keep it up.

    "Evidence"? Can you put 2 and 2 together? Zelko's sponsor Kolomoisky is in jail for a few hundred million he swiped, defense minister was caught red-handed and resigned, Porky and the Kiev "better people" are shopping London, Vienna, Geneva...like there is no tomorrow...buying palaces in Florida. Enough?

    40 billion in cash was sent with no audit - US Congress words, not mine...cars with bags of cash stopped on the border, there are videos..do you want a taped confession? Is that your standard every time corruption takes place around the world? (do you work for Biden?)


    Lots of people and organizations would be highly motivated to prove such theft
     
    They have and media mostly ignores it. We are in a war, these things are trifles and the powers in the West ordered that the media focus on winning the war - anything that would undermine the narrative has been put on ice...Wars are best time for corruption, motivation is sky-high: free money, no future in Ukraine, minimal oversight, welcome mat in the West...is that too complicated for you? but we understand that you have a mind of 10-year old (Viva Habsburgs!!!).

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war
     
    You did couple months ago...with you usual weasel provisos. But ok, if not 10k or 100k (or 300k that I think is exaggerated) - what is your estimate of Ukie casualties in the war? And also, was it worth it? What has it accomplished?

    Ukraine did poorly after 1991 because it didn’t follow the Poles and the Balts westward right away but instead tried neutrality with both East and West.
     
    Ukraine pledged by the Budapest treaty to be neutral. They first broke that with Yushenko - remember the Orange loser with 5% approval in 2010? - then with Maidan. If you swear neutrality and then try to join Nato, you are by definition in violation of everything - all the lame talk today intentionally leaves that out.

    It was Kiev that first bombed and is still bombing Donbas - their own citizens!!! There are 5 million people there, the losses have been less than 1%, they will survive it. But I suspect they will forever remember what you crazy Galician quasi-Nazis did to them. If they ever make it to Kiev or Lviv, it will be ugly. But you don't care about them - you even suggested that millions of Russian who have lived in that region that became a part of Ukraine should leave. Quite extraordinary to openly call for what would be a genocide. But you guys are so narcissistic you are unable to see it. "Russians?" Damn, anything can be done to them, no rules apply - right?

    Replies: @AP

    So according to you Porky, Timoshenko and the endless oligarchs on Maidan never stole anything

    Don’t lie about what I did or didn’t say.

    The Ukrainian economy improved under Poroshenko and Zelensky when they took Ukraine on an unambiguously Western trajectory.

    Evidence”? Can you put 2 and 2 together? Zelko’s sponsor Kolomoisky is in jail for a few hundred million he swiped, defense minister was caught red-handed and resigned, Porky and the Kiev “better people” are shopping London, Vienna, Geneva…like there is no tomorrow

    This stuff was happening before the war also. You know that Poroshenko was very rich before 2022, right? But it’s good to see people being arrested. You would prefer for them to be uninvestigated?

    Any evidence that they were stealing 400 million dollars in cash (1% of what was given) from what was given by the West? There were other forms of corruption not involving the Western money, such as collecting bribes for draft dodging.

    Didn’t think so.

    Wars are best time for corruption, motivation is sky-high: free money, no future in Ukraine, minimal oversight, welcome mat in the West…is that too complicated for you

    So it should be easy to find evidence of such. And a lot of people would be motivated to dig it up, if it existed.

    But you haven’t. You mentioned the hoax about the Florida mansion. Maybe another hoax about Zelensky’ a wife shopping in Paris? If there was actual evidence you wouldn’t have to repeat those silly and obvious lies.

    I never claimed Ukraine lost only 10k soldiers in this war

    You did couple months ago

    No I didn’t, liar.

    I estimated 10k deaths (probably lower, possibly more) during the stalled summer offensive in Zaporizhia. Never for the entire war (unless in early 2022 but I don’t recall doing so).

    Ukraine pledged by the Budapest treaty to be neutral

    Point out where:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budapest_Memorandum

    Here is the text. No commitment to neutrality, only to non-proliferation of nukes:

    https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%203007/Part/volume-3007-I-52241.pdf

    It was Kiev that first bombed and is still bombing Donbas

    It was Moscow that first brought armed men into Ukraine’s territory, creating a response by the government.

    At any rate Putin has killed far more people in Donbas so you have no right to complain about Kiev doing so. And clearly this means that Russia does not really care about killing civilians or saving civilians life. Putin has claimed Kherson, Zaporizhia, and Donbas to be Russia so he has killed and been killing several times more of his own citizens there than Kiev ever did.

    you even suggested that millions of Russian who have lived in that region that became a part of Ukraine should leave

    Only if they want, if they find it so intolerable not to have Russian language state secondary schools. They should be free to move. I’ve heard the same from several people in Russia too (and may have heard it first from one of them). Why not just take back those who find it intolerable to live in Ukraine? We take all these Armenians and Tadjiks, but don’t help our own. Give them apartments like are given to Armenians. Not an uncommon idea in Russia.

    But the Russian state chose to kill them and bomb their cities instead. With your support.

  182. @Beckow
    @A123


    ...when have oligarchs effectively represented their associated populations?
     
    Happens more often than we like to admit. People are always at awe of wealth...

    But let's focus: the ruling party in Israel has in its programme that Israel includes all land between the sea and Jordan river, it specifically excludes the possibility of a Pali state. They constantly repeat it. There are 7 million Palis in Israel-Palestine - only about 1 1/2 million are citizens. 5.5 million people are effectively colonized, powerless subjects - it can't stay that way. Israelis through its government exclude the two-state solution. It is a democracy and the people are after few decades responsible - they have voted again and again for it. Netanyahu is their representative.

    If not a two-state, what is your solution? It can't go on any longer, what do you propose for the 5.5 million Palis living there?

    If you even indirectly start advocating expulsion ("relocation", "voluntary" departure...) you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    The only other logical alternative is a single state: 7 million Jews and 7 million Palis learn how to live together. That's where it is heading. All else are ugly hatreds and dreams by fanatics. So own up to either calling for a genocide or accepting a single state. It was Israel that refused the two-state solution.

    Replies: @A123

    If you even indirectly start advocating permanent entrapment of non-Palestinian Muslims you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    You can only ignore physical reality for so long. There is only enough fresh water for Gaza to support ~500K. Are you going to genocide 2MM Muslims out of existence by keeping them in containment?
    ___

    Instead of your guaranteed failure option, why not try something that has not been attempted in the last 70 years? Ending the suffering of non-Palestinian religionists via peaceful and voluntary return to their religious homelands, such as Arabia or Persia.

    If a state is required, establishing a New Muslim Palestine on Islamic (not Christian or Jewish) religious lands is a highly practical concept. There would be many details to work out of course.

    Why do you refuse to consider the only peaceful option? Your persistent & repeated calls for genocide are unhelpful.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @A123

    You are scraping the intellectual bottom..."many details to work out, of course..."...absurd defense of destroying a nation, of the genocide of Palestinians.

    I explained to you that you are advocating a genocide - there is no such thing as "voluntary" removing 5 million Palis and you know it. And the best you can come up is to argue that by not doing that genocide Israel will be forced to do a more direct genocide and eliminate the Palis where they are.

    Look, you have crossed into inhumanity that is not salvageable - or you play it here. It is today criminal in whatever is the international law, although I am of the view that freedom of speech is absolute so I don't subscribe to it. But based on today's norms and standards you are calling for a genocide of 5 to 7 million Palestinians. It has close to zero chance to succeed - you are wasting time.

    There will be some kind of a one-state, maybe overcrowded, short of water, split down the middle with special rights - but there will be one-state. All that is needed is for the remaining Palis to also be given citizenship. And a new constitution. You can push it out by a few years, even a decade or two, but it is the inevitable outcome of Israel "democratically" rejecting the two-state solution.

    There won't be the genocide-expulsion of Palis you dream about, calm down. It would at this point destroy the whole region.

    Replies: @A123

  183. @LatW
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Thanks, interesting links.


    a lot of Koreans were actually pro-Russia
     
    It's understandable, but they weren't as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    This was the German polyglot who proposed the Korean king to enter in a secret treaty with Russia
     
    Great photo, you can tell the guy was totally into languages and "going native". He's German Prussian, btw, so practically Baltic German, one can say.

    "Möllendorff also advocated that Korea enter into an alliance with the Russian Empire to counterbalance Chinese and Japanese influences on the Korean peninsula." (Wiki)

    Alliance is different than being completely swamped. Hard to say what is more useful here, doing translations or political advisory.


    Here’s a story about how Japan supported Latvian (and Finnish) revolutionaries
     
    Thanks, this was quite an operation, what is fascinating about it is just the sheer geographic span of all these connections and how they trailed and connected towards a common result. Btw, this org, those were not Bolshes, but social democrats of that time, which by today's standards would be a sort of republican or simply people who wanted modernization (which by the European standards of those times just meant basic rights). Also, to stop Russification of local nationalities.

    And the punitive action after 1905 was just insanely brutal (ordered by Nikolai). Executing, whipping to the point where people were crippled for life, torturing, even women. This was done by Tsar's Cossacks that were brought in. When you do that to your subjects, in the 20th century, you should know it's over. Although there was both good and bad in the Empire.

    And, btw, the modern Latvians (and Estonians) themselves do not like addressing this at all - burning the German estates is really looked down upon, as a shameful piece of history, anything openly anti-German is a big "no no" these days, so very different from those times. But once you start educating them, they start having sympathy for those folks who lived a 100 years ago.

    It is good to be able to look at those times with the distance we have now.

    From what I understand, Japan's collaboration with the Poles was deeper but it's interesting to see that it even reached Finns and Latvians. I'm sure a lot can be found in the revolutionary letters and diaries and such.

    Btw, there is a map that shows the route of the ships that went from Latvia towards Japan (the route is Liepaja to Vladivostok), all the way around Africa. I don't know how to post the map but if you open this link and scroll down, in the middle of the article you'll see three maps, and one of them shows it (the smaller one) - a red line that goes through the Suez canal and towards Asia. 30 warships and 25 cargo ships. They were insane.

    You can see it in this link:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/skirklis/64752-Krievijas%E2%80%93Jap%C4%81nas-kar%C5%A1

    Japanese troops in defense positions:

    https://enciklopedija.lv/api/image/original?name=df0390c82195-2986d039-2f42-438f-8173-1746c0e0ee19.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    It’s understandable, but they weren’t as pro-Russia as to actually want to be part of the Empire, were they?

    No, they tried to enter into some secret agreements with Russia. And the Korean king representing a faction took refuge with Russians

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gojong%27s_internal_exile_to_the_Russian_legation

    It was complicated because Joseon was a Manchu Qing tributary at the time. Qing preferred to keep Joseon static and backwards, this is a depiction of the yangban elite class sitting on top of peasants But Manchu-Mongol rule was crumbling, Han Chinese were dominating the Qing court. Japan and Russia were rising as two great powers of NE Asia. So both Koreans and Chinese were playing off between the two.

    The Han Chinese PM of Qing also entered into a secret backdoor deal with Russia, then turned around and pleaded to Japan to remove Russia from Manchuria

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li–Lobanov_Treaty

    Nicholaus refusing Korea-Manchuria exchange was one of the fateful turning points of 20th CE. No Russo-Japanese War means probably no Bolsheviks, no Nazis, etc…But there was a lot of money involved with timber, Yul Brynner’s grandfather was involved
    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Бринер,_Юлий_Иванович

    [MORE]

    You do “right click”->”copy image link”

  184. @AP
    @Mikel


    However, you may have been too quick to accept AP’s idea that the US is not really spending so much on Ukraine after all
     
    Is much of the $75 billion or whatever in the form of equipment rather than cash? Yes or no?

    And if so, is it incorrect to state that we are sending $75 billion or whatever to Ukraine that could have been spent here?

    Try to be to honest, it’s hard for you in an argument, but do your best.

    And since a lot of the equipment consists of decades-old vehicles that were already paid for when they were made, the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    If Ukraine gets old Bradleys that have been sitting in a warehouse, that the government paid $200 million dollars for when they were made decades ago, no-one is paying that now. We are only paying for transport, but that cost is balanced by us no longer paying for storage and maintenance. But it’s counted as Ukraine getting $200 million dollars worth of Bradleys. And some dishonest guy like your beloved Matt Gaetz will count that as $200 million dollars cash sent to Ukraine that could have fed impoverished Americans, in order to attack the Biden administration and smart centrist Republicans who see this as good policy.

    On the one hand, it implies that the Biden Administration could send much lower appropriations requests to Congress by just using a more accurate accounting method with all those depreciated stocks
     
    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting. It reflects how much the equipment cost when it was made, which they have purchase orders and receipts for. It’s inflated relative to how much it is worth now, but not relative to how much it cost when the Pentagon originally bought it (I am not sure if they use inflation adjustments). Like donating an old unused TV that someone paid $500 for 10 years ago, and having the receipt for that amount. When in reality such a TV would probably be worth $100 if someone tried to sell it today on eBay.

    but for some strange reason prefers to inflate the numbers and make the requests even more unlikely to succeed
     
    Back when there was bipartisan support (in part because the people involved probably understand what I am saying) a high number didn’t matter because everyone was in favor. Perhaps it even was good because it demonstrated a high level of commitment to the world and made it look like the USA was far more supportive than others. It later became a liability when bad actors chose to dishonestly present those numbers as taxpayer dollars being sent abroad.

    It would be funny if the standard accounting practice is abandoned and lower figures are used in the future, without changing the amount of equipment actually being sent to Ukraine. And this would then be successfully sold as “cutting costs.” The higher figures used before will have thus enabled more flexibility later.

    On the other hand, it doesn’t even matter. Once Congress approves an appropriations bill it adds to the existing deficit that needs to be compensated either through increased taxes or through increased debt

     

    How does exaggerating the current value of equipment that has already been paid for long ago, add to the deficit? Nobody is buying the equipment at the exaggerated price.

    Of course that is not the only things that we are sending to Ukraine. Ukraine is also getting a lot of ammo, which indeed is being produced and paid for now:

    In other words, some 1% of Americans working in the defense sector get richer with a part of those huge aid packages by virtue of Biden taking money out of the pockets of most of us here in this blog

     

    This pertains not to sending old equipment, but to sending Ukraine modern ammo such as artillery shells.

    1. Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money. Certainly better than welfare, left-wing NPR propagandists, etc. It helps keep this sector alive, which could be vitally important down the road. We are increasing shell production capacity, which is also a good thing. We are economically helping parts of the country outside the coasts.

    2. In some cases we are sending equipment to Ukraine and then replacing it with newer and better equipment. It’s a process of modernising and improving America’s military. Also a good thing.

    You can argue that we shouldn’t do such things - maybe you feel that America should have a small and weak military, so as not to be tempted to ever go beyond the borders - but don’t pretend that America can’t benefit from it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Mikel

    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds. There is no such thing as getting a supplemental appropriations bill approved without adding to the deficit. Period. Technically speaking, I guess the bill adds to the deficit when the government actually uses the Treasury to allocate the funds but that’s what the bill does: allow the executive to use the Treasury for the requested purpose.

    I’m not going to repeat how an increased deficit is paid for. If you don’t know that, any further discussion is a total waste of time.

    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting.

    I don’t know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent. That is the real standard way of accounting. If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all. And that’s just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.

    Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money.

    Not for those workers and their employers certainly. For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad. We would all choose better uses for the part of that money that comes from our pockets, if given the chance. If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy and we’d all be much richer. Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before you?

    Try to be to honest

    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer. And while doing it tries to make people here believe that the constitutional and national accounting processes have stopped working as usual or that new brave economic theories have started to come into effect. It is actually you who is doing all those ridiculous claims.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mikel


    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before you?
     
    They have and some societies even implemented it. It always ends in a monetary collapse, but it can take a long time. That's what they are counting on.

    Any "debt" is a claim on the same asset or anything of value by two parties. These days often by three or more. As long as the debt is serviced with interest payments it works fine. But it is an economic chimera - two people think that they own something, but it is the same thing. As it happens and grows it is a lot of fun, almost magical, like a society-wide pyramid scheme.

    Once a society discovers the magic of debt it is addictive. That's where US and EU are today. But mathematically it reaches the point where the magic turns into a nightmare - 2023 is the first year US has paid 1 trillion dollars only in the interest on its debt.

    Compared to these huge sums the money for Ukraine is chomp change, it gets lost in the accounting. EU has just proposed giving Kiev 17 billion euros in 3-years 2024-27 - plus co-signing on 33 billion in private bonds - I am not sure it will work, the interest rate will have to be very high and default is very likely, but whatever, this is Brussels.

    It is a fraction of what EU gave to Kiev in 2022-23, around 1/5. It looks like the money will be there, but a lot less of it. This is the usual end-game: giving money so the previous loans can be serviced for a few more years. The last trick when the gig is up.

    Replies: @Mikel

    , @AP
    @Mikel


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.
     

    No, it's not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    Taxpayers are paying to have it shipped to Ukraine; but that cost is offset by what it would have cost to keep maintaining the old vehicles and/or to decommission them and dispose of them.


    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds.
     
    And those additional funds aren't accounted for by that equipment.

    I don’t know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent.... If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all.
     
    Bingo.

    So what it seems we are really doing, is paying for new equipment to replace the old and obsolete stuff being sent to Ukraine (which is still better than the old Soviet equipment the Ukrainians and Russians are using). Those billions of dollars aren't being used to buy 30 year old Bradleys being sent to Ukraine (those were purchased decades ago) . They are allocated to replace them with new vehicles for the US military.

    Same with many of the missiles. America was sending older ones nearing or even exceeding their service life, and replacing them with new ones for itself.

    So this part of the Ukraine aid package supposedly spent "on Ukraine" is actually spent "on the USA."

    Do you oppose the US massively upgrading its military, and replacing expiring missiles, while sending the old stock to Ukraine to use to defend itself?


    And that’s just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.
     
    It was around 31%.

    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.


    Paying American workers in the defense sector is not a bad use of money.

    Not for those workers and their employers certainly.
     

    And also for the communities where those workers live and spend their money.

    For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad
     
    Is it? Many people think that maintaining a healthy defense industry with high production capacity is a very good thing.

    If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy
     
    Or maybe the pure market is more efficient for most economic sectors but not for the defense industry (as also not for the police, corrections, etc.). At least as long as the military and its industry don't maintain self-sufficiency by pillaging other countries. You obviously and for very good reason don't have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.

    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer
     
    The Ukraine war is a tiny fraction of the defense budget, and much of it consists of upgrading the US's own military.

    Speaking of which, I am not sure, but I suspect more of us American taxpayers support helping Ukraine and a greater share of freeloaders oppose doing so.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2023/05/10/americans-hold-positive-feelings-toward-nato-and-ukraine-see-russia-as-an-enemy/

    "Americans who negatively rate the economic situation and indicate dissatisfaction with the way democracy works in the U.S. are more likely to believe the country should concentrate on issues at home. Americans with lower incomes are also more likely than their middle- or upper-income counterparts to say that the U.S. should focus on domestic issues."

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

  185. @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    Your words not mine. I said I haven't paid attention to Avdiika or most other battles. I did say there are lots of causalities on both sides. I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement. Your mileage may vary.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Your words not mine.

    Well you made this comment:

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses.

    I haven’t seen evidence of massive Ukrainian losses anywhere in the last two months. Practically all of the fighting has been in a single area. The Russians have been on the offensive as Putin is clearly trying to take Avdiivka under some type of time or political pressure.

    I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement.

    I see no reason to assume that the Ukrainians have higher casualties unless you are ignoring Wagner’s losses. Even in that case I would be skeptical.

    I would at the very least expect Russia to have a higher kill / casualty loss ratio as they clearly don’t value their conscripts and have medical shortages. Meaning Putin would prefer them to die in a ditch rather than come back and tie up a hospital bed.

    It’s possible that Ukrainians have a higher casualty count overall but I don’t see strong evidence either way. As I said before we will probably never know the actual Russian casualty count as there is widespread evidence that Russia has sent conscripts off the books. Wives are having to send their husbands food so I think rumors of Russia trying to avoid payment for service are most likely true.

    In fact when the war is over I’m sure we will hear stories from Russian doctors on how they put down patients like dogs. A Belarusian doctor who escaped after the invasion described Russians literally dropping off the dying outside the doors of the hospital. The Russians had completely underestimated the Ukrainians and were not prepared for mass casualties. He had to sneak out with his family as he was understandably afraid of being a threat for knowing too much.

    I bet it will come out that they were putting down quadriplegics and similar cases. There are drone videos in fact of Russians shooting their wounded. It will be just like Nazi Germany where they decide that certain veterans are to be given the “mercy bullet” as the Germans called it.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @John Johnson

    I did not mean to imply the map video had anything to do with Avdiivka, merely that it was the most recent video I had skimmed which showed losses on both sides.

    The long range missile strikes are more interesting except that no credible accounting of hits per strike are available. This information may not be available.

    I came across some mention of the destruction of a Patriot battery the other day, no confirmation so far.

    Wait and see.

  186. @A123
    @Beckow

    If you even indirectly start advocating permanent entrapment of non-Palestinian Muslims you are proposing a genocide. That is a crime. Is that what you want?

    You can only ignore physical reality for so long. There is only enough fresh water for Gaza to support ~500K. Are you going to genocide 2MM Muslims out of existence by keeping them in containment?
    ___

    Instead of your guaranteed failure option, why not try something that has not been attempted in the last 70 years? Ending the suffering of non-Palestinian religionists via peaceful and voluntary return to their religious homelands, such as Arabia or Persia.

    If a state is required, establishing a New Muslim Palestine on Islamic (not Christian or Jewish) religious lands is a highly practical concept. There would be many details to work out of course.

    Why do you refuse to consider the only peaceful option? Your persistent & repeated calls for genocide are unhelpful.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Beckow

    You are scraping the intellectual bottom…”many details to work out, of course…“…absurd defense of destroying a nation, of the genocide of Palestinians.

    I explained to you that you are advocating a genocide – there is no such thing as “voluntary” removing 5 million Palis and you know it. And the best you can come up is to argue that by not doing that genocide Israel will be forced to do a more direct genocide and eliminate the Palis where they are.

    Look, you have crossed into inhumanity that is not salvageable – or you play it here. It is today criminal in whatever is the international law, although I am of the view that freedom of speech is absolute so I don’t subscribe to it. But based on today’s norms and standards you are calling for a genocide of 5 to 7 million Palestinians. It has close to zero chance to succeed – you are wasting time.

    There will be some kind of a one-state, maybe overcrowded, short of water, split down the middle with special rights – but there will be one-state. All that is needed is for the remaining Palis to also be given citizenship. And a new constitution. You can push it out by a few years, even a decade or two, but it is the inevitable outcome of Israel “democratically” rejecting the two-state solution.

    There won’t be the genocide-expulsion of Palis you dream about, calm down. It would at this point destroy the whole region.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Beckow

    You are scraping the intellectual bottom… Palestine was never a nation, therefore the nation of Palestine cannot be wiped out.

    I explained to you that you are advocating a genocide – you insist on keeping 2.5MM people where there is only fresh water for about ~500K. Your call to genocide 2MM Muslim colonists occupying Gaza is a crime. Why would you want that?

    You have crossed into inhumanity that is not salvageable -- VOLUNTARY movement is obviously not a crime. Your pathetic & blatant mislabelling has failed. Please, stop lying.

    Israel is an explicitly Jewish nation at this point. Indigenous Palestinian Jews will never sign up to your genocidal one state solution. It is so ludicrous, you cannot possibly believe that your genocidal proposal could ever come to be. It is worse than impossible, it is laughable.

    There won’t be the genocide-containment of 2MM Muslim colonists in Gaza you dream about, calm down. An orderly "Right of Religious Return" functioning over more than a decade is the legal, moral, peaceful, and obvious non-genocidal solution. That could be assimilation into existing Arab and Persian nations and/or the creation of the first Muslim Palestine nation.

    Why do you keep insisting on genocide when there are better options?

    PEACE 😇

  187. @Mikel
    @AP


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.
     
    Of course it's all being paid by us taxpayers.

    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds. There is no such thing as getting a supplemental appropriations bill approved without adding to the deficit. Period. Technically speaking, I guess the bill adds to the deficit when the government actually uses the Treasury to allocate the funds but that's what the bill does: allow the executive to use the Treasury for the requested purpose.

    I'm not going to repeat how an increased deficit is paid for. If you don't know that, any further discussion is a total waste of time.

    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting.
     
    I don't know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent. That is the real standard way of accounting. If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all. And that's just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.

    Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money.
     
    Not for those workers and their employers certainly. For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad. We would all choose better uses for the part of that money that comes from our pockets, if given the chance. If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy and we'd all be much richer. Why hasn't anyone thought of that before you?

    Try to be to honest
     
    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer. And while doing it tries to make people here believe that the constitutional and national accounting processes have stopped working as usual or that new brave economic theories have started to come into effect. It is actually you who is doing all those ridiculous claims.

    Replies: @Beckow, @AP

    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before you?

    They have and some societies even implemented it. It always ends in a monetary collapse, but it can take a long time. That’s what they are counting on.

    Any “debt” is a claim on the same asset or anything of value by two parties. These days often by three or more. As long as the debt is serviced with interest payments it works fine. But it is an economic chimera – two people think that they own something, but it is the same thing. As it happens and grows it is a lot of fun, almost magical, like a society-wide pyramid scheme.

    Once a society discovers the magic of debt it is addictive. That’s where US and EU are today. But mathematically it reaches the point where the magic turns into a nightmare – 2023 is the first year US has paid 1 trillion dollars only in the interest on its debt.

    Compared to these huge sums the money for Ukraine is chomp change, it gets lost in the accounting. EU has just proposed giving Kiev 17 billion euros in 3-years 2024-27 – plus co-signing on 33 billion in private bonds – I am not sure it will work, the interest rate will have to be very high and default is very likely, but whatever, this is Brussels.

    It is a fraction of what EU gave to Kiev in 2022-23, around 1/5. It looks like the money will be there, but a lot less of it. This is the usual end-game: giving money so the previous loans can be serviced for a few more years. The last trick when the gig is up.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @Beckow

    I wouldn't use that definition of debt but yes, the experiment that the advanced economies are running since the Great Recession has no precedents in its magnitude and the precedents that exist are not good, except for maybe the huge post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation. We'll see.

    Replies: @Beckow

  188. @Beckow
    @A123

    You are scraping the intellectual bottom..."many details to work out, of course..."...absurd defense of destroying a nation, of the genocide of Palestinians.

    I explained to you that you are advocating a genocide - there is no such thing as "voluntary" removing 5 million Palis and you know it. And the best you can come up is to argue that by not doing that genocide Israel will be forced to do a more direct genocide and eliminate the Palis where they are.

    Look, you have crossed into inhumanity that is not salvageable - or you play it here. It is today criminal in whatever is the international law, although I am of the view that freedom of speech is absolute so I don't subscribe to it. But based on today's norms and standards you are calling for a genocide of 5 to 7 million Palestinians. It has close to zero chance to succeed - you are wasting time.

    There will be some kind of a one-state, maybe overcrowded, short of water, split down the middle with special rights - but there will be one-state. All that is needed is for the remaining Palis to also be given citizenship. And a new constitution. You can push it out by a few years, even a decade or two, but it is the inevitable outcome of Israel "democratically" rejecting the two-state solution.

    There won't be the genocide-expulsion of Palis you dream about, calm down. It would at this point destroy the whole region.

    Replies: @A123

    You are scraping the intellectual bottom… Palestine was never a nation, therefore the nation of Palestine cannot be wiped out.

    I explained to you that you are advocating a genocide – you insist on keeping 2.5MM people where there is only fresh water for about ~500K. Your call to genocide 2MM Muslim colonists occupying Gaza is a crime. Why would you want that?

    You have crossed into inhumanity that is not salvageable — VOLUNTARY movement is obviously not a crime. Your pathetic & blatant mislabelling has failed. Please, stop lying.

    Israel is an explicitly Jewish nation at this point. Indigenous Palestinian Jews will never sign up to your genocidal one state solution. It is so ludicrous, you cannot possibly believe that your genocidal proposal could ever come to be. It is worse than impossible, it is laughable.

    There won’t be the genocide-containment of 2MM Muslim colonists in Gaza you dream about, calm down. An orderly “Right of Religious Return” functioning over more than a decade is the legal, moral, peaceful, and obvious non-genocidal solution. That could be assimilation into existing Arab and Persian nations and/or the creation of the first Muslim Palestine nation.

    Why do you keep insisting on genocide when there are better options?

    PEACE 😇

  189. @John Johnson
    @QCIC

    Your words not mine.

    Well you made this comment:

    I don’t keep up with the details of the combat such as Avdiivka. The last “map” video I clicked on showed serious Russian losses and massive Ukrainian losses.

    I haven't seen evidence of massive Ukrainian losses anywhere in the last two months. Practically all of the fighting has been in a single area. The Russians have been on the offensive as Putin is clearly trying to take Avdiivka under some type of time or political pressure.

    I appraise the total casualties (KIA) to be much higher on the Ukraine side, but not necessarily so in a particular battle or engagement.

    I see no reason to assume that the Ukrainians have higher casualties unless you are ignoring Wagner's losses. Even in that case I would be skeptical.

    I would at the very least expect Russia to have a higher kill / casualty loss ratio as they clearly don't value their conscripts and have medical shortages. Meaning Putin would prefer them to die in a ditch rather than come back and tie up a hospital bed.

    It's possible that Ukrainians have a higher casualty count overall but I don't see strong evidence either way. As I said before we will probably never know the actual Russian casualty count as there is widespread evidence that Russia has sent conscripts off the books. Wives are having to send their husbands food so I think rumors of Russia trying to avoid payment for service are most likely true.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDfLpwafGSc

    In fact when the war is over I'm sure we will hear stories from Russian doctors on how they put down patients like dogs. A Belarusian doctor who escaped after the invasion described Russians literally dropping off the dying outside the doors of the hospital. The Russians had completely underestimated the Ukrainians and were not prepared for mass casualties. He had to sneak out with his family as he was understandably afraid of being a threat for knowing too much.

    I bet it will come out that they were putting down quadriplegics and similar cases. There are drone videos in fact of Russians shooting their wounded. It will be just like Nazi Germany where they decide that certain veterans are to be given the "mercy bullet" as the Germans called it.

    Replies: @QCIC

    I did not mean to imply the map video had anything to do with Avdiivka, merely that it was the most recent video I had skimmed which showed losses on both sides.

    The long range missile strikes are more interesting except that no credible accounting of hits per strike are available. This information may not be available.

    I came across some mention of the destruction of a Patriot battery the other day, no confirmation so far.

    Wait and see.

  190. Russians stand in line for eggs:
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1841499/Russia-Vladimir-Putin-inflation-economy-war

    And back to USSR style lines for the basics.

    Interesting video:

    From cook to stormtrooper in one day

    That’s one hell of a promotion. Not sure what these Ruskies are complaining about.

    • Replies: @Derer
    @John Johnson

    Johnny, you are getting more and more agitated and nervous, signalling the Ukie defeat is near.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Mr. Hack
    @John Johnson


    Not sure what these Ruskies are complaining about.
     
    I'm guessing that the 5k bonus that's been promised is being delayed in the mail somewhere (Christmas mail is always slow this time of year). It couldn't be that these hapless Russian idiots have only now figured out that they're only being sent into Ukraine to become cannon fodder?

    https://image.cagle.com/267345/750/267345.png

  191. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    I don't know about "memo", but it's certainly to be seen in Adviivka. Why don't you take your sword out of mothballs and enlist in Putler's army and you can see for yourself first hand? I hear that that they're offering a 5k bonus right now for new conscripts.

    https://central.asia-news.com/cnmi_ca/images/2023/01/26/40456-mobilization_1-739_416.webp
    A fine example of Putler's savvy marketing department, designed to attract patriots like you and Professor Janissary to join and help the cause...soldiers of fortune like kremlinstoogeA123 are welcome too.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    You are so fucking wierd m’dude.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f2/27/be/f227bec343be864ea7d21a83d6cc41ec.png

    You're right. I'm not crazy about you either, so why don't you quit following me around here at this blogsite? What's the matter, don't you have any other buddies here you can hang out with?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  192. @Beckow
    @Mikel


    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before you?
     
    They have and some societies even implemented it. It always ends in a monetary collapse, but it can take a long time. That's what they are counting on.

    Any "debt" is a claim on the same asset or anything of value by two parties. These days often by three or more. As long as the debt is serviced with interest payments it works fine. But it is an economic chimera - two people think that they own something, but it is the same thing. As it happens and grows it is a lot of fun, almost magical, like a society-wide pyramid scheme.

    Once a society discovers the magic of debt it is addictive. That's where US and EU are today. But mathematically it reaches the point where the magic turns into a nightmare - 2023 is the first year US has paid 1 trillion dollars only in the interest on its debt.

    Compared to these huge sums the money for Ukraine is chomp change, it gets lost in the accounting. EU has just proposed giving Kiev 17 billion euros in 3-years 2024-27 - plus co-signing on 33 billion in private bonds - I am not sure it will work, the interest rate will have to be very high and default is very likely, but whatever, this is Brussels.

    It is a fraction of what EU gave to Kiev in 2022-23, around 1/5. It looks like the money will be there, but a lot less of it. This is the usual end-game: giving money so the previous loans can be serviced for a few more years. The last trick when the gig is up.

    Replies: @Mikel

    I wouldn’t use that definition of debt but yes, the experiment that the advanced economies are running since the Great Recession has no precedents in its magnitude and the precedents that exist are not good, except for maybe the huge post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation. We’ll see.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mikel

    Sure, there are different ways to describe what debt is - I like the Stone Age-caveman version, it has an immediacy about it that the fancy financial models lack....:)


    post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation.
     
    It worked because of rapidly rising real productivity, and inflation helped too. But the post-WW2 productivity explosion was almost unprecedented. The key was the productivity gains fairly divided among the population - working people were much smarter about their self-interest and the oligarchs ("capitalists"?) were very scared.

    Similar productivity explosion in the last generation with the new technologies was squandered. The gains mostly went to the oligarchs, this time called "enterpreneurs" or "investors". That makes high inflation to get rid of debts impractical - too many people would struggle to survive.

    We are kind of stuck. Thus the woke distractions, security manias, governments run by clowns and old men...or maybe a war? We'll see...

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  193. Does Japan really have 2 of the top 3 slots of NA box office?

    Wow, that’s really amazing if true. I never thought we’d see anything like it, especially with Japan in demographic decline.

    Though I suppose Godzilla is a really old property that’s been promoted big recently by Hollywood itself, and Miyazaki is 82.

  194. @Mikel
    @Beckow

    I wouldn't use that definition of debt but yes, the experiment that the advanced economies are running since the Great Recession has no precedents in its magnitude and the precedents that exist are not good, except for maybe the huge post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation. We'll see.

    Replies: @Beckow

    Sure, there are different ways to describe what debt is – I like the Stone Age-caveman version, it has an immediacy about it that the fancy financial models lack….:)

    post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation.

    It worked because of rapidly rising real productivity, and inflation helped too. But the post-WW2 productivity explosion was almost unprecedented. The key was the productivity gains fairly divided among the population – working people were much smarter about their self-interest and the oligarchs (“capitalists”?) were very scared.

    Similar productivity explosion in the last generation with the new technologies was squandered. The gains mostly went to the oligarchs, this time called “enterpreneurs” or “investors”. That makes high inflation to get rid of debts impractical – too many people would struggle to survive.

    We are kind of stuck. Thus the woke distractions, security manias, governments run by clowns and old men…or maybe a war? We’ll see…

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Beckow


    the oligarchs (or “capitalists”?) were very scared.
     
    They were surrounded by millions of experienced soldiers who were suddenly civilians. There was incentive to occupy these fellows working for money!

    Replies: @Mikel

  195. @Beckow
    @Mikel

    Sure, there are different ways to describe what debt is - I like the Stone Age-caveman version, it has an immediacy about it that the fancy financial models lack....:)


    post-WWII public debt being eliminated through inflation.
     
    It worked because of rapidly rising real productivity, and inflation helped too. But the post-WW2 productivity explosion was almost unprecedented. The key was the productivity gains fairly divided among the population - working people were much smarter about their self-interest and the oligarchs ("capitalists"?) were very scared.

    Similar productivity explosion in the last generation with the new technologies was squandered. The gains mostly went to the oligarchs, this time called "enterpreneurs" or "investors". That makes high inflation to get rid of debts impractical - too many people would struggle to survive.

    We are kind of stuck. Thus the woke distractions, security manias, governments run by clowns and old men...or maybe a war? We'll see...

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    the oligarchs (or “capitalists”?) were very scared.

    They were surrounded by millions of experienced soldiers who were suddenly civilians. There was incentive to occupy these fellows working for money!

    • Agree: Beckow
    • Replies: @Mikel
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Inflation is always hard on the poor and people in the late forties-early fifties were much poorer in the US and Western Europe than today. It must have hit them harder. On the other hand, people today are not as used to hardship as they were then so Beckow's idea that we would have a social explosion if we started having high levels of inflation has some merit but I don't think it would happen. In the past couple of years we've had levels of inflation comparable to the late 40s and people have gotten used to it quite well. The fact that we've grown less accustomed to hardship than previous generations also means that we are quite docile.

    The best scenario for the current insane levels of debt is long years of inflation diluting it. But we'll have to stop adding to that debt at some point too. Supplemental bills of any kind don't help.

    Milei's reforms in Argentina may have some effect on all this. There are people in the Republican Party receptive to the economic ideas he's championing but I'm not sure how important Argentina is these days for 1st World countries to start emulating it, no matter how effective his policies happen to be. Argentina's economy is in such a bad shape and so entangled in an interventionist nightmare at all levels that it will be many years before it can become a free market, fiscal responsibility success story, if it ever gets there. Besides, the first measures Milei has adopted point to a much more pragmatic approach that what he campaigned for.

    Perhaps this is why Ron Paul and other libertarians seem to be ignoring Milei. I was pretty sure he would post a column about his victory in Argentina but I haven't seen any. His chances of success, given the situation he inherits and his personality, are small so why associate the libertarian brand to such a figure?

  196. @Mr. Hack
    @Derer

    And everyone of them would cry bloody murder if the US closed down any base and left. All bases are the source of business opportunities and jobs for the locals. Name even one of these host countries that wants the US to go?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Derer

    Most important is Germany or Japan. Those 50k American soldiers in Germany are not there to protect Germany but to put out any sign of anti-Americanism. Russians left East Germany and unified the nation, while London and Paris objected. Where is the prove of your suggested pathetic hypocrisy?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Derer

    As long as Dumb Dumb, the Russian midget dictator is in power, the bases will remain:

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/jMeVudGMgAY/maxresdefault.jpg

  197. Was there something like the Great Awokening but with bathroom humor?

  198. @John Johnson
    Russians stand in line for eggs:
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1841499/Russia-Vladimir-Putin-inflation-economy-war

    And back to USSR style lines for the basics.

    Interesting video:

    From cook to stormtrooper in one day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1F0Y2T7sww

    That's one hell of a promotion. Not sure what these Ruskies are complaining about.

    Replies: @Derer, @Mr. Hack

    Johnny, you are getting more and more agitated and nervous, signalling the Ukie defeat is near.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Derer

    Johnny, you are getting more and more agitated and nervous, signalling the Ukie defeat is near.

    Posting a video is a sign of agitation?

    I've been posting such videos since the start of the 2.5 week special military operation.

    It's taken just a tad longer than 2.5 weeks.

    My only regret is not buying defense industry stocks. Who knew that the Russian military was this incompetent and would drag out the war while making US defense companies wealthy.

    I'll probably buy myself a car when this is over and my stocks rebound. But you keep telling yourself that I must be anxious.

  199. Credit to Mr. Owen as his 2022 May prediction about eggs in RF was right on the money;)

    Russia self sanctioned food in 2015. So it has large numbers of new factory farms. These are of course designed around the litter frequency, sizes, growth rates, food consumption and weight at maturity of very specific breeds (strains) of organism. There’s the rub. Freshly hatched chicks, breeding sows, bull semen, tomato seedlings are all imported from the EU. Even seed potatoes on the big farms. So eggs, chickens, pork, milk, cheese, beef, salad crops are within the production cycle time limits (6 months to 3 years) going to be a lot more expensive. Substitute breeds, even if usable, will be much less productive. Peasant farmers have been eased out by the big boys.

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-187-russia-ukraine/#comment-5342090

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death

    There is a multinational avian flu issue at egg farms. Here is an update from the U.S.: (1)


    The Kansas Department of Agriculture has identified the highly pathogenic avian influence at two egg layer facilities in Kansas. One of the facilities is in McPherson County, and the other one is in Rice County.

    The KDA says the two facilities increased their biosecurity upon the initial HPAI outbreak in 2022. When the facilities noticed clinical signs of HPAI in their birds, that is when the KDA was contacted

    The egg layer facilities were placed under quarantine, and the birds were humanely depopulated and disposed of in an approved manner to prevent the spread of the disease, according to the KDA.
     
    Similar outbreaks have occurred in several other countries including Japan, Cambodia, and (gasp) Russia;)

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/highly-pathogenic-avian-influenza-found-at-two-kansas-egg-layer-facilities/ar-AA1lpyRV

    Replies: @sudden death

  200. @sudden death
    Credit to Mr. Owen as his 2022 May prediction about eggs in RF was right on the money;)

    Russia self sanctioned food in 2015. So it has large numbers of new factory farms. These are of course designed around the litter frequency, sizes, growth rates, food consumption and weight at maturity of very specific breeds (strains) of organism. There’s the rub. Freshly hatched chicks, breeding sows, bull semen, tomato seedlings are all imported from the EU. Even seed potatoes on the big farms. So eggs, chickens, pork, milk, cheese, beef, salad crops are within the production cycle time limits (6 months to 3 years) going to be a lot more expensive. Substitute breeds, even if usable, will be much less productive. Peasant farmers have been eased out by the big boys.
     
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-187-russia-ukraine/#comment-5342090


    https://twitter.com/MyLordBebo/status/1735395112711229910

    Replies: @A123

    There is a multinational avian flu issue at egg farms. Here is an update from the U.S.: (1)

    The Kansas Department of Agriculture has identified the highly pathogenic avian influence at two egg layer facilities in Kansas. One of the facilities is in McPherson County, and the other one is in Rice County.

    The KDA says the two facilities increased their biosecurity upon the initial HPAI outbreak in 2022. When the facilities noticed clinical signs of HPAI in their birds, that is when the KDA was contacted

    The egg layer facilities were placed under quarantine, and the birds were humanely depopulated and disposed of in an approved manner to prevent the spread of the disease, according to the KDA.

    Similar outbreaks have occurred in several other countries including Japan, Cambodia, and (gasp) Russia;)

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/highly-pathogenic-avian-influenza-found-at-two-kansas-egg-layer-facilities/ar-AA1lpyRV

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    Such HPAI outbreaks are happening almost everywhere, but the notable eggs price crisis has been occuring only in RF lately, while answering Putin himself didn't even mention outbreak as some significant cause, therefore it might have been just additional cumulative clusterfuck in RF on the top of those specific systemic issues mentioned earlier by Mr. Owen;)


    So far this year, there have been 388 outbreaks of HPAI in commercial poultry in 22 European Union (EU) member states and neighboring countries. This is according to the Animal Disease Information System by the European Commission (EC; dated October 13).

    This source includes two areas that are not generally considered to belong to the continent of Europe. As a result, these totals include two outbreaks in Turkey (Tűrkiye) as well as one in the French overseas territory of Reunion, which is located in the western Indian Ocean.

    Since the EC’s previous update on October 6, the first outbreak of 2023 has occurred in Norway, and Poland’s total outbreaks increased by one to 62.

    Of the total, the country with the most outbreaks — 152 — continues to be France, although the number of outbreaks has not increased since July. Next comes Hungary, with 79 outbreaks for the year to date, unchanged since April.

    For comparison, 24 nations registered a total of 2,321 outbreaks in commercial poultry flocks through this system during 2022.
     

    https://www.wattagnet.com/poultry-meat/diseases-health/avian-influenza/article/15637496/commercial-poultry-hit-by-bird-flu-in-bulgaria-russia

    Replies: @A123

  201. ALEX JONES made a retro video game.

    Attack Epstein Island! Get it before it is censored.

    PEACE 😇

  202. @A123
    @sudden death

    There is a multinational avian flu issue at egg farms. Here is an update from the U.S.: (1)


    The Kansas Department of Agriculture has identified the highly pathogenic avian influence at two egg layer facilities in Kansas. One of the facilities is in McPherson County, and the other one is in Rice County.

    The KDA says the two facilities increased their biosecurity upon the initial HPAI outbreak in 2022. When the facilities noticed clinical signs of HPAI in their birds, that is when the KDA was contacted

    The egg layer facilities were placed under quarantine, and the birds were humanely depopulated and disposed of in an approved manner to prevent the spread of the disease, according to the KDA.
     
    Similar outbreaks have occurred in several other countries including Japan, Cambodia, and (gasp) Russia;)

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/highly-pathogenic-avian-influenza-found-at-two-kansas-egg-layer-facilities/ar-AA1lpyRV

    Replies: @sudden death

    Such HPAI outbreaks are happening almost everywhere, but the notable eggs price crisis has been occuring only in RF lately, while answering Putin himself didn’t even mention outbreak as some significant cause, therefore it might have been just additional cumulative clusterfuck in RF on the top of those specific systemic issues mentioned earlier by Mr. Owen;)

    So far this year, there have been 388 outbreaks of HPAI in commercial poultry in 22 European Union (EU) member states and neighboring countries. This is according to the Animal Disease Information System by the European Commission (EC; dated October 13).

    This source includes two areas that are not generally considered to belong to the continent of Europe. As a result, these totals include two outbreaks in Turkey (Tűrkiye) as well as one in the French overseas territory of Reunion, which is located in the western Indian Ocean.

    Since the EC’s previous update on October 6, the first outbreak of 2023 has occurred in Norway, and Poland’s total outbreaks increased by one to 62.

    Of the total, the country with the most outbreaks — 152 — continues to be France, although the number of outbreaks has not increased since July. Next comes Hungary, with 79 outbreaks for the year to date, unchanged since April.

    For comparison, 24 nations registered a total of 2,321 outbreaks in commercial poultry flocks through this system during 2022.

    https://www.wattagnet.com/poultry-meat/diseases-health/avian-influenza/article/15637496/commercial-poultry-hit-by-bird-flu-in-bulgaria-russia

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death

    Your "count by # of farms" concept is obviously flawed -- Countries with fewer but larger farms have more chickens per farm;) Let's look at real world facts:

    Japan has a major egg shortage issue;)

    https://www.efeedlink.com/contents/12-13-2023/a785eef7-e31c-40b7-b1f2-6a16fe7a0c7a-0001.html

    New Zealand is just now escaping theirs;)

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/egg-shortage-supply-just-about-there-as-prices-finally-descend/46VAH3MFSNH7VMA4Y4BWTQXMBU/

    As I previously indicated, the U.S. has a regional egg shortage;) The Kansas containment effort has saved Christmas baking, but their may be a more widespread problem in 1Q2024.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

  203. @sudden death
    @A123

    Such HPAI outbreaks are happening almost everywhere, but the notable eggs price crisis has been occuring only in RF lately, while answering Putin himself didn't even mention outbreak as some significant cause, therefore it might have been just additional cumulative clusterfuck in RF on the top of those specific systemic issues mentioned earlier by Mr. Owen;)


    So far this year, there have been 388 outbreaks of HPAI in commercial poultry in 22 European Union (EU) member states and neighboring countries. This is according to the Animal Disease Information System by the European Commission (EC; dated October 13).

    This source includes two areas that are not generally considered to belong to the continent of Europe. As a result, these totals include two outbreaks in Turkey (Tűrkiye) as well as one in the French overseas territory of Reunion, which is located in the western Indian Ocean.

    Since the EC’s previous update on October 6, the first outbreak of 2023 has occurred in Norway, and Poland’s total outbreaks increased by one to 62.

    Of the total, the country with the most outbreaks — 152 — continues to be France, although the number of outbreaks has not increased since July. Next comes Hungary, with 79 outbreaks for the year to date, unchanged since April.

    For comparison, 24 nations registered a total of 2,321 outbreaks in commercial poultry flocks through this system during 2022.
     

    https://www.wattagnet.com/poultry-meat/diseases-health/avian-influenza/article/15637496/commercial-poultry-hit-by-bird-flu-in-bulgaria-russia

    Replies: @A123

    Your “count by # of farms” concept is obviously flawed — Countries with fewer but larger farms have more chickens per farm;) Let’s look at real world facts:

    Japan has a major egg shortage issue;)

    https://www.efeedlink.com/contents/12-13-2023/a785eef7-e31c-40b7-b1f2-6a16fe7a0c7a-0001.html

    New Zealand is just now escaping theirs;)

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/egg-shortage-supply-just-about-there-as-prices-finally-descend/46VAH3MFSNH7VMA4Y4BWTQXMBU/

    As I previously indicated, the U.S. has a regional egg shortage;) The Kansas containment effort has saved Christmas baking, but their may be a more widespread problem in 1Q2024.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    While Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF, but New Zealand situation had nothing to do with diseases or systemic flaws/vulnerabilities, but mainly just local ban implementation struggles related to battery-caged hens:


    Eggs have been in short supply - and expensive - since the start of the year when a ban on battery-caged hens came into effect, sparking shortages across the country.

    Egg Producers’ Federation executive director Michael Brooks said the layer hen population had grown from 3.4 million in February to 3.8 million - and added there should be another 100,000 more by January.

    Brooks said it had been a “fairly brutal” time for farmers making the costly switch.

    The rising cost of grain, and the decision by Foodstuffs and Woolworths, formerly Countdown, to also ban colony-caged hen’s eggs by 2025, had intensified the situation, he said.

    “It’s been a very tough couple of years for the layer hen farming industry,” Brooks said.

    “There’s been huge financial pressures on farmers ...

    “It was a minimum of $1 million just to change from the old style cage to the colony cage, then if you were going into free range, that meant buying a whole new farm, a new set up. So some really big costs and a lot of investment.

    “All those things had an impact, so it’s led to a pretty messy situation, and it’s taken a while for the supply to bounce back, but it is just about there now.
     

    Replies: @A123

  204. @A123
    @sudden death

    Your "count by # of farms" concept is obviously flawed -- Countries with fewer but larger farms have more chickens per farm;) Let's look at real world facts:

    Japan has a major egg shortage issue;)

    https://www.efeedlink.com/contents/12-13-2023/a785eef7-e31c-40b7-b1f2-6a16fe7a0c7a-0001.html

    New Zealand is just now escaping theirs;)

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/egg-shortage-supply-just-about-there-as-prices-finally-descend/46VAH3MFSNH7VMA4Y4BWTQXMBU/

    As I previously indicated, the U.S. has a regional egg shortage;) The Kansas containment effort has saved Christmas baking, but their may be a more widespread problem in 1Q2024.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

    While Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF, but New Zealand situation had nothing to do with diseases or systemic flaws/vulnerabilities, but mainly just local ban implementation struggles related to battery-caged hens:

    Eggs have been in short supply – and expensive – since the start of the year when a ban on battery-caged hens came into effect, sparking shortages across the country.

    Egg Producers’ Federation executive director Michael Brooks said the layer hen population had grown from 3.4 million in February to 3.8 million – and added there should be another 100,000 more by January.

    Brooks said it had been a “fairly brutal” time for farmers making the costly switch.

    The rising cost of grain, and the decision by Foodstuffs and Woolworths, formerly Countdown, to also ban colony-caged hen’s eggs by 2025, had intensified the situation, he said.

    “It’s been a very tough couple of years for the layer hen farming industry,” Brooks said.

    “There’s been huge financial pressures on farmers …

    “It was a minimum of $1 million just to change from the old style cage to the colony cage, then if you were going into free range, that meant buying a whole new farm, a new set up. So some really big costs and a lot of investment.

    “All those things had an impact, so it’s led to a pretty messy situation, and it’s taken a while for the supply to bounce back, but it is just about there now.

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death


    Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF
     
    You admit the Japan case fits. And, you ignored the U.S. case completely.

    I accept your apology. Thanks.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

  205. @sudden death
    @A123

    While Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF, but New Zealand situation had nothing to do with diseases or systemic flaws/vulnerabilities, but mainly just local ban implementation struggles related to battery-caged hens:


    Eggs have been in short supply - and expensive - since the start of the year when a ban on battery-caged hens came into effect, sparking shortages across the country.

    Egg Producers’ Federation executive director Michael Brooks said the layer hen population had grown from 3.4 million in February to 3.8 million - and added there should be another 100,000 more by January.

    Brooks said it had been a “fairly brutal” time for farmers making the costly switch.

    The rising cost of grain, and the decision by Foodstuffs and Woolworths, formerly Countdown, to also ban colony-caged hen’s eggs by 2025, had intensified the situation, he said.

    “It’s been a very tough couple of years for the layer hen farming industry,” Brooks said.

    “There’s been huge financial pressures on farmers ...

    “It was a minimum of $1 million just to change from the old style cage to the colony cage, then if you were going into free range, that meant buying a whole new farm, a new set up. So some really big costs and a lot of investment.

    “All those things had an impact, so it’s led to a pretty messy situation, and it’s taken a while for the supply to bounce back, but it is just about there now.
     

    Replies: @A123

    Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF

    You admit the Japan case fits. And, you ignored the U.S. case completely.

    I accept your apology. Thanks.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    There is not a single word about any egg shortages regarding US in your own given links, just the occurrence of regional infection outbreak in one state of Kansas atm without any notable wider market consequences so far;)

    Replies: @A123

  206. @Mikel
    @AP


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.
     
    Of course it's all being paid by us taxpayers.

    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds. There is no such thing as getting a supplemental appropriations bill approved without adding to the deficit. Period. Technically speaking, I guess the bill adds to the deficit when the government actually uses the Treasury to allocate the funds but that's what the bill does: allow the executive to use the Treasury for the requested purpose.

    I'm not going to repeat how an increased deficit is paid for. If you don't know that, any further discussion is a total waste of time.

    That seems to just be the standard way of accounting.
     
    I don't know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent. That is the real standard way of accounting. If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all. And that's just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.

    Paying American workers in the defence sector is not a bad use of money.
     
    Not for those workers and their employers certainly. For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad. We would all choose better uses for the part of that money that comes from our pockets, if given the chance. If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy and we'd all be much richer. Why hasn't anyone thought of that before you?

    Try to be to honest
     
    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer. And while doing it tries to make people here believe that the constitutional and national accounting processes have stopped working as usual or that new brave economic theories have started to come into effect. It is actually you who is doing all those ridiculous claims.

    Replies: @Beckow, @AP

    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    Taxpayers are paying to have it shipped to Ukraine; but that cost is offset by what it would have cost to keep maintaining the old vehicles and/or to decommission them and dispose of them.

    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds.

    And those additional funds aren’t accounted for by that equipment.

    I don’t know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent…. If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all.

    Bingo.

    So what it seems we are really doing, is paying for new equipment to replace the old and obsolete stuff being sent to Ukraine (which is still better than the old Soviet equipment the Ukrainians and Russians are using). Those billions of dollars aren’t being used to buy 30 year old Bradleys being sent to Ukraine (those were purchased decades ago) . They are allocated to replace them with new vehicles for the US military.

    Same with many of the missiles. America was sending older ones nearing or even exceeding their service life, and replacing them with new ones for itself.

    So this part of the Ukraine aid package supposedly spent “on Ukraine” is actually spent “on the USA.”

    Do you oppose the US massively upgrading its military, and replacing expiring missiles, while sending the old stock to Ukraine to use to defend itself?

    And that’s just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.

    It was around 31%.

    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.

    Paying American workers in the defense sector is not a bad use of money.

    Not for those workers and their employers certainly.

    And also for the communities where those workers live and spend their money.

    For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad

    Is it? Many people think that maintaining a healthy defense industry with high production capacity is a very good thing.

    If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy

    Or maybe the pure market is more efficient for most economic sectors but not for the defense industry (as also not for the police, corrections, etc.). At least as long as the military and its industry don’t maintain self-sufficiency by pillaging other countries. You obviously and for very good reason don’t have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.

    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer

    The Ukraine war is a tiny fraction of the defense budget, and much of it consists of upgrading the US’s own military.

    Speaking of which, I am not sure, but I suspect more of us American taxpayers support helping Ukraine and a greater share of freeloaders oppose doing so.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2023/05/10/americans-hold-positive-feelings-toward-nato-and-ukraine-see-russia-as-an-enemy/

    “Americans who negatively rate the economic situation and indicate dissatisfaction with the way democracy works in the U.S. are more likely to believe the country should concentrate on issues at home. Americans with lower incomes are also more likely than their middle- or upper-income counterparts to say that the U.S. should focus on domestic issues.”

    • Replies: @AP
    @AP


    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.
     
    By some of Ukraine's detractors, who claim all the aid is cash being given to Ukraine. Not the article.

    (missed the editing window)
    , @Mikel
    @AP


    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?
     
    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers. That is in fact a good part of the reason why the fiscal conservative side of the GOP opposes this bill.

    Just because you refuse to accept the obvious I'm not going to repeat myself like a parrot. Anyone else here apart from you who disagrees is welcome to challenge my point but otherwise the matter is more than settled.

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not) is also a very poor use of my time. Economic theory is not this blog's forte. And we all know that you don't support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway :-)


    You obviously and for very good reason don’t have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.
     
    Not really. What I support is walling and fencing the border as required to stem illegal immigration (which is not at all what Biden is requesting funds for). And I do that precisely because, once the project was complete, it would save lots of taxpayers dollars in al sorts of costs directly associated to the illegal invasion and it would save us even more in the long term in many other types of costs. MAGA is an improvement over the Tea Party movement but there is plenty of common ground between both.

    Replies: @AP

  207. @AP
    @Mikel


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.
     

    No, it's not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    Taxpayers are paying to have it shipped to Ukraine; but that cost is offset by what it would have cost to keep maintaining the old vehicles and/or to decommission them and dispose of them.


    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds.
     
    And those additional funds aren't accounted for by that equipment.

    I don’t know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent.... If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all.
     
    Bingo.

    So what it seems we are really doing, is paying for new equipment to replace the old and obsolete stuff being sent to Ukraine (which is still better than the old Soviet equipment the Ukrainians and Russians are using). Those billions of dollars aren't being used to buy 30 year old Bradleys being sent to Ukraine (those were purchased decades ago) . They are allocated to replace them with new vehicles for the US military.

    Same with many of the missiles. America was sending older ones nearing or even exceeding their service life, and replacing them with new ones for itself.

    So this part of the Ukraine aid package supposedly spent "on Ukraine" is actually spent "on the USA."

    Do you oppose the US massively upgrading its military, and replacing expiring missiles, while sending the old stock to Ukraine to use to defend itself?


    And that’s just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.
     
    It was around 31%.

    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.


    Paying American workers in the defense sector is not a bad use of money.

    Not for those workers and their employers certainly.
     

    And also for the communities where those workers live and spend their money.

    For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad
     
    Is it? Many people think that maintaining a healthy defense industry with high production capacity is a very good thing.

    If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy
     
    Or maybe the pure market is more efficient for most economic sectors but not for the defense industry (as also not for the police, corrections, etc.). At least as long as the military and its industry don't maintain self-sufficiency by pillaging other countries. You obviously and for very good reason don't have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.

    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer
     
    The Ukraine war is a tiny fraction of the defense budget, and much of it consists of upgrading the US's own military.

    Speaking of which, I am not sure, but I suspect more of us American taxpayers support helping Ukraine and a greater share of freeloaders oppose doing so.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2023/05/10/americans-hold-positive-feelings-toward-nato-and-ukraine-see-russia-as-an-enemy/

    "Americans who negatively rate the economic situation and indicate dissatisfaction with the way democracy works in the U.S. are more likely to believe the country should concentrate on issues at home. Americans with lower incomes are also more likely than their middle- or upper-income counterparts to say that the U.S. should focus on domestic issues."

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.

    By some of Ukraine’s detractors, who claim all the aid is cash being given to Ukraine. Not the article.

    (missed the editing window)

  208. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    You are so fucking wierd m’dude.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack


    You’re right. I’m not crazy about you either, so why don’t you quit following me around here at this blogsite? What’s the matter, don’t you have any other buddies here you can hang out with?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Mr. Hack

    Hacky wants the thread to be him and John Johnson, with the occasional meamjojo ;-)

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/12/13/ukraine-aid-united-states-european-union/


    An unspoken, unspeakable potential endgame in the Russia-Ukraine war is suddenly being uttered out loud: Kyiv is at risk of losing — and suffering unimaginable carnage and consequences.

    Andriy Yermak, a top aide to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, told a Washington forum last week that the “big risk” is that Kyiv’s troops could “lose this war.”

    That message should jolt policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. The danger, as Ukraine’s top general warned publicly last month, isn’t simply stalemate. It is that Ukrainian forces, running low on equipment, might be compelled to fall back, shorten their defensive lines and abandon territory.
    “It would be a way back to the darkest times of the war,” Nico Lange, a German security expert on Ukraine, told me.

    It’s essential to think about what Ukraine’s defeat means, because it would be as much a strategic disaster for the United States and its NATO allies as a tableau of terror for Ukraine. Dual cataclysms, equally stark, played out on different timetables.

    A complete Ukrainian military collapse is unlikely, at least in coming months. Kyiv’s armed forces remain well-led and motivated, and they are husbanding equipment to prepare for shortfalls. But it is equally unlikely to expect a negotiated cease-fire with Russia that would maintain existing battle lines. To believe in that seemingly anodyne outcome is to misjudge Putin — again.

    For the Kremlin dictator, a “compromise” would involve Ukraine’s subjugation and dissolution as an independent state. That would include regime change, with Zelensky in exile (or dead), as well as an end to Kyiv’s aspirations to join the E.U. or NATO.

     

    I don't think joining the EU was a problem back in 2014 or 2021. It might be now.

    Ukraine in NATO has always been a red line, as now-CIA boss Bill Burns pointed out 15 years ago. What would the US do if Canada or Mexico chose to host Chinese missiles?

    “NATO enlargement, particularly to Ukraine, remains “an emotional and neuralgic issue” for Russia, but strategic policy considerations also underlie strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine and Georgia. In Ukraine, these include fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence, or, some claim, even civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene.

     

    Which is precisely what happened.

    To be fair to the author, what we're actually reading is "Ukraine will lose UNLESS the US and Europe dig deep and send loads more money and weapons".

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Emil Nikola Richard

  209. @Derer
    @Mr. Hack

    Most important is Germany or Japan. Those 50k American soldiers in Germany are not there to protect Germany but to put out any sign of anti-Americanism. Russians left East Germany and unified the nation, while London and Paris objected. Where is the prove of your suggested pathetic hypocrisy?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    As long as Dumb Dumb, the Russian midget dictator is in power, the bases will remain:

  210. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I recently re-watched the Sam Bankman Fried presentation on Bankless. It was four days before Coindesk spilled the beans on the FTX books and six days before CZ did the demolition job. I couldn't get much past the 30 minute mark but it is perhaps one of the ten all time internet hits so far. Aye aye aye aye aye aye aye.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ytaa_5liwMA

    He is going to be locked up for a long time but they haven't done the sentence yet.

    Replies: @Sean

    Scam Bankrun-Fraud openly gave huge sums to the Dems, and secretly gave a similar amount to the Republicans. He was also covertly holding down the market price of Bitcoin (and maybe was not the only one because quite possibly there is someone still doing it).

    You can’t really deter someone like SBF who though it seems illogical had to be hugely important even in the scale of the disaster he’d cause. Stockton Rush the boss of the submarine that was destroyed on a trip to see the wreck of the Titanic was similar. They both absolutely knew how it would end.

    He didn’t get offered a plea bargain so they were forcing him to go to trial and the only intention of that was to make plead not guilty all the better to make an example of him the original soft hearted judge dropped out because of a conflict of interest with her husbands firm doing work for SBF’s company and she was replaced with the most dreaded judge in the system. I don’t think SBF is necessarily going to be hammered but any great leniency is unlikely now Don’t forget about Sam’s parents being law professors and probably having an unrealistic faith in what legal representation can achieve, especially misplaced in SBF’s context with his political donations embarrassing the government. The donations are what sank him because he was targeted. The speed of his trial proves it. He also cost Tom Brady (hired to do advertisments) a lot of money he invested in FTX.

    He hung himself out to dry in the stand, yet could have been the best most convincing witness ever and avoiding testifying to lies that could be exposed on cross examination by records but still would not have stood a chance with three of the four founders of the firm testifying that he did it. He did not take his pick of the law firms, a 76 year old close friend of the father and enormously wealthy investment fund owner, law professor, and in the 1980’s superstar defense attorney did the rounds to get someone to represent SBF and was turned down repeatedly, so the lawyers Sam got were well down the list and likely the only name ones who would take the case rather than being currently at the top of their game. They were facing a huge prosecutorial team out to get him only, and swiftly going to trial. He ought to have insisted the defence team concentrated on his case much more, they were obviously used to having much more time to work on other things while also mastering the avalanche of irrelevant ‘discovery’ detail in SBF’s case (common prosecutorial ploy flood the defence with complex documents).

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Sean

    You omit his star performance at the New York Times Deal Book gala after the poop storm reached intensity of eleven.

    I am in the Balaji-is-a-loud-mouth-bullshit-artist club (and have acquired a habit of avoiding any of his race when able) but this really is a masterpiece:

    https://balajis.com/p/crypto-twitter-found-sbfs-fraud

  211. @John Johnson
    Russians stand in line for eggs:
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1841499/Russia-Vladimir-Putin-inflation-economy-war

    And back to USSR style lines for the basics.

    Interesting video:

    From cook to stormtrooper in one day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1F0Y2T7sww

    That's one hell of a promotion. Not sure what these Ruskies are complaining about.

    Replies: @Derer, @Mr. Hack

    Not sure what these Ruskies are complaining about.

    I’m guessing that the 5k bonus that’s been promised is being delayed in the mail somewhere (Christmas mail is always slow this time of year). It couldn’t be that these hapless Russian idiots have only now figured out that they’re only being sent into Ukraine to become cannon fodder?

  212. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f2/27/be/f227bec343be864ea7d21a83d6cc41ec.png

    You're right. I'm not crazy about you either, so why don't you quit following me around here at this blogsite? What's the matter, don't you have any other buddies here you can hang out with?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Hacky wants the thread to be him and John Johnson, with the occasional meamjojo 😉

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/12/13/ukraine-aid-united-states-european-union/

    An unspoken, unspeakable potential endgame in the Russia-Ukraine war is suddenly being uttered out loud: Kyiv is at risk of losing — and suffering unimaginable carnage and consequences.

    Andriy Yermak, a top aide to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, told a Washington forum last week that the “big risk” is that Kyiv’s troops could “lose this war.”

    That message should jolt policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. The danger, as Ukraine’s top general warned publicly last month, isn’t simply stalemate. It is that Ukrainian forces, running low on equipment, might be compelled to fall back, shorten their defensive lines and abandon territory.
    “It would be a way back to the darkest times of the war,” Nico Lange, a German security expert on Ukraine, told me.

    It’s essential to think about what Ukraine’s defeat means, because it would be as much a strategic disaster for the United States and its NATO allies as a tableau of terror for Ukraine. Dual cataclysms, equally stark, played out on different timetables.

    A complete Ukrainian military collapse is unlikely, at least in coming months. Kyiv’s armed forces remain well-led and motivated, and they are husbanding equipment to prepare for shortfalls. But it is equally unlikely to expect a negotiated cease-fire with Russia that would maintain existing battle lines. To believe in that seemingly anodyne outcome is to misjudge Putin — again.

    For the Kremlin dictator, a “compromise” would involve Ukraine’s subjugation and dissolution as an independent state. That would include regime change, with Zelensky in exile (or dead), as well as an end to Kyiv’s aspirations to join the E.U. or NATO.

    I don’t think joining the EU was a problem back in 2014 or 2021. It might be now.

    Ukraine in NATO has always been a red line, as now-CIA boss Bill Burns pointed out 15 years ago. What would the US do if Canada or Mexico chose to host Chinese missiles?

    “NATO enlargement, particularly to Ukraine, remains “an emotional and neuralgic issue” for Russia, but strategic policy considerations also underlie strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine and Georgia. In Ukraine, these include fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence, or, some claim, even civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene.

    Which is precisely what happened.

    To be fair to the author, what we’re actually reading is “Ukraine will lose UNLESS the US and Europe dig deep and send loads more money and weapons“.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Might, might, might...unless." Did I miss anything important?...

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Genocide Joe has pledged all available weapons to Israel so there isn't anything to write about unless you are employed by the jack ass Washington Post or similar. If the Palestinians had their act together they would do an American terror attack and pin it on Russia but they do not have the Mossad magic power. The only thing for them to do is die and take as many Jews with them as they can manage.

  213. @Gerard1234
    @Mr. XYZ


    Reminds me a bit of life in the Polish Corridor under Nazi German rule, for those who were both ethnic Poles and pre-1918 German citizens but politically loyal to Poland.
     
    Just a reminder (shithead) that the Poles fought far more enthusiastically and intensively FOR Nazi Germany from 1939-45, than they did in "resisting" for 2 weeks in September 1939. Huge numbers of Poles fought for Nazi Germany. No real surprise as there was plenty of good will from 1933-39 in addition to the Poles loser/inferiority complex .......as the Nazi government ministers favourite holiday destination was Poland and, of course, Poland was Hitlers most loyal ally from 1933-39

    Replies: @ShortOnTime

    I’m afraid that I have to correct you here.

    Poles in WW2 resisted Nazi Germany a lot more than they collaborated, at least as much as was possible for a conquered and defeated nation. Armia Krajowa/Home Army and the Polish Communist acts of resistance were real. The August-October 1944 Warsaw Uprising was very real (not to be confused with the Jewish ghetto one).

    There was less enthusiasm for Nazi Germany in Poland than Napoleon in 19th century.

    Anyway, what’s more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia. Just an accident or something else? After all, Poland-Russia reconciliation efforts have been completely dead since then, perhaps on purpose …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smolensk_air_disaster

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @ShortOnTime


    Anyway, what’s more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia.
     
    New Polish government just admitted that their second commission falsified the results of the expertise to propose two mutually contradictory versions: 1) Russians shot that plane down; 2) the bomb exploded on that plane. The original explanation, that the plane was approaching the airfield too low in foggy conditions, which Russians endorsed, remains.

    This does not mean any impending rapprochement between Poland and the RF. Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.

    Replies: @AP, @ShortOnTime

  214. The past few weeks they’ve been doing a full court press that Trump is going to be a ‘dictator’, specifically a new ‘Adolf Hitler’, should he be re-elected in 2024. The Atlantic has just devoted an entire issue to this present ‘danger to our democracy’. The dire series of articles (see link below) is entitled ‘If Trump Wins’.

    Skimming through them, not surprisingly the articles seem high on emotionalism, but low on substance.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/if-trump-wins/

    Meanwhile it’s openly being said that if Trump wins the progs will be burning down the cities. And, if Trump wins and is prevented from ruling, or is prevented from winning, due to lawfare, the conservatives may ‘rise up’.

    The term ‘civil war’ is more and more openly being spoken of on the airwaves, almost as if it’s a given now that one will take place.

    Being that many amongst the delusional progressives seem to quite literally see Trump as ‘a new Adolf Hitler’ there is an open growing concern being expressed that one of these delusional fanatics might take it upon themselves to assassinate Trump, as after all, if only someone had assassinated the real Hitler early on, all which followed his rise to power might have been prevented.

    Many, myself included, have commented upon how US history from the time of the country’s founding in 1776 has uncannily closely paralleled ancient Rome’s history.

    One such parallel, amongst others, is the late Roman Republic’s ruling First Triumvirate, consisting of Rome’s richest man, the Roman billionaire and real estate speculator Marcus Crassus, the Roman general Pompey, and Crassus’ political protege, Julius Caesar. The obvious parallel here is with Donald Trump, Mike Pompeo, and Trump’s political protege, Jared Kushner.

    It was the shocking untimely death of the real estate speculator Crassus (due to an unwise decision of his regarding an attack upon Parthia, ie present day Iran), which would ultimately result in the kicking off of a Roman civil war, a war which heralded the fall of the Republic, and the rise in it’s place of a military dictatorship.

    As if on cue, and apparently for the benefit of those who might be slow to take a hint, coming this April 2024 a new movie is being released in the United States bluntly entitled Civil War.

    It’s promotional subtheme: ‘All Empires Fall’

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @S

    Definitely predictive programming.

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren't violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war. All of this churning in the media is to justify more surveillance and forced compliance. Probably also to expand gun control.

    What I can see occurring is the government's intentionally created chaos has unintended consequences. Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy. Instead of trying to prevent or control this fracas, normal American institutions and citizens stand back and watch and protect themselves. The two competing subgroups in the USA greatly diminish in size and more importantly clearly display their general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America. During the clean up of this mess the woke and PC ideological influences are exposed and dissipated. The elite groups and deep state which intentionally drove the USA to this chaos are held accountable.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @S

  215. @A123
    @sudden death


    Japan case might be wishfully stretched as remotely comparable somewhat to RF
     
    You admit the Japan case fits. And, you ignored the U.S. case completely.

    I accept your apology. Thanks.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

    There is not a single word about any egg shortages regarding US in your own given links, just the occurrence of regional infection outbreak in one state of Kansas atm without any notable wider market consequences so far;)

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death

    ROTFL;) (1)



    Get Ready for $5 Eggs Again After Bird Flu Hits Top US Producer
    Outbreak affects hens at a Cal-Maine Foods facility in Kansas

     

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-12-13/ready-for-5-eggs-again-prices-set-to-rise-after-bird-flu-hits-top-us-producer

    Replies: @sudden death

  216. @sudden death
    @A123

    There is not a single word about any egg shortages regarding US in your own given links, just the occurrence of regional infection outbreak in one state of Kansas atm without any notable wider market consequences so far;)

    Replies: @A123

    ROTFL;) (1)

    Get Ready for $5 Eggs Again After Bird Flu Hits Top US Producer
    Outbreak affects hens at a Cal-Maine Foods facility in Kansas

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-12-13/ready-for-5-eggs-again-prices-set-to-rise-after-bird-flu-hits-top-us-producer

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    Instead of journo clickbait fearmongering, real US egg market prices SO FAR are not reacting at all, so wake me up if/when their prediction comes home to roost;)


    Eggs US decreased 3.68 USD/DOZEN or 69.57% since the beginning of 2023, according to trading on a contract for difference (CFD) that tracks the benchmark market for this commodity. Historically, Eggs US reached an all time high of 5.29 in December of 2022.
     
    https://tradingeconomics.com/commodity/eggs-us

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  217. @S
    The past few weeks they've been doing a full court press that Trump is going to be a 'dictator', specifically a new 'Adolf Hitler', should he be re-elected in 2024. The Atlantic has just devoted an entire issue to this present 'danger to our democracy'. The dire series of articles (see link below) is entitled 'If Trump Wins'.

    Skimming through them, not surprisingly the articles seem high on emotionalism, but low on substance.


    https://www.theatlantic.com/if-trump-wins/

    Meanwhile it's openly being said that if Trump wins the progs will be burning down the cities. And, if Trump wins and is prevented from ruling, or is prevented from winning, due to lawfare, the conservatives may 'rise up'.

    The term 'civil war' is more and more openly being spoken of on the airwaves, almost as if it's a given now that one will take place.

    Being that many amongst the delusional progressives seem to quite literally see Trump as 'a new Adolf Hitler' there is an open growing concern being expressed that one of these delusional fanatics might take it upon themselves to assassinate Trump, as after all, if only someone had assassinated the real Hitler early on, all which followed his rise to power might have been prevented.

    Many, myself included, have commented upon how US history from the time of the country's founding in 1776 has uncannily closely paralleled ancient Rome's history.

    One such parallel, amongst others, is the late Roman Republic's ruling First Triumvirate, consisting of Rome's richest man, the Roman billionaire and real estate speculator Marcus Crassus, the Roman general Pompey, and Crassus' political protege, Julius Caesar. The obvious parallel here is with Donald Trump, Mike Pompeo, and Trump's political protege, Jared Kushner.

    It was the shocking untimely death of the real estate speculator Crassus (due to an unwise decision of his regarding an attack upon Parthia, ie present day Iran), which would ultimately result in the kicking off of a Roman civil war, a war which heralded the fall of the Republic, and the rise in it's place of a military dictatorship.

    As if on cue, and apparently for the benefit of those who might be slow to take a hint, coming this April 2024 a new movie is being released in the United States bluntly entitled Civil War.

    It's promotional subtheme: 'All Empires Fall'

    https://youtu.be/IHVIG0_-6JA?si=oshV9y8SQHsMGsbX

    Replies: @QCIC

    Definitely predictive programming.

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war. All of this churning in the media is to justify more surveillance and forced compliance. Probably also to expand gun control.

    What I can see occurring is the government’s intentionally created chaos has unintended consequences. Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy. Instead of trying to prevent or control this fracas, normal American institutions and citizens stand back and watch and protect themselves. The two competing subgroups in the USA greatly diminish in size and more importantly clearly display their general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America. During the clean up of this mess the woke and PC ideological influences are exposed and dissipated. The elite groups and deep state which intentionally drove the USA to this chaos are held accountable.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @QCIC


    Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy.
     
    What exact signs do you see within the American Hispanic community that leads you to believe that they're motivated to go to war with the American Black community? Even show any disillusionment or "general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America" as you put it? Where I live in the Southwest, where there's an ocean of Hispanics (Mexicans, Cubans, Guatemalans) there seems to be just the opposite social forces on display. These folks are eager to assimilate into the larger American mosaic and are too busy to resort to much violence. Not even any serious gang violence in Phoenix to be seen, even on the local evening news?

    "Blacks"? Well, there aren't nearly as many in Arizona as there are Hispanics, but they did make some noise during the BLM Floyd general time frame. The local police department got into huge trouble when it became clear that they had acted on concocted charges and perhaps had planted some of their own to help incite some violence and to make it look like a nefarious black gang was involved in instigating violent protests. No black gang was ever found to even exist.

    Replies: @QCIC

    , @S
    @QCIC


    Definitely predictive programming.
     
    Yes, I see the movie as being some rather blunt 'predictive programming'

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war.
     
    Here we'll probably have to agree to disagree.

    I think the United States (not to mention the whole of the Anglosphere) may well experience what Russia experienced 1917-22 as described in the linked below book Imperial Apocalypse, ie defeat in a world war, Communist Revolution, a 'civil war' featuring roving ethnic/political armies led by warlords and characterized by mass executions, a pandemic, and economic collapse, all near simultaneously.

    https://academic.oup.com/book/12205?login=false

    I say this with the caveat that I think the US may experience something worse than what Russia did then as Russia did not have 40 million weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding 'reparations', and did not have the high number of personal firearms with their associated mountains of ammo.

    I'd much prefer your more sanguine vision of things be the correct one, however. :-)

    Replies: @QCIC, @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death

  218. @A123
    @sudden death

    ROTFL;) (1)



    Get Ready for $5 Eggs Again After Bird Flu Hits Top US Producer
    Outbreak affects hens at a Cal-Maine Foods facility in Kansas

     

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-12-13/ready-for-5-eggs-again-prices-set-to-rise-after-bird-flu-hits-top-us-producer

    Replies: @sudden death

    Instead of journo clickbait fearmongering, real US egg market prices SO FAR are not reacting at all, so wake me up if/when their prediction comes home to roost;)

    Eggs US decreased 3.68 USD/DOZEN or 69.57% since the beginning of 2023, according to trading on a contract for difference (CFD) that tracks the benchmark market for this commodity. Historically, Eggs US reached an all time high of 5.29 in December of 2022.

    https://tradingeconomics.com/commodity/eggs-us

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    I have seen eggs with discount promotion multiple times in the few months. There is a possibility the demand curve got a whack when the temporary price spike hit last year.

    Your local restaurant may have not rolled back their menu prices though. I don't spend much money in restaurants.

  219. @Derer
    @John Johnson

    Johnny, you are getting more and more agitated and nervous, signalling the Ukie defeat is near.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Johnny, you are getting more and more agitated and nervous, signalling the Ukie defeat is near.

    Posting a video is a sign of agitation?

    I’ve been posting such videos since the start of the 2.5 week special military operation.

    It’s taken just a tad longer than 2.5 weeks.

    My only regret is not buying defense industry stocks. Who knew that the Russian military was this incompetent and would drag out the war while making US defense companies wealthy.

    I’ll probably buy myself a car when this is over and my stocks rebound. But you keep telling yourself that I must be anxious.

  220. @AP
    @Mikel


    the value of the equipment sent to Ukraine is not being paid by taxpayers.

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.
     

    No, it's not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    Taxpayers are paying to have it shipped to Ukraine; but that cost is offset by what it would have cost to keep maintaining the old vehicles and/or to decommission them and dispose of them.


    Any time the government sends a supplemental appropriations bill to Congress (like the Ukraine-Israel aid package) it means that the regular budget it got approved for the year is not enough and the government needs additional funds.
     
    And those additional funds aren't accounted for by that equipment.

    I don’t know what exactly the US is sending to Ukraine and where it comes from but what I do know with 100% certainty is that your idea that Biden is doing double accounting of the price of equipment already paid for is bananas. Most likely they are calculating the replacement cost of the old equipment being sent.... If the US was depleting its military stocks without replacing them no appropriations bill would be necessary at all.
     
    Bingo.

    So what it seems we are really doing, is paying for new equipment to replace the old and obsolete stuff being sent to Ukraine (which is still better than the old Soviet equipment the Ukrainians and Russians are using). Those billions of dollars aren't being used to buy 30 year old Bradleys being sent to Ukraine (those were purchased decades ago) . They are allocated to replace them with new vehicles for the US military.

    Same with many of the missiles. America was sending older ones nearing or even exceeding their service life, and replacing them with new ones for itself.

    So this part of the Ukraine aid package supposedly spent "on Ukraine" is actually spent "on the USA."

    Do you oppose the US massively upgrading its military, and replacing expiring missiles, while sending the old stock to Ukraine to use to defend itself?


    And that’s just a small part of the package anyway, as the article provided by JJ shows.
     
    It was around 31%.

    And this part of the package is incorrectly presented as cash being sent to Ukraine.


    Paying American workers in the defense sector is not a bad use of money.

    Not for those workers and their employers certainly.
     

    And also for the communities where those workers live and spend their money.

    For the rest of us who are doing the paying it is bad
     
    Is it? Many people think that maintaining a healthy defense industry with high production capacity is a very good thing.

    If economic growth happened the way you describe economic recessions would become a thing of the past. Biden could extend your spending program to all the rest of the sectors of the economy
     
    Or maybe the pure market is more efficient for most economic sectors but not for the defense industry (as also not for the police, corrections, etc.). At least as long as the military and its industry don't maintain self-sufficiency by pillaging other countries. You obviously and for very good reason don't have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.

    It is not me who loves the country of his ancestors so much that feels the need to minimize the burden it is to the US taxpayer
     
    The Ukraine war is a tiny fraction of the defense budget, and much of it consists of upgrading the US's own military.

    Speaking of which, I am not sure, but I suspect more of us American taxpayers support helping Ukraine and a greater share of freeloaders oppose doing so.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2023/05/10/americans-hold-positive-feelings-toward-nato-and-ukraine-see-russia-as-an-enemy/

    "Americans who negatively rate the economic situation and indicate dissatisfaction with the way democracy works in the U.S. are more likely to believe the country should concentrate on issues at home. Americans with lower incomes are also more likely than their middle- or upper-income counterparts to say that the U.S. should focus on domestic issues."

    Replies: @AP, @Mikel

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers. That is in fact a good part of the reason why the fiscal conservative side of the GOP opposes this bill.

    Just because you refuse to accept the obvious I’m not going to repeat myself like a parrot. Anyone else here apart from you who disagrees is welcome to challenge my point but otherwise the matter is more than settled.

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not) is also a very poor use of my time. Economic theory is not this blog’s forte. And we all know that you don’t support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway 🙂

    You obviously and for very good reason don’t have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.

    Not really. What I support is walling and fencing the border as required to stem illegal immigration (which is not at all what Biden is requesting funds for). And I do that precisely because, once the project was complete, it would save lots of taxpayers dollars in al sorts of costs directly associated to the illegal invasion and it would save us even more in the long term in many other types of costs. MAGA is an improvement over the Tea Party movement but there is plenty of common ground between both.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mikel


    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?


    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers.
     
    And I explained that the part of the bill involving weapons acquisition by Ukraine costs America nothing or almost nothing (it costs transportation minus the savings for America not having to decommission and dispose of them) because the weapons that Ukraine is getting are mostly those that were made and purchased decades ago. It is accounted for by replacement cost. Which means that the USA spends that money on itself by replacing old and obsolete weapons sent to Ukraine, with new ones.

    You conveniently ignored that explanation. Why?

    (at least you did not attempt to "win" the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due).

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not)
     
    You should just be open in stating that you want America to be demilitarized to some extent, and oppose increasing the capacity of America's defense industries and improving and modernizing America's military.

    And we all know that you don’t support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway
     
    Things can be good for both.

    The Ukraine aid bill helps Ukraine fight off its invader, punishes a country for invading another country, while also contributing to the modernization of America's military, the revival of its military industry, and helping the economy of the communities in America's heartland that are supported by the military industries. Lots of wins.

    Replies: @Mikel

  221. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Mr. Hack

    Hacky wants the thread to be him and John Johnson, with the occasional meamjojo ;-)

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/12/13/ukraine-aid-united-states-european-union/


    An unspoken, unspeakable potential endgame in the Russia-Ukraine war is suddenly being uttered out loud: Kyiv is at risk of losing — and suffering unimaginable carnage and consequences.

    Andriy Yermak, a top aide to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, told a Washington forum last week that the “big risk” is that Kyiv’s troops could “lose this war.”

    That message should jolt policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. The danger, as Ukraine’s top general warned publicly last month, isn’t simply stalemate. It is that Ukrainian forces, running low on equipment, might be compelled to fall back, shorten their defensive lines and abandon territory.
    “It would be a way back to the darkest times of the war,” Nico Lange, a German security expert on Ukraine, told me.

    It’s essential to think about what Ukraine’s defeat means, because it would be as much a strategic disaster for the United States and its NATO allies as a tableau of terror for Ukraine. Dual cataclysms, equally stark, played out on different timetables.

    A complete Ukrainian military collapse is unlikely, at least in coming months. Kyiv’s armed forces remain well-led and motivated, and they are husbanding equipment to prepare for shortfalls. But it is equally unlikely to expect a negotiated cease-fire with Russia that would maintain existing battle lines. To believe in that seemingly anodyne outcome is to misjudge Putin — again.

    For the Kremlin dictator, a “compromise” would involve Ukraine’s subjugation and dissolution as an independent state. That would include regime change, with Zelensky in exile (or dead), as well as an end to Kyiv’s aspirations to join the E.U. or NATO.

     

    I don't think joining the EU was a problem back in 2014 or 2021. It might be now.

    Ukraine in NATO has always been a red line, as now-CIA boss Bill Burns pointed out 15 years ago. What would the US do if Canada or Mexico chose to host Chinese missiles?

    “NATO enlargement, particularly to Ukraine, remains “an emotional and neuralgic issue” for Russia, but strategic policy considerations also underlie strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine and Georgia. In Ukraine, these include fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence, or, some claim, even civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene.

     

    Which is precisely what happened.

    To be fair to the author, what we're actually reading is "Ukraine will lose UNLESS the US and Europe dig deep and send loads more money and weapons".

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Emil Nikola Richard

    “Might, might, might…unless.” Did I miss anything important?…

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mr. Hack


    Did I miss anything important?
     
    Yeah, Kiev is losing. Does that matter to you? WashPost is laying out the consequences, they have been shaken up by the reality and given green light to say the obvious.

    You like to bury your head in the sand to hide in clownish nonsense. In your defense, most of Arizona is covered by dirty sand, that's what you are used to...and to endless taco trucks signaling the arrival of golden age for American civilization. You will need a mad libertarian like Javier Milei to put a fork in it...currently tested in Argentina. What if you could pretend it is the 1980's again? Given your choices, why not...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  222. @Sean
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Scam Bankrun-Fraud openly gave huge sums to the Dems, and secretly gave a similar amount to the Republicans. He was also covertly holding down the market price of Bitcoin (and maybe was not the only one because quite possibly there is someone still doing it).

    You can't really deter someone like SBF who though it seems illogical had to be hugely important even in the scale of the disaster he'd cause. Stockton Rush the boss of the submarine that was destroyed on a trip to see the wreck of the Titanic was similar. They both absolutely knew how it would end.

    He didn't get offered a plea bargain so they were forcing him to go to trial and the only intention of that was to make plead not guilty all the better to make an example of him the original soft hearted judge dropped out because of a conflict of interest with her husbands firm doing work for SBF's company and she was replaced with the most dreaded judge in the system. I don't think SBF is necessarily going to be hammered but any great leniency is unlikely now Don't forget about Sam's parents being law professors and probably having an unrealistic faith in what legal representation can achieve, especially misplaced in SBF's context with his political donations embarrassing the government. The donations are what sank him because he was targeted. The speed of his trial proves it. He also cost Tom Brady (hired to do advertisments) a lot of money he invested in FTX.


    He hung himself out to dry in the stand, yet could have been the best most convincing witness ever and avoiding testifying to lies that could be exposed on cross examination by records but still would not have stood a chance with three of the four founders of the firm testifying that he did it. He did not take his pick of the law firms, a 76 year old close friend of the father and enormously wealthy investment fund owner, law professor, and in the 1980's superstar defense attorney did the rounds to get someone to represent SBF and was turned down repeatedly, so the lawyers Sam got were well down the list and likely the only name ones who would take the case rather than being currently at the top of their game. They were facing a huge prosecutorial team out to get him only, and swiftly going to trial. He ought to have insisted the defence team concentrated on his case much more, they were obviously used to having much more time to work on other things while also mastering the avalanche of irrelevant 'discovery' detail in SBF's case (common prosecutorial ploy flood the defence with complex documents).

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    You omit his star performance at the New York Times Deal Book gala after the poop storm reached intensity of eleven.

    I am in the Balaji-is-a-loud-mouth-bullshit-artist club (and have acquired a habit of avoiding any of his race when able) but this really is a masterpiece:

    https://balajis.com/p/crypto-twitter-found-sbfs-fraud

  223. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Mr. Hack

    Hacky wants the thread to be him and John Johnson, with the occasional meamjojo ;-)

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/12/13/ukraine-aid-united-states-european-union/


    An unspoken, unspeakable potential endgame in the Russia-Ukraine war is suddenly being uttered out loud: Kyiv is at risk of losing — and suffering unimaginable carnage and consequences.

    Andriy Yermak, a top aide to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, told a Washington forum last week that the “big risk” is that Kyiv’s troops could “lose this war.”

    That message should jolt policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. The danger, as Ukraine’s top general warned publicly last month, isn’t simply stalemate. It is that Ukrainian forces, running low on equipment, might be compelled to fall back, shorten their defensive lines and abandon territory.
    “It would be a way back to the darkest times of the war,” Nico Lange, a German security expert on Ukraine, told me.

    It’s essential to think about what Ukraine’s defeat means, because it would be as much a strategic disaster for the United States and its NATO allies as a tableau of terror for Ukraine. Dual cataclysms, equally stark, played out on different timetables.

    A complete Ukrainian military collapse is unlikely, at least in coming months. Kyiv’s armed forces remain well-led and motivated, and they are husbanding equipment to prepare for shortfalls. But it is equally unlikely to expect a negotiated cease-fire with Russia that would maintain existing battle lines. To believe in that seemingly anodyne outcome is to misjudge Putin — again.

    For the Kremlin dictator, a “compromise” would involve Ukraine’s subjugation and dissolution as an independent state. That would include regime change, with Zelensky in exile (or dead), as well as an end to Kyiv’s aspirations to join the E.U. or NATO.

     

    I don't think joining the EU was a problem back in 2014 or 2021. It might be now.

    Ukraine in NATO has always been a red line, as now-CIA boss Bill Burns pointed out 15 years ago. What would the US do if Canada or Mexico chose to host Chinese missiles?

    “NATO enlargement, particularly to Ukraine, remains “an emotional and neuralgic issue” for Russia, but strategic policy considerations also underlie strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine and Georgia. In Ukraine, these include fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence, or, some claim, even civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene.

     

    Which is precisely what happened.

    To be fair to the author, what we're actually reading is "Ukraine will lose UNLESS the US and Europe dig deep and send loads more money and weapons".

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Emil Nikola Richard

    Genocide Joe has pledged all available weapons to Israel so there isn’t anything to write about unless you are employed by the jack ass Washington Post or similar. If the Palestinians had their act together they would do an American terror attack and pin it on Russia but they do not have the Mossad magic power. The only thing for them to do is die and take as many Jews with them as they can manage.

  224. @sudden death
    @A123

    Instead of journo clickbait fearmongering, real US egg market prices SO FAR are not reacting at all, so wake me up if/when their prediction comes home to roost;)


    Eggs US decreased 3.68 USD/DOZEN or 69.57% since the beginning of 2023, according to trading on a contract for difference (CFD) that tracks the benchmark market for this commodity. Historically, Eggs US reached an all time high of 5.29 in December of 2022.
     
    https://tradingeconomics.com/commodity/eggs-us

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    I have seen eggs with discount promotion multiple times in the few months. There is a possibility the demand curve got a whack when the temporary price spike hit last year.

    Your local restaurant may have not rolled back their menu prices though. I don’t spend much money in restaurants.

  225. @QCIC
    @S

    Definitely predictive programming.

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren't violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war. All of this churning in the media is to justify more surveillance and forced compliance. Probably also to expand gun control.

    What I can see occurring is the government's intentionally created chaos has unintended consequences. Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy. Instead of trying to prevent or control this fracas, normal American institutions and citizens stand back and watch and protect themselves. The two competing subgroups in the USA greatly diminish in size and more importantly clearly display their general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America. During the clean up of this mess the woke and PC ideological influences are exposed and dissipated. The elite groups and deep state which intentionally drove the USA to this chaos are held accountable.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @S

    Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy.

    What exact signs do you see within the American Hispanic community that leads you to believe that they’re motivated to go to war with the American Black community? Even show any disillusionment or “general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America” as you put it? Where I live in the Southwest, where there’s an ocean of Hispanics (Mexicans, Cubans, Guatemalans) there seems to be just the opposite social forces on display. These folks are eager to assimilate into the larger American mosaic and are too busy to resort to much violence. Not even any serious gang violence in Phoenix to be seen, even on the local evening news?

    “Blacks”? Well, there aren’t nearly as many in Arizona as there are Hispanics, but they did make some noise during the BLM Floyd general time frame. The local police department got into huge trouble when it became clear that they had acted on concocted charges and perhaps had planted some of their own to help incite some violence and to make it look like a nefarious black gang was involved in instigating violent protests. No black gang was ever found to even exist.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Mr. Hack

    I was describing a possible future, not an observation.

    As the Hispanic population increases disproportionately in many areas I expect the standard of living to go down due to IQ and cultural differences from the Anglo groups which created the society in the area. In many places this may put Hispanics in conflict with the low income, high crime black subculture. I believe both races have substantial violent criminal gang aspects. The criminality of the Mexican drug cartels seems to be off the charts.

    I agree with Fred Reed's observation that the Mayans and other pre-Columbian native groups had a smart fraction of people who accomplished amazing things. On the other hand, I suspect that without continuous interaction with a dominant European culture their countries end up at a third world level. These people come from an interesting mixture of indigenous and European colonial influences with the attendant mixture of tribal religions and strong Catholicism.

  226. @Mr. Hack
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Might, might, might...unless." Did I miss anything important?...

    Replies: @Beckow

    Did I miss anything important?

    Yeah, Kiev is losing. Does that matter to you? WashPost is laying out the consequences, they have been shaken up by the reality and given green light to say the obvious.

    You like to bury your head in the sand to hide in clownish nonsense. In your defense, most of Arizona is covered by dirty sand, that’s what you are used to…and to endless taco trucks signaling the arrival of golden age for American civilization. You will need a mad libertarian like Javier Milei to put a fork in it…currently tested in Argentina. What if you could pretend it is the 1980’s again? Given your choices, why not…

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Beckow

    When the Washington Post was pointing out the lackluster offensive that the russian military had displayed in the past, you paid it no attention. Now that there's a stalemate going on, Kyiv is supposed to panic and declare that they've been defeated? I'd suggest that you delay your celebrations and ceremonies, there's a lot of war still ahead (unfortunately):

    https://youtu.be/zKB3MdK_0Os
    Update from Ukraine | Crazy Stupid Ruzzian Attack attempt | They never learn | They will Lose 12/15/23

  227. @QCIC
    @S

    Definitely predictive programming.

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren't violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war. All of this churning in the media is to justify more surveillance and forced compliance. Probably also to expand gun control.

    What I can see occurring is the government's intentionally created chaos has unintended consequences. Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy. Instead of trying to prevent or control this fracas, normal American institutions and citizens stand back and watch and protect themselves. The two competing subgroups in the USA greatly diminish in size and more importantly clearly display their general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America. During the clean up of this mess the woke and PC ideological influences are exposed and dissipated. The elite groups and deep state which intentionally drove the USA to this chaos are held accountable.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @S

    Definitely predictive programming.

    Yes, I see the movie as being some rather blunt ‘predictive programming’

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war.

    Here we’ll probably have to agree to disagree.

    I think the United States (not to mention the whole of the Anglosphere) may well experience what Russia experienced 1917-22 as described in the linked below book Imperial Apocalypse, ie defeat in a world war, Communist Revolution, a ‘civil war’ featuring roving ethnic/political armies led by warlords and characterized by mass executions, a pandemic, and economic collapse, all near simultaneously.

    https://academic.oup.com/book/12205?login=false

    I say this with the caveat that I think the US may experience something worse than what Russia did then as Russia did not have 40 million weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding ‘reparations’, and did not have the high number of personal firearms with their associated mountains of ammo.

    I’d much prefer your more sanguine vision of things be the correct one, however. 🙂

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @S

    The system seems to be very fragile in many ways, so it is easy to be pessimistic.

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @S

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    The last time I was at a gun range in CA almost all the guys who were practicing were Chinese. (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    Replies: @songbird, @QCIC, @S

    , @sudden death
    @S


    weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding ‘reparations’
     
    Reminder that Putin secret service operatives were also outright inciting/amplifying and paying for organizing all this “gimme black slavery/genocide reparations” stuff in US long before 2022 invasion in UA happened:

    https://i.imgur.com/4O266Q1.jpeg

    https://i.imgur.com/oijntnQ.png

    https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/22123394/ionov-indictment.pdf

    Replies: @S

  228. @Mr. Hack
    @QCIC


    Something like the Hispanics (mostly illegal and first two generations) go toe to toe with the blacks (African Americans), vying for primacy.
     
    What exact signs do you see within the American Hispanic community that leads you to believe that they're motivated to go to war with the American Black community? Even show any disillusionment or "general lack of compatibility with civilization in North America" as you put it? Where I live in the Southwest, where there's an ocean of Hispanics (Mexicans, Cubans, Guatemalans) there seems to be just the opposite social forces on display. These folks are eager to assimilate into the larger American mosaic and are too busy to resort to much violence. Not even any serious gang violence in Phoenix to be seen, even on the local evening news?

    "Blacks"? Well, there aren't nearly as many in Arizona as there are Hispanics, but they did make some noise during the BLM Floyd general time frame. The local police department got into huge trouble when it became clear that they had acted on concocted charges and perhaps had planted some of their own to help incite some violence and to make it look like a nefarious black gang was involved in instigating violent protests. No black gang was ever found to even exist.

    Replies: @QCIC

    I was describing a possible future, not an observation.

    As the Hispanic population increases disproportionately in many areas I expect the standard of living to go down due to IQ and cultural differences from the Anglo groups which created the society in the area. In many places this may put Hispanics in conflict with the low income, high crime black subculture. I believe both races have substantial violent criminal gang aspects. The criminality of the Mexican drug cartels seems to be off the charts.

    I agree with Fred Reed’s observation that the Mayans and other pre-Columbian native groups had a smart fraction of people who accomplished amazing things. On the other hand, I suspect that without continuous interaction with a dominant European culture their countries end up at a third world level. These people come from an interesting mixture of indigenous and European colonial influences with the attendant mixture of tribal religions and strong Catholicism.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
  229. @S
    @QCIC


    Definitely predictive programming.
     
    Yes, I see the movie as being some rather blunt 'predictive programming'

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war.
     
    Here we'll probably have to agree to disagree.

    I think the United States (not to mention the whole of the Anglosphere) may well experience what Russia experienced 1917-22 as described in the linked below book Imperial Apocalypse, ie defeat in a world war, Communist Revolution, a 'civil war' featuring roving ethnic/political armies led by warlords and characterized by mass executions, a pandemic, and economic collapse, all near simultaneously.

    https://academic.oup.com/book/12205?login=false

    I say this with the caveat that I think the US may experience something worse than what Russia did then as Russia did not have 40 million weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding 'reparations', and did not have the high number of personal firearms with their associated mountains of ammo.

    I'd much prefer your more sanguine vision of things be the correct one, however. :-)

    Replies: @QCIC, @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death

    The system seems to be very fragile in many ways, so it is easy to be pessimistic.

  230. @Beckow
    @Mr. Hack


    Did I miss anything important?
     
    Yeah, Kiev is losing. Does that matter to you? WashPost is laying out the consequences, they have been shaken up by the reality and given green light to say the obvious.

    You like to bury your head in the sand to hide in clownish nonsense. In your defense, most of Arizona is covered by dirty sand, that's what you are used to...and to endless taco trucks signaling the arrival of golden age for American civilization. You will need a mad libertarian like Javier Milei to put a fork in it...currently tested in Argentina. What if you could pretend it is the 1980's again? Given your choices, why not...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    When the Washington Post was pointing out the lackluster offensive that the russian military had displayed in the past, you paid it no attention. Now that there’s a stalemate going on, Kyiv is supposed to panic and declare that they’ve been defeated? I’d suggest that you delay your celebrations and ceremonies, there’s a lot of war still ahead (unfortunately):

    Update from Ukraine | Crazy Stupid Ruzzian Attack attempt | They never learn | They will Lose 12/15/23

  231. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Beckow


    the oligarchs (or “capitalists”?) were very scared.
     
    They were surrounded by millions of experienced soldiers who were suddenly civilians. There was incentive to occupy these fellows working for money!

    Replies: @Mikel

    Inflation is always hard on the poor and people in the late forties-early fifties were much poorer in the US and Western Europe than today. It must have hit them harder. On the other hand, people today are not as used to hardship as they were then so Beckow’s idea that we would have a social explosion if we started having high levels of inflation has some merit but I don’t think it would happen. In the past couple of years we’ve had levels of inflation comparable to the late 40s and people have gotten used to it quite well. The fact that we’ve grown less accustomed to hardship than previous generations also means that we are quite docile.

    The best scenario for the current insane levels of debt is long years of inflation diluting it. But we’ll have to stop adding to that debt at some point too. Supplemental bills of any kind don’t help.

    Milei’s reforms in Argentina may have some effect on all this. There are people in the Republican Party receptive to the economic ideas he’s championing but I’m not sure how important Argentina is these days for 1st World countries to start emulating it, no matter how effective his policies happen to be. Argentina’s economy is in such a bad shape and so entangled in an interventionist nightmare at all levels that it will be many years before it can become a free market, fiscal responsibility success story, if it ever gets there. Besides, the first measures Milei has adopted point to a much more pragmatic approach that what he campaigned for.

    Perhaps this is why Ron Paul and other libertarians seem to be ignoring Milei. I was pretty sure he would post a column about his victory in Argentina but I haven’t seen any. His chances of success, given the situation he inherits and his personality, are small so why associate the libertarian brand to such a figure?

  232. @S
    @QCIC


    Definitely predictive programming.
     
    Yes, I see the movie as being some rather blunt 'predictive programming'

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war.
     
    Here we'll probably have to agree to disagree.

    I think the United States (not to mention the whole of the Anglosphere) may well experience what Russia experienced 1917-22 as described in the linked below book Imperial Apocalypse, ie defeat in a world war, Communist Revolution, a 'civil war' featuring roving ethnic/political armies led by warlords and characterized by mass executions, a pandemic, and economic collapse, all near simultaneously.

    https://academic.oup.com/book/12205?login=false

    I say this with the caveat that I think the US may experience something worse than what Russia did then as Russia did not have 40 million weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding 'reparations', and did not have the high number of personal firearms with their associated mountains of ammo.

    I'd much prefer your more sanguine vision of things be the correct one, however. :-)

    Replies: @QCIC, @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    The last time I was at a gun range in CA almost all the guys who were practicing were Chinese. (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)
     
    I was surprised to learn recently that, long ago, Jackie Chan had plastic surgery done to his eyes.

    IIRC, Chinese people always thought he looked a little off. As a boy, they called him "Big Nose" and hinted that he might not really be full Chinese.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    , @QCIC
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Refer to Sailer's Law.

    , @S
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?
     
    LOL! I've read Sailer's theorem. One on one, it wouldn't be much of a match. But in a Russian Civil War scenario in the United States, it wouldn't be one on one, but the Blacks would be operating under the protection of the now 'woke' US military.

    The George Floyd riots were a dress rehearsal for the Communist revolution to come. Except next time when the Blacks with their Antifa masters come marching into suburban neighborhoods, they will do so armed and shooting, ostensibly to take possession of their 'reparations'. And should anyone have the temerity to resist with assault rifles, the Blacks/Antifa will be able to call up the US Air Force, or, US Army artillery to take care of such persons.

    As poorly performing no doubt as a woke operated Abrams tank or F-16 would likely. be, they would still beat superbly operated assault rifles.



    Remember, during the George Floyd riots, high level officers were letting it be known beforehand they would not act against the Antifa arsonists/terrorists and Black looters even if Trump gave them direct orders to do so. Nothing happened to these officers for their mutinous actions either.

    And after January 6, the various National Guards followed orders and did as they were told and occupied Washington DC. [This military occupation of DC and guarding of Biden's unlawful inauguration was the real 'insurrection' and seizure of power, and with Trump's blessing to boot.]

    I therefore wouldn't have any great expectations of large scale defections from the US military which has been purged since Obama's time in office, and especially since Jan 6, of it's US constitution honoring leadership and rank and file. [And who can say, in a civil war scenario the US government might just use foreign mercenaries to 'fortify' potentially reluctant US troops.]

    As for Trump himself, I think he's either controlled or compromised in some manner.

    Certainly resist in some fashion, but think outside the box if there is to be a chance of overcoming the present circumstances. As an example of 'outside of the box', though not the specifics, is in War of the Worlds where the hordes of Martian invaders with their high technology and heat rays seemed unstoppable, and swept all before them, until lowly Earth pathogens utterly destroyed them as they had no immunity.

    This was something completely unexpected. It will likely have to be something equally out of left field and unexpected to overcome the situation that we now find ourselves in.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c6/The_War_of_the_Worlds_by_Henrique_Alvim_Corrêa_15.jpg
  233. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @S

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    The last time I was at a gun range in CA almost all the guys who were practicing were Chinese. (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    Replies: @songbird, @QCIC, @S

    (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    I was surprised to learn recently that, long ago, Jackie Chan had plastic surgery done to his eyes.

    IIRC, Chinese people always thought he looked a little off. As a boy, they called him “Big Nose” and hinted that he might not really be full Chinese.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @songbird

    And now all those people who called him names will tell you he was like their best friend. People totally suck. Usually. : )

  234. @songbird
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)
     
    I was surprised to learn recently that, long ago, Jackie Chan had plastic surgery done to his eyes.

    IIRC, Chinese people always thought he looked a little off. As a boy, they called him "Big Nose" and hinted that he might not really be full Chinese.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    And now all those people who called him names will tell you he was like their best friend. People totally suck. Usually. : )

    • Agree: songbird
  235. @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere
    @LatW


    I thought he was a Japanophile Chinese, not Japanese.
     
    Yeah and your one of the Russophobe Vecticībnieki. 😄

    Replies: @LatW, @Gerard1234

    Just to repeat my reply from the previous thread you may have missed :

    Yea, Riga does count very much – since Riga was mostly built by Germans and Latvians. They did not have a substantial presence compared to Latvians. Do not ever bring up Riga again in these conversations.

    Wow, I could not let this garbage written to Beckow pass.
    This is ridiculous….the first Riga architect that enters anyones head immediately is Eisenstein you idiot. Technically Jewish, but more than classifies enough to be considered a Russian architect. Then second name is Antonov – with him and Eisenstein the quality and quantity of their buildings around Riga is what makes them the primary ones anybody thinks of. Then after that its several excellent german architects, Swedes,Jews and many more Russian architects and engineers. Only AFTER that list do we get to minuscule number of Latvians “building” Riga you retarded idiot. Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg. How can trash like you lie so much?

    Outside of Old Riga (which still has several buildings designed by Russian architects, and of course zero by Latvian ones) – what wasn’t designed by Russians …..was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money, and ALL these were project managed by Russians , on orders of RUSSIANS so that these structures suit RUSSIAN tastes and interests you serial dumbfuck.

    I just can’t believe how much of a lying POS you have to be to write that nonsense to Beckow.
    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians. There is the Cultural Palace, I think the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built, the massive bandstand at Mezhapark entirely Soviet/Russian project you imbecile in the architecture and the ethos of it ( travelling in Europe I haven’t seen a bandstand close to the size or style). MinNauk building is basically like one of the Seven sisters and, again, impossible to miss as the tallest building in Riga. The old stock exchange. The Ridzene hotel a typical soviet beauty ( and I think the top 3 hotels that I know of there are Russian built)

    Then of course there is the Gorky bridge (and ANY bridge over the Daugava you dipshit), and EVERY bit of big public infrastructure that exists in Riga providing the water, heat, taking the sewage away of anybody living in Riga, road – EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.

    Whole neighbourhoods of the Riga conurbation built by the Soviets/Russians. Several well-known mansions from Tsarists times designed by Russians around Riga.

    Then I clearly remember visiting (as its at the most directly opposite the lovely (German) Riga Cathedral)……….the lovely Russia insurance society building which is definitely Russian-made, with joined to it the Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect. So in arguably the focal point of the city, the country – the Dom square the biggest and most relaxed square in the city, with the prestigious and beautiful German cathedral…….and directly opposite it around the square are definitely 1 , probably 2 large Russian buildings. Nowhere is there anything Latvian ( except for the retard red/brown – white flags LOL)

    Masses of Old Believers and Russian merchants found there way into Riga pre and early Tsarist era. ROC churches are a HUGE part of Riga you dickhead (certainly for the tourists). Its impossible to imagine Riga without these masterpiece churches, impossible to imagine Riga WITH “latvian” churches. There is the historic Moscow Forshstadt area ( where the MinNauk building is) and going through Riga I remember you can still see several wooden clad buildings………which means RUSSIAN (either Old Believers or Merchants) houses as the others would have the brick or stone exterior buildings. In none of this , is there such a thing as “Latvian” architecture you worthless, lying , pathetic scumbag.

    So key, historic landmarks, key and extensive infrastructure covering the public, cultural, education, finance sectors…. the entire city owing its existence to Russian people and Russian money , LMAO.

    That’s also not even taking into consideration the pre-Tsarist German and Swedish buildings destroyed during WW2 and rebuilt to a wonderful standard by the Soviets ……..or those masterful Tsarist Russian buildings that the Soviets removed, or the some of the masterful Stalinist-era buildings Khrushchev-era removed.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Gerard1234

    As typical, your post is filled with lies and manipulations with context.


    Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg.
     
    Various nationalities were educated in St Pete, but prior to the establishment of our own university, we received our higher education at the Tartu University - one of the oldest in the region (founded by Swedes). As to Latvian architects of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, some of them were educated in Paris or Italy (not just St Pete).

    A long list of notable buildings have been designed by ethnic Latvian architects (with the help of our own local construction company owners).

    Old Riga
     
    This is the most important area of the city, culturally speaking (but also commercially) - and it was not built by the Russian Empire at all, but over the centuries through a mix of German, Latvian and some Swedish efforts. Side note about the Baltic Germans:

    The Baltic Germans are an artificial nationality created through a colonization and assimilation process that spanned centuries and, while they retained an ethnic German core, they were not fully German. In a socially upward move, some locals (as well as some outside nationalities) blended into that nationality (which coincided with a higher social class). Yes, including Balts and Estonians.

    The well known Lieven family claims to be the descendants of the Liv tribal chieftain (Kaupo of the 13th century), hence their last name (Lieven means the Livs in German – so the origins of this family are not even Germanic but Baltic Finnic).

    was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money
     
    There was no such thing as "Russian money", that was the Imperial treasury, also there was a lot of money that was generated in place and Riga had its own treasury.

    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians.
     
    The Riga Market has stood there since time immemorial, and was mentioned already in the 16th century. In 1922, large construction was undertaken there by an ethnic Latvian architect and the Riga City Council (also ethnic LV).

    the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built
     
    No. The Central Bank building was designed by an ethnic Latvian architect (Augusts Reinbergs), and the Riga Bourse building - by a Baltic German.

    The Riga Castle was built during the Livonian times (13th cent, although apparently there had been a building there even before).

    Main churches - the Dome, St Pete's, all the Catholic churches downtown, the Anglican church - were all there before the Russian Empire even showed up.

    The list goes on. Of course, there was some notable presence of the Russian Empire resources there, however, take together, majority of the city is built by Germans and Latvians, as I originally stated. Through the period of its more rapid growth (late 19th cent - early 20th cent), Latvians had been fully emancipated for a long time already and owned many business enterprises, not to mention that there was a thriving professional class and a large working class Latvian population that was also literate.

    Masses of Old Believers
     
    Not masses, but the largest proportion outside Russia, yes. Old Believers have been a loyal minority for a long time now. Many of them have spoken Latvian for a long time, probably even before the 1930s (along with their old Russian dialect).

    As to Old Believer merchants, they were like fish looking for deeper waters - they were not some selfless contributors, but simply tried to found enterprises closer to Europe for transportation purposes, also because the commercial culture in the Baltics was smoother than in the Slavic parts
    of the Russian Empire.


    EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.
     
    The Soviet leadership was in most cases ethnic Latvian, the construction workers, too (probably in some cases managers as well). You simply pretend they didn't exist.

    Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect.
     
    No, the architect was a Litvak (may have spoken Yiddish, and most likely spoke Latvian or Lithuanian, too, since he was from Kaunas).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Mandelstamm

    Construction was interrupted by WW1, then finished in 1926 by ethnic Latvians during the first republic.

    In the last 30 years, during the second republic, a few prominent buildings have been erected (most notably the National Library, the Castle of Light), as well as countless residential buildings (mostly Nordic and Lithuanian investment), countless renovated churches and historical landmarks (including Orthodox churches, so you might want to thank us for maintaining heritage that has connections with you).

    Replies: @LatW

    , @LatW
    @Gerard1234

    So to address your lies and misrepresentations in more detail, these were the best known architects in the late 19th - early 20th century:

    Karl Felsko (Baltic German, although last name sounds Swedish)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Felsko

    Mikhail Eisenstein - born in a Jewish merchant family in Bila Tsirkva (currently Ukraine), named Moishe Eisenstein at birth. Designed my favorite facade with women's visages:
    https://www.bruceonarthistory.com/2017/12/13/facade-10b-elizabetes-iela-riga/

    Wilhelm Bockslaff (old aristocratic Baltic German family)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Bockslaff

    Robert Pflug (Baltic German, designed the Orthodox Nativity Cathedral that you mentioned)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Pflug

    Konstantīns Pēkšēns (Latvian, designed many famous Art Nouveau buildings downtown, including a residential building showcasing on the famous Alberta street, and a prominent Orthodox church)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstant%C4%ABns_P%C4%93k%C5%A1%C4%93ns

    Eižens Laube (Latvian)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ei%C5%BEens_Laube

    And there are several others (among the more prominent ones, none are ethnically Russian) who designed most of the buildings of that time. The Latvian architect who designed the Central Bank actually designed a residential building in St Petersburg.

    Many of them were trained in the Riga Polytechnical Institute, or in Berlin or in St Pete.

    Here is a more detailed write up in English, listing these and several other prominent Riga architects (as you can see, mostly Baltic German with several Latvians who were very productive) with their detailed bios, as well as the addresses of the buildings they designed, most of which are in central areas of the city).

    https://jugendstils.riga.lv/eng/JugendstilsRiga/Architects/

  236. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/dec/15/ukrainian-soldiers-ukraine-volodymyr-zelenskiy

    Now, what Ukrainian soldiers really care about is physical tiredness. There is no procedure for discharging those who went to fight at the start of the invasion, including those who volunteered. They have a duty to serve until the end of the war. Last month, some servicemen’s relatives sent an appeal to the headquarters of the supreme commander-in-chief asking for clearly defined terms of service. “The assumption that experienced soldiers after 20 months of active combat remain motivated and have the physical and psychological resources to continue military service is false,” it read.

    It’s become such a big issue that Zelenskiy has instructed the commander-in-chief of the armed forces, the general staff, and the ministry of defence to find solutions, while factions in parliament are preparing a draft law that will change the rules for mobilising and discharging soldiers.

    To wage a war of attrition, Ukraine needs more fighters, but it’s tricky to keep hundreds of thousands of troops in barracks, as they won’t have enough equipment. And Ukraine’s economy might not be able to sustain an army twice its current size.

    Only males aged 27 to 60 are currently drafted, while a recent decision to lower the age for mobilisation to 25 is yet to be implemented. Conscripts (aged 18-20) are not allowed to be sent to the battlefield. But younger men can volunteer to fight.

    The deputy commander of the squadron, who is in his mid-40s, prefers not to let the younger soldiers fight instead of him: “The newbies, especially the young ones, are the least careful. Often they do not understand what’s at stake,” he says.

    The real issue is not so much about age, but experience. They can’t afford to let the experienced fighters go.

    What I don’t understand, and this article doesn’t tell me, is why they can’t rotate troops out of the front line to rear areas, perhaps to train others and be out of combat for a month or two. Unless, as is quite possible, they just need all their experienced guys to keep the front line vaguely stable.

    And if only males 27-60 are drafted, who are these 18-20 year old conscripts?

    The Ukrainian position as expressed by Western media is “we have lost so many, how can we give up and break faith with them?”

    The Russian position, as expressed by Kremlin spokespeople, is “they subverted Minsk 2, they turned down a deal in February 2022, defeat is the only thing they’ll understand. Anything less will be a betrayal of our dead“.

    For one side, continuing to fight because of previous dead will be a Sunk Cost Fallacy. Call me a cynic, but I think the side with huge arms industries, vast energy resources, and three to four times the population is not going to lose. Boris Johnson is the Psychologically Manipulative Scammer Of Death.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_cost#Fallacy_effect

    This is the sunk cost fallacy, and such behavior may be described as “throwing good money after bad”, while refusing to succumb to what may be described as “cutting one’s losses”. People can remain in failing relationships because they “have already invested too much to leave”. Other people are swayed by arguments that a war must continue because lives will have been sacrificed in vain unless victory is achieved. Individuals caught up in psychologically manipulative scams will continue investing time, money and emotional energy into the project, despite doubts or suspicions that something is not right.

    • Replies: @QCIC
    @YetAnotherAnon

    After years of gradually decreasing population, especially the loss of more mobile younger people, the actual population ratio of available Russian fighters to Ukrainian fighters is possibly greater than 5:1. If you subtract the remaining Ukrainians who don't really hate Russia the ratio is even more lopsided.

    This may suggest the actual Russian strategy: they may expect to cull hostile Ukrainian fighters until the ratio is 10:1, at which point Russia can reliably police the region and return it to the fold.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

  237. @AP
    @Beckow


    …he got another $200 million worth of weapons and ammo which will be enough to tide Ukraine over until January

    Maybe till New Year if the war takes a break over Christmas
     
    He got $175 million a few weeks ago.

    There is $4.4 billion left that can still be given but has not been distributed yet.

    It is not sustainable. US has spent $110 billion so far on the Ukie aid, incl. paying salaries-pensions.
     
    Of course it has not spent $110 billion.

    A lot of that amount is the inflated value of the equipment that Ukraine is getting, like those missiles that are at or near their expiration date, which would have to be safely destroyed at considerable cost to US taxpayers if they weren't sent to Ukraine to be fired at Russian invaders. The vehicles and other equipment is valued at their price when they were new, and not at what they are currently worth. And regardless the value, it isn't cash being sent.

    A lot of that amount is the cost of ammo being made at US factories. This is good for American workers in the heartland, and good for the US defense industry. It, too, isn't cash being sent to Ukraine.

    And here the total that Ukraine has gotten in equipment + cash has been $75 billion:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/12/us/politics/ukraine-us-military-aid.html#:~:text=Since%20Russia's%20February%202022%20invasion,and%20addressing%20its%20humanitarian%20needs.

    Since Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration has sent more than $75 billion in cash and equipment to the country for its defense. Most of the aid has gone to Ukraine’s military operations, keeping its government running and addressing its humanitarian needs.

    Looks like the cash amount has been $26.4 billion.

    A little bit more than 10 Las Vegas spheres.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H38U2q96OTg

    Or ten miles of New York subway:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-02-23/in-nyc-subway-a-case-study-in-runaway-transit-construction-costs

    Not much, all things considered, for wrecking much of Russia's military.

    What a f..ing waste, this will be studied for decades for the cosmic level stupidity.
     
    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Derer

    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.

    How could milking the Washington and Brussels simpleminded players at 33 trillion debt be stupid from Russian point of view. Actually this is the main reason for Putin policy to “go slow”. Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.

    It appears that waiting for the removal of Kiev leadership from within and causing economic stress for the adversaries is paying off. Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Derer


    Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.
     
    Sure, Russia just volunteered to lose 100k dead over 2 years, for fun.

    Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.
     
    LOL is that what they believe wherever you are?

    In Germany's large grocery chain, 1 kg bread: 4 Euros or $4.34

    https://e-center-knauer.edeka-shops.de/en/all-products/bread-pastries/bread/toast-white-bread/lieken-urkorn-fit-vital-weizen-500g-zid4009249002277

    In the USA it's about $3.00:

    https://stopandshop.com/product/stop-shop-big-daisy-white-bread-20-oz-pkg/56239

    In one of the Moscow grocery stores near one of my wife's flats, one of the cheaper breads is about $3.00 for a kilogram:

    https://av.ru/i/468307/

    https://av.ru/search/?text=%D1%85%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%B1

    Same as America.

    Now compare incomes of Moscow to America or Germany.

    Replies: @Beckow

  238. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @S

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    The last time I was at a gun range in CA almost all the guys who were practicing were Chinese. (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    Replies: @songbird, @QCIC, @S

    Refer to Sailer’s Law.

  239. @YetAnotherAnon
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/dec/15/ukrainian-soldiers-ukraine-volodymyr-zelenskiy

    Now, what Ukrainian soldiers really care about is physical tiredness. There is no procedure for discharging those who went to fight at the start of the invasion, including those who volunteered. They have a duty to serve until the end of the war. Last month, some servicemen’s relatives sent an appeal to the headquarters of the supreme commander-in-chief asking for clearly defined terms of service. “The assumption that experienced soldiers after 20 months of active combat remain motivated and have the physical and psychological resources to continue military service is false,” it read.

    It’s become such a big issue that Zelenskiy has instructed the commander-in-chief of the armed forces, the general staff, and the ministry of defence to find solutions, while factions in parliament are preparing a draft law that will change the rules for mobilising and discharging soldiers.

    To wage a war of attrition, Ukraine needs more fighters, but it’s tricky to keep hundreds of thousands of troops in barracks, as they won’t have enough equipment. And Ukraine’s economy might not be able to sustain an army twice its current size.

    Only males aged 27 to 60 are currently drafted, while a recent decision to lower the age for mobilisation to 25 is yet to be implemented. Conscripts (aged 18-20) are not allowed to be sent to the battlefield. But younger men can volunteer to fight.

    The deputy commander of the squadron, who is in his mid-40s, prefers not to let the younger soldiers fight instead of him: “The newbies, especially the young ones, are the least careful. Often they do not understand what’s at stake,” he says.

    The real issue is not so much about age, but experience. They can’t afford to let the experienced fighters go.
     
    What I don't understand, and this article doesn't tell me, is why they can't rotate troops out of the front line to rear areas, perhaps to train others and be out of combat for a month or two. Unless, as is quite possible, they just need all their experienced guys to keep the front line vaguely stable.

    And if only males 27-60 are drafted, who are these 18-20 year old conscripts?

    The Ukrainian position as expressed by Western media is "we have lost so many, how can we give up and break faith with them?"

    The Russian position, as expressed by Kremlin spokespeople, is "they subverted Minsk 2, they turned down a deal in February 2022, defeat is the only thing they'll understand. Anything less will be a betrayal of our dead".

    For one side, continuing to fight because of previous dead will be a Sunk Cost Fallacy. Call me a cynic, but I think the side with huge arms industries, vast energy resources, and three to four times the population is not going to lose. Boris Johnson is the Psychologically Manipulative Scammer Of Death.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_cost#Fallacy_effect

    This is the sunk cost fallacy, and such behavior may be described as "throwing good money after bad", while refusing to succumb to what may be described as "cutting one's losses". People can remain in failing relationships because they "have already invested too much to leave". Other people are swayed by arguments that a war must continue because lives will have been sacrificed in vain unless victory is achieved. Individuals caught up in psychologically manipulative scams will continue investing time, money and emotional energy into the project, despite doubts or suspicions that something is not right.
     

    Replies: @QCIC

    After years of gradually decreasing population, especially the loss of more mobile younger people, the actual population ratio of available Russian fighters to Ukrainian fighters is possibly greater than 5:1. If you subtract the remaining Ukrainians who don’t really hate Russia the ratio is even more lopsided.

    This may suggest the actual Russian strategy: they may expect to cull hostile Ukrainian fighters until the ratio is 10:1, at which point Russia can reliably police the region and return it to the fold.

    • Replies: @AnonfromTN
    @QCIC


    reliably police the region and return it to the fold
     
    These are two different things. The great majority of RF citizens are vehemently opposed to absorbing Ukraine, which they see as an inferior region populated by people with the mentality of thieves and panhandlers. Remember, Putin is a “dictator”, and therefore, in sharp contrast to “democratic” rulers, cares about the opinions of the people he rules.

    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.

    Replies: @LatW

  240. @ShortOnTime
    @Gerard1234

    I'm afraid that I have to correct you here.

    Poles in WW2 resisted Nazi Germany a lot more than they collaborated, at least as much as was possible for a conquered and defeated nation. Armia Krajowa/Home Army and the Polish Communist acts of resistance were real. The August-October 1944 Warsaw Uprising was very real (not to be confused with the Jewish ghetto one).

    There was less enthusiasm for Nazi Germany in Poland than Napoleon in 19th century.

    Anyway, what's more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia. Just an accident or something else? After all, Poland-Russia reconciliation efforts have been completely dead since then, perhaps on purpose ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smolensk_air_disaster

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    Anyway, what’s more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia.

    New Polish government just admitted that their second commission falsified the results of the expertise to propose two mutually contradictory versions: 1) Russians shot that plane down; 2) the bomb exploded on that plane. The original explanation, that the plane was approaching the airfield too low in foggy conditions, which Russians endorsed, remains.

    This does not mean any impending rapprochement between Poland and the RF. Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.

    • Thanks: ShortOnTime
    • Replies: @AP
    @AnonfromTN


    Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.
     
    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

    Replies: @Cesar1191, @Mr. XYZ

    , @ShortOnTime
    @AnonfromTN

    Thanks for explaining some of the details of that murky plane crash.

    Otherwise, Poland-Russia enmity seems simply irreconcilable like so many other conflicts in the world. Especially with Ukraine currently, it's a real tragedy since everyone's positions have hardened too deeply for any happy endings (It looks like that for as long as Ukraine exists Russia won't have solved the problem of the unforgiving Ukrainian nationalism aimed against it).

    Replies: @QCIC

  241. @QCIC
    @YetAnotherAnon

    After years of gradually decreasing population, especially the loss of more mobile younger people, the actual population ratio of available Russian fighters to Ukrainian fighters is possibly greater than 5:1. If you subtract the remaining Ukrainians who don't really hate Russia the ratio is even more lopsided.

    This may suggest the actual Russian strategy: they may expect to cull hostile Ukrainian fighters until the ratio is 10:1, at which point Russia can reliably police the region and return it to the fold.

    Replies: @AnonfromTN

    reliably police the region and return it to the fold

    These are two different things. The great majority of RF citizens are vehemently opposed to absorbing Ukraine, which they see as an inferior region populated by people with the mentality of thieves and panhandlers. Remember, Putin is a “dictator”, and therefore, in sharp contrast to “democratic” rulers, cares about the opinions of the people he rules.

    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @AnonfromTN


    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.
     
    Very ambitious.

    mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat
     
    Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).

    Replies: @Beckow, @AnonfromTN

  242. @AnonfromTN
    @QCIC


    reliably police the region and return it to the fold
     
    These are two different things. The great majority of RF citizens are vehemently opposed to absorbing Ukraine, which they see as an inferior region populated by people with the mentality of thieves and panhandlers. Remember, Putin is a “dictator”, and therefore, in sharp contrast to “democratic” rulers, cares about the opinions of the people he rules.

    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.

    Replies: @LatW

    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.

    Very ambitious.

    mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat

    Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @LatW


    ...Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).
     
    Good for Poland...they have imported a minority that may have some demands in the future. What does that do for the Nato plan to move to Ukraine? Or for Ukraine?

    How many able bodied Slavs are there in Riga? Half a million? Why don't you celebrate it? Instead you engage in your atavistic fascism, foaming at the mouth while seeking "revenge", and lying about Riga's past - see Gerard above, you got caught prevaricating like with your denial of the Latvian WW2 Nazi SS Division...you guys have no class.

    Replies: @LatW

    , @AnonfromTN
    @LatW


    Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs
     
    I applaud Western self-deception, parroted by the people afflicted by inferiority complex in the Baltic statelets. The EU mostly gets from Ukraine lazy scum looking for freebies and unwilling to work. Most of that trash is from areas where there is no war. That scum behaves accordingly, which European residents feel and complain about, but the compradore European governments pretend not to notice.

    Decent residents of Ukraine willing to work do two things: stay put or move to Russia. As of today, there are more than 5 million Ukrainian refugees in Russia, where they get some assistance at the beginning, but then are expected to earn their keep. Maybe a few thousands of these are Ukrainian terrorists. FSB is dealing with those. The rest are normal decent people, a real human asset.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP, @LatW

  243. @Mikel
    @AP


    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?
     
    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers. That is in fact a good part of the reason why the fiscal conservative side of the GOP opposes this bill.

    Just because you refuse to accept the obvious I'm not going to repeat myself like a parrot. Anyone else here apart from you who disagrees is welcome to challenge my point but otherwise the matter is more than settled.

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not) is also a very poor use of my time. Economic theory is not this blog's forte. And we all know that you don't support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway :-)


    You obviously and for very good reason don’t have a problem with government spending program to secure the border.
     
    Not really. What I support is walling and fencing the border as required to stem illegal immigration (which is not at all what Biden is requesting funds for). And I do that precisely because, once the project was complete, it would save lots of taxpayers dollars in al sorts of costs directly associated to the illegal invasion and it would save us even more in the long term in many other types of costs. MAGA is an improvement over the Tea Party movement but there is plenty of common ground between both.

    Replies: @AP

    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?

    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers.

    And I explained that the part of the bill involving weapons acquisition by Ukraine costs America nothing or almost nothing (it costs transportation minus the savings for America not having to decommission and dispose of them) because the weapons that Ukraine is getting are mostly those that were made and purchased decades ago. It is accounted for by replacement cost. Which means that the USA spends that money on itself by replacing old and obsolete weapons sent to Ukraine, with new ones.

    You conveniently ignored that explanation. Why?

    (at least you did not attempt to “win” the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due).

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not)

    You should just be open in stating that you want America to be demilitarized to some extent, and oppose increasing the capacity of America’s defense industries and improving and modernizing America’s military.

    And we all know that you don’t support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway

    Things can be good for both.

    The Ukraine aid bill helps Ukraine fight off its invader, punishes a country for invading another country, while also contributing to the modernization of America’s military, the revival of its military industry, and helping the economy of the communities in America’s heartland that are supported by the military industries. Lots of wins.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @AP


    at least you did not attempt to “win” the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due
     
    Thanks. I'd love to return the favor and say that you're not being a moron this time but then I would be lying indeed and I don't do that.

    While we all understand why you do it, using moronic arguments to try to convince people that spending so many billions on Ukraine is actually good for the US economy is a futile exercise. Nobody buys it and it ends up being counterproductive for the Ukrainian cause. The Dems have been using lots of arguments in favor of the aid but that's not one of them.

    Replies: @AP

  244. @AnonfromTN
    @ShortOnTime


    Anyway, what’s more interesting is what really happened with the 2010 Smolensk plane crash of high level Polish visitors to Russia.
     
    New Polish government just admitted that their second commission falsified the results of the expertise to propose two mutually contradictory versions: 1) Russians shot that plane down; 2) the bomb exploded on that plane. The original explanation, that the plane was approaching the airfield too low in foggy conditions, which Russians endorsed, remains.

    This does not mean any impending rapprochement between Poland and the RF. Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.

    Replies: @AP, @ShortOnTime

    Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.

    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

    • Agree: Mr. XYZ
    • Replies: @Cesar1191
    @AP


    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

     

    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles. lol. By what metric could this possibly be true? It is certainly not true for GDP per capita, life expectancy, industrial production per capita, science production per capita, AIDS prevalence, etc.

    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism, and more importantly, about continued Russian imperialism and the continued threat that the country poses to its neighbors. Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.

    Replies: @LatW, @AP

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    I think that a part of this might be envy towards the West: Towards the West's success, towards the West's power, and towards the West's influence, all of which Russia could not realistically hope to match right now. Russia lost its golden moment during the 20th century as a result of Communism. Lenin really did deserve to get a bullet put into his head sometime before early 1917. Killing both Trotsky and Stalin as well would have, of course, really helped as well.

  245. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @S

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    The last time I was at a gun range in CA almost all the guys who were practicing were Chinese. (or Japanese or Korean same dif to round eyes.)

    Replies: @songbird, @QCIC, @S

    If whites with assault rifles and blacks with 9mm pistols start shooting at each other what do you imagine would be the probable outcome?

    LOL! I’ve read Sailer’s theorem. One on one, it wouldn’t be much of a match. But in a Russian Civil War scenario in the United States, it wouldn’t be one on one, but the Blacks would be operating under the protection of the now ‘woke’ US military.

    The George Floyd riots were a dress rehearsal for the Communist revolution to come. Except next time when the Blacks with their Antifa masters come marching into suburban neighborhoods, they will do so armed and shooting, ostensibly to take possession of their ‘reparations’. And should anyone have the temerity to resist with assault rifles, the Blacks/Antifa will be able to call up the US Air Force, or, US Army artillery to take care of such persons.

    As poorly performing no doubt as a woke operated Abrams tank or F-16 would likely. be, they would still beat superbly operated assault rifles.

    [MORE]

    Remember, during the George Floyd riots, high level officers were letting it be known beforehand they would not act against the Antifa arsonists/terrorists and Black looters even if Trump gave them direct orders to do so. Nothing happened to these officers for their mutinous actions either.

    And after January 6, the various National Guards followed orders and did as they were told and occupied Washington DC. [This military occupation of DC and guarding of Biden’s unlawful inauguration was the real ‘insurrection’ and seizure of power, and with Trump’s blessing to boot.]

    I therefore wouldn’t have any great expectations of large scale defections from the US military which has been purged since Obama’s time in office, and especially since Jan 6, of it’s US constitution honoring leadership and rank and file. [And who can say, in a civil war scenario the US government might just use foreign mercenaries to ‘fortify’ potentially reluctant US troops.]

    As for Trump himself, I think he’s either controlled or compromised in some manner.

    Certainly resist in some fashion, but think outside the box if there is to be a chance of overcoming the present circumstances. As an example of ‘outside of the box’, though not the specifics, is in War of the Worlds where the hordes of Martian invaders with their high technology and heat rays seemed unstoppable, and swept all before them, until lowly Earth pathogens utterly destroyed them as they had no immunity.

    This was something completely unexpected. It will likely have to be something equally out of left field and unexpected to overcome the situation that we now find ourselves in.

  246. @Derer
    @AP


    Russia did indeed do a stupid thing, for which both Russia and Ukraine are paying a steep price.
     
    How could milking the Washington and Brussels simpleminded players at 33 trillion debt be stupid from Russian point of view. Actually this is the main reason for Putin policy to "go slow". Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.

    It appears that waiting for the removal of Kiev leadership from within and causing economic stress for the adversaries is paying off. Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.

    Replies: @AP

    Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.

    Sure, Russia just volunteered to lose 100k dead over 2 years, for fun.

    Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.

    LOL is that what they believe wherever you are?

    In Germany’s large grocery chain, 1 kg bread: 4 Euros or $4.34

    https://e-center-knauer.edeka-shops.de/en/all-products/bread-pastries/bread/toast-white-bread/lieken-urkorn-fit-vital-weizen-500g-zid4009249002277

    In the USA it’s about $3.00:

    https://stopandshop.com/product/stop-shop-big-daisy-white-bread-20-oz-pkg/56239

    In one of the Moscow grocery stores near one of my wife’s flats, one of the cheaper breads is about $3.00 for a kilogram:

    https://av.ru/i/468307/

    https://av.ru/search/?text=%D1%85%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%B1

    Same as America.

    Now compare incomes of Moscow to America or Germany.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP

    You call that piece of plasticky white foam bread? Wow, they should be giving it away for free - it is toxic. But ok, that's all you have in your world - I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted - quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    The problem is that you are comparing different worlds: some people live normal lives with normal food, and some sit in their cars for 45 minutes to go to WalMart to buy manufactured garbage food. Enjoy. As I said before, to each his own...but you seem quite insecure about that great life you supposedly have.

    Replies: @AP, @John Johnson

  247. @LatW
    @AnonfromTN


    Most likely scenario is that he takes what he considers necessary (e.g., the whole Black sea coast) or inevitable (Russian-speaking East), and creates a puppet state in the remaining rump “Ukraine” (mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat). Policing will be important, returning to the fold won’t.
     
    Very ambitious.

    mostly to ensure that Poland gets diddly-squat
     
    Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).

    Replies: @Beckow, @AnonfromTN

    …Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).

    Good for Poland…they have imported a minority that may have some demands in the future. What does that do for the Nato plan to move to Ukraine? Or for Ukraine?

    How many able bodied Slavs are there in Riga? Half a million? Why don’t you celebrate it? Instead you engage in your atavistic fascism, foaming at the mouth while seeking “revenge”, and lying about Riga’s past – see Gerard above, you got caught prevaricating like with your denial of the Latvian WW2 Nazi SS Division…you guys have no class.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Beckow


    with your denial of the Latvian WW2 Nazi SS Division
     
    SS was German built, that's like saying "Polish concentration camps". It's a German brand, so wouldn't want to appropriate. :)

    How many able bodied Slavs are there in Riga? Half a million?
     
    Assimilating slowly and enjoying life. The numbers changed a while back and are not what you assume. Many of them condemn the invasion into Ukraine.

    Why don’t you celebrate it?
     
    It's not in our customs to "celebrate diversity" and such. We just stop by for friendly banter sometimes.

    Replies: @Gerard1234, @Beckow

  248. So the Houthis are the only one’s in the middle-east beside Hezbollah and Hamas to take on the real enemies of the Arab world, the sycophantic Arab puppet states that allow U.S and Israel to rule the area.

    The Houthis have done more to disrupt the U.S and Israel than all the so-called powerful Arab states combined, now the U.S is looking for a coalition of the willing to send their precious navy to patrol the area.

    How many will do that when the Houthis flood the straits with shipping mines?

    The Houthis can choke shipping in the Area and make the dogs like Egypt pay. Egypt take Israeli stolen gas then look the other way as Palistinians are murdered.

    The Houthis have realized they have immense power and are the new leadership of the Arab world.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr_Chow_Mein

    The Yemen tribes are a wild bunch. In Dorrill's MI6 book he said that only one MI6 officer in the history of the branch at that time had been killed in the line of duty. It was in Yemen in 1963 or so. They cut off the guy's head and paraded it on a stick.

    Replies: @S

    , @ShortOnTime
    @Mr_Chow_Mein

    Don't get your hopes up.

    The Houthis/Ansarullah can't do much more than launch a few missiles at Israel and disrupt some world trade off the coast of Yemen by targeting trade ships. As the attempted Arab oil embargo of the 1970's shows, disrupting the USA's economy to try to stop American armament of Israel and attempting to reverse Israel's battlefield victories doesn't really work.

    It of course may be too premature to predict absolutely everything about the war and the ensuing political arrangements, but the fall of North Gaza to Israel looks like it's only a matter of time. Somewhere from several more weeks to a few months, and it seems almost certain to be an established fact.

    The only weak point Israel and Jews seem to have is that they value their own lives so highly (and view those of non-Jewish goyim so lowly) that they don't have the capacity to endure very high casualties (more than a few thousand dead say, which is hard to see how Hamas, PIJ and Hezbollah can cause).

    The 2 real problems anyone opposed to Israel has yet to address is how can the IDF's many military advantages in Gaza be undone (who exactly is able and willing to intervene with a ground army against the IDF in Gaza?) and that of AIPAC's chokehold on American politics (and Jewish power in the USA more generally). The 2 are connected actually, as although Israel has its own sovereign military-industrial complex with its own heavy weapons systems, the supply of ammunition and munitions for Israel's heavy weaponry almost entirely comes from American stocks.

    This is why I'm getting tired of seeing all these types thinking they can achieve much by "speaking truth to power" against Jews and that Israel's demise is only a matter of being a few moments away, and all that. The proliferation of the imagery of wounded and dead civilians (especially babies and children) from Gaza may be even worse as it doesn't do anything beyond making Israel look terrible and distressing anyone that doesn't have the stomach and hardened heart to endure such scenes without breaking down.

  249. @AP
    @Derer


    Some dense people will never understand that Russia have capability to overrun Ukraine in one month.
     
    Sure, Russia just volunteered to lose 100k dead over 2 years, for fun.

    Ask the German people or American if they are better off at $6.00 bread price.
     
    LOL is that what they believe wherever you are?

    In Germany's large grocery chain, 1 kg bread: 4 Euros or $4.34

    https://e-center-knauer.edeka-shops.de/en/all-products/bread-pastries/bread/toast-white-bread/lieken-urkorn-fit-vital-weizen-500g-zid4009249002277

    In the USA it's about $3.00:

    https://stopandshop.com/product/stop-shop-big-daisy-white-bread-20-oz-pkg/56239

    In one of the Moscow grocery stores near one of my wife's flats, one of the cheaper breads is about $3.00 for a kilogram:

    https://av.ru/i/468307/

    https://av.ru/search/?text=%D1%85%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%B1

    Same as America.

    Now compare incomes of Moscow to America or Germany.

    Replies: @Beckow

    You call that piece of plasticky white foam bread? Wow, they should be giving it away for free – it is toxic. But ok, that’s all you have in your world – I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted – quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    The problem is that you are comparing different worlds: some people live normal lives with normal food, and some sit in their cars for 45 minutes to go to WalMart to buy manufactured garbage food. Enjoy. As I said before, to each his own…but you seem quite insecure about that great life you supposedly have.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow

    The guy making a bitter two paragraph diatribe in response to my comparisons of cheap breads in each country says someone else is insecure :-)

    In America one choose what one wants. I mostly buy bread at the bakery in Wholefoods where it costs $5.00 for a loaf (not sure how much per kg). It is good. Sometime I go to a Polish store where they also have good bread, cheaper. I have never bought the $3.00 per kg American bread, perhaps since when I was a poor student 30+ years ago.

    I visit Montreal a few times a year. The bakeries there are equal to the best anywhere else. A loaf of bread in one of them is only $3.00 Canadian.

    You like to write about Wal Mart. It must have really touched your soul. I don’t believe that you only went there twice.

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @John Johnson
    @Beckow

    I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted – quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    Walmart carries Dave's bread and the ingredients are listed.
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Dave-s-Killer-Bread-21-Whole-Grains-and-Seeds-Organic-Bread-Loaf-27-oz/49342184?athbdg=L1600&from=/search

    You can even call the company and ask about the bread.
    https://www.daveskillerbread.com/

    Tell us exactly how it isn't real bread compared to what you can buy in Germany.

    When did you last visit Walmart? 1995?

    Replies: @Beckow, @Mikel

  250. @S
    @QCIC


    Definitely predictive programming.
     
    Yes, I see the movie as being some rather blunt 'predictive programming'

    Modern fat, dumb and happy (drugged) Americans aren’t violent enough for a civil war. Civilizational collapse maybe, but not a war.
     
    Here we'll probably have to agree to disagree.

    I think the United States (not to mention the whole of the Anglosphere) may well experience what Russia experienced 1917-22 as described in the linked below book Imperial Apocalypse, ie defeat in a world war, Communist Revolution, a 'civil war' featuring roving ethnic/political armies led by warlords and characterized by mass executions, a pandemic, and economic collapse, all near simultaneously.

    https://academic.oup.com/book/12205?login=false

    I say this with the caveat that I think the US may experience something worse than what Russia did then as Russia did not have 40 million weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding 'reparations', and did not have the high number of personal firearms with their associated mountains of ammo.

    I'd much prefer your more sanguine vision of things be the correct one, however. :-)

    Replies: @QCIC, @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death

    weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding ‘reparations’

    Reminder that Putin secret service operatives were also outright inciting/amplifying and paying for organizing all this “gimme black slavery/genocide reparations” stuff in US long before 2022 invasion in UA happened:

    https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/22123394/ionov-indictment.pdf

    • Replies: @S
    @sudden death


    Reminder that Putin secret service operatives were also outright inciting/amplifying and paying for organizing all this “gimme black slavery/genocide reparations” stuff in US long before 2022 invasion in UA happened:
     
    Thanks. Also reminds of Soviet defector Anatoly Golitsyn's claim that the 'liberalizing' of the Soviet Union was a deep fake, and that some day, when the time was right, Russia and China would openly join together as one clenched fist and overwhelm the United States and the West.

    https://archive.org/details/NewLiesForOld
  251. @Mr_Chow_Mein
    So the Houthis are the only one's in the middle-east beside Hezbollah and Hamas to take on the real enemies of the Arab world, the sycophantic Arab puppet states that allow U.S and Israel to rule the area.

    The Houthis have done more to disrupt the U.S and Israel than all the so-called powerful Arab states combined, now the U.S is looking for a coalition of the willing to send their precious navy to patrol the area.

    How many will do that when the Houthis flood the straits with shipping mines?

    The Houthis can choke shipping in the Area and make the dogs like Egypt pay. Egypt take Israeli stolen gas then look the other way as Palistinians are murdered.

    The Houthis have realized they have immense power and are the new leadership of the Arab world.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @ShortOnTime

    The Yemen tribes are a wild bunch. In Dorrill’s MI6 book he said that only one MI6 officer in the history of the branch at that time had been killed in the line of duty. It was in Yemen in 1963 or so. They cut off the guy’s head and paraded it on a stick.

    • Replies: @S
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    In Dorrill’s MI6 book he said that only one MI6 officer in the history of the branch at that time had been killed in the line of duty. It was in Yemen in 1963 or so. They cut off the guy’s head and paraded it on a stick.
     
    And, to think, that in past ages the Brits would of went to war over something like that. :-)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Jenkins%27_Ear

    Replies: @songbird, @Wokechoke

  252. @AP
    @Mikel


    Of course it’s all being paid by us taxpayers.

    No, it’s not. How can that be, when it was already purchased decades ago?


    I have already explained why all supplemental appropriations bills add to the existing deficit and are therefore paid by taxpayers.
     
    And I explained that the part of the bill involving weapons acquisition by Ukraine costs America nothing or almost nothing (it costs transportation minus the savings for America not having to decommission and dispose of them) because the weapons that Ukraine is getting are mostly those that were made and purchased decades ago. It is accounted for by replacement cost. Which means that the USA spends that money on itself by replacing old and obsolete weapons sent to Ukraine, with new ones.

    You conveniently ignored that explanation. Why?

    (at least you did not attempt to "win" the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due).

    Debating your ideas about an invasion of space aliens being good for the economy (which is what you are arguing, whether you know it or not)
     
    You should just be open in stating that you want America to be demilitarized to some extent, and oppose increasing the capacity of America's defense industries and improving and modernizing America's military.

    And we all know that you don’t support the Ukraine aid bill because of how good it is for the economy anyway
     
    Things can be good for both.

    The Ukraine aid bill helps Ukraine fight off its invader, punishes a country for invading another country, while also contributing to the modernization of America's military, the revival of its military industry, and helping the economy of the communities in America's heartland that are supported by the military industries. Lots of wins.

    Replies: @Mikel

    at least you did not attempt to “win” the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due

    Thanks. I’d love to return the favor and say that you’re not being a moron this time but then I would be lying indeed and I don’t do that.

    While we all understand why you do it, using moronic arguments to try to convince people that spending so many billions on Ukraine is actually good for the US economy is a futile exercise. Nobody buys it and it ends up being counterproductive for the Ukrainian cause. The Dems have been using lots of arguments in favor of the aid but that’s not one of them.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mikel

    Yes, of course you ignored that the part of the Ukraine aid bill that involving weapons acquisition by Ukraine costs America nothing or almost nothing (it costs transportation minus the savings for America not having to decommission and dispose of them) because the weapons that Ukraine is getting are mostly those that were made and purchased decades ago. It is accounted for by replacement cost. Which means that the USA spends that money on itself by replacing old and obsolete weapons sent to Ukraine, with new ones.


    using moronic arguments to try to convince people that spending so many billions on Ukraine is actually good for the US economy
     
    I never claimed it was good “for the US economy.” I said it can be. Have you managed to regress and start lying, right after I praised your effort? Bad boy.

    I just showed that a lot of it is spent not in Ukraine but in the USA and thus the claims by some irresponsible politicians that the cost of the aid is all money sent to Ukraine are false.

    It’s certainly good for communities that have those factories and good for the US military. I make no claims about whether it is good or bad for the US economy to modernise the US military and support the American defence industry using tax dollars. It can be, I suppose. You claim it is bad for the US economy?

    Calling me a moron is a lie too, so you’ve really regressed :-(

  253. @Beckow
    @AP

    You call that piece of plasticky white foam bread? Wow, they should be giving it away for free - it is toxic. But ok, that's all you have in your world - I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted - quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    The problem is that you are comparing different worlds: some people live normal lives with normal food, and some sit in their cars for 45 minutes to go to WalMart to buy manufactured garbage food. Enjoy. As I said before, to each his own...but you seem quite insecure about that great life you supposedly have.

    Replies: @AP, @John Johnson

    The guy making a bitter two paragraph diatribe in response to my comparisons of cheap breads in each country says someone else is insecure 🙂

    In America one choose what one wants. I mostly buy bread at the bakery in Wholefoods where it costs $5.00 for a loaf (not sure how much per kg). It is good. Sometime I go to a Polish store where they also have good bread, cheaper. I have never bought the $3.00 per kg American bread, perhaps since when I was a poor student 30+ years ago.

    I visit Montreal a few times a year. The bakeries there are equal to the best anywhere else. A loaf of bread in one of them is only $3.00 Canadian.

    You like to write about Wal Mart. It must have really touched your soul. I don’t believe that you only went there twice.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP

    I pointed out that your bread comparison was silly. With you response you confirmed it - but your inability to see things in perspective, to understand that comparisons are relative and very imperfect is always there. That is insecurity. In Montreal I wouldn't do only bread, try their bagels - probably the best.

    Replies: @AP

  254. @Mikel
    @AP


    at least you did not attempt to “win” the argument by lying this time. Credit where credit is due
     
    Thanks. I'd love to return the favor and say that you're not being a moron this time but then I would be lying indeed and I don't do that.

    While we all understand why you do it, using moronic arguments to try to convince people that spending so many billions on Ukraine is actually good for the US economy is a futile exercise. Nobody buys it and it ends up being counterproductive for the Ukrainian cause. The Dems have been using lots of arguments in favor of the aid but that's not one of them.

    Replies: @AP

    Yes, of course you ignored that the part of the Ukraine aid bill that involving weapons acquisition by Ukraine costs America nothing or almost nothing (it costs transportation minus the savings for America not having to decommission and dispose of them) because the weapons that Ukraine is getting are mostly those that were made and purchased decades ago. It is accounted for by replacement cost. Which means that the USA spends that money on itself by replacing old and obsolete weapons sent to Ukraine, with new ones.

    using moronic arguments to try to convince people that spending so many billions on Ukraine is actually good for the US economy

    I never claimed it was good “for the US economy.” I said it can be. Have you managed to regress and start lying, right after I praised your effort? Bad boy.

    I just showed that a lot of it is spent not in Ukraine but in the USA and thus the claims by some irresponsible politicians that the cost of the aid is all money sent to Ukraine are false.

    It’s certainly good for communities that have those factories and good for the US military. I make no claims about whether it is good or bad for the US economy to modernise the US military and support the American defence industry using tax dollars. It can be, I suppose. You claim it is bad for the US economy?

    Calling me a moron is a lie too, so you’ve really regressed 🙁

  255. @Gerard1234
    @Noviop Co-Prosperity Sphere

    Just to repeat my reply from the previous thread you may have missed :


    Yea, Riga does count very much – since Riga was mostly built by Germans and Latvians. They did not have a substantial presence compared to Latvians. Do not ever bring up Riga again in these conversations.

     

    Wow, I could not let this garbage written to Beckow pass.
    This is ridiculous….the first Riga architect that enters anyones head immediately is Eisenstein you idiot. Technically Jewish, but more than classifies enough to be considered a Russian architect. Then second name is Antonov – with him and Eisenstein the quality and quantity of their buildings around Riga is what makes them the primary ones anybody thinks of. Then after that its several excellent german architects, Swedes,Jews and many more Russian architects and engineers. Only AFTER that list do we get to minuscule number of Latvians “building” Riga you retarded idiot. Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg. How can trash like you lie so much?

    Outside of Old Riga (which still has several buildings designed by Russian architects, and of course zero by Latvian ones) – what wasn’t designed by Russians …..was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money, and ALL these were project managed by Russians , on orders of RUSSIANS so that these structures suit RUSSIAN tastes and interests you serial dumbfuck.

    I just can’t believe how much of a lying POS you have to be to write that nonsense to Beckow.
    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians. There is the Cultural Palace, I think the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built, the massive bandstand at Mezhapark entirely Soviet/Russian project you imbecile in the architecture and the ethos of it ( travelling in Europe I haven’t seen a bandstand close to the size or style). MinNauk building is basically like one of the Seven sisters and, again, impossible to miss as the tallest building in Riga. The old stock exchange. The Ridzene hotel a typical soviet beauty ( and I think the top 3 hotels that I know of there are Russian built)

    Then of course there is the Gorky bridge (and ANY bridge over the Daugava you dipshit), and EVERY bit of big public infrastructure that exists in Riga providing the water, heat, taking the sewage away of anybody living in Riga, road – EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.

    Whole neighbourhoods of the Riga conurbation built by the Soviets/Russians. Several well-known mansions from Tsarists times designed by Russians around Riga.

    Then I clearly remember visiting (as its at the most directly opposite the lovely (German) Riga Cathedral)……….the lovely Russia insurance society building which is definitely Russian-made, with joined to it the Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect. So in arguably the focal point of the city, the country – the Dom square the biggest and most relaxed square in the city, with the prestigious and beautiful German cathedral…….and directly opposite it around the square are definitely 1 , probably 2 large Russian buildings. Nowhere is there anything Latvian ( except for the retard red/brown – white flags LOL)

    Masses of Old Believers and Russian merchants found there way into Riga pre and early Tsarist era. ROC churches are a HUGE part of Riga you dickhead (certainly for the tourists). Its impossible to imagine Riga without these masterpiece churches, impossible to imagine Riga WITH “latvian” churches. There is the historic Moscow Forshstadt area ( where the MinNauk building is) and going through Riga I remember you can still see several wooden clad buildings………which means RUSSIAN (either Old Believers or Merchants) houses as the others would have the brick or stone exterior buildings. In none of this , is there such a thing as “Latvian” architecture you worthless, lying , pathetic scumbag.

    So key, historic landmarks, key and extensive infrastructure covering the public, cultural, education, finance sectors…. the entire city owing its existence to Russian people and Russian money , LMAO.

    That’s also not even taking into consideration the pre-Tsarist German and Swedish buildings destroyed during WW2 and rebuilt to a wonderful standard by the Soviets ……..or those masterful Tsarist Russian buildings that the Soviets removed, or the some of the masterful Stalinist-era buildings Khrushchev-era removed.

    Replies: @LatW, @LatW

    As typical, your post is filled with lies and manipulations with context.

    Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg.

    Various nationalities were educated in St Pete, but prior to the establishment of our own university, we received our higher education at the Tartu University – one of the oldest in the region (founded by Swedes). As to Latvian architects of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, some of them were educated in Paris or Italy (not just St Pete).

    A long list of notable buildings have been designed by ethnic Latvian architects (with the help of our own local construction company owners).

    Old Riga

    This is the most important area of the city, culturally speaking (but also commercially) – and it was not built by the Russian Empire at all, but over the centuries through a mix of German, Latvian and some Swedish efforts. Side note about the Baltic Germans:

    The Baltic Germans are an artificial nationality created through a colonization and assimilation process that spanned centuries and, while they retained an ethnic German core, they were not fully German. In a socially upward move, some locals (as well as some outside nationalities) blended into that nationality (which coincided with a higher social class). Yes, including Balts and Estonians.

    The well known Lieven family claims to be the descendants of the Liv tribal chieftain (Kaupo of the 13th century), hence their last name (Lieven means the Livs in German – so the origins of this family are not even Germanic but Baltic Finnic).

    [MORE]

    was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money

    There was no such thing as “Russian money”, that was the Imperial treasury, also there was a lot of money that was generated in place and Riga had its own treasury.

    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians.

    The Riga Market has stood there since time immemorial, and was mentioned already in the 16th century. In 1922, large construction was undertaken there by an ethnic Latvian architect and the Riga City Council (also ethnic LV).

    the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built

    No. The Central Bank building was designed by an ethnic Latvian architect (Augusts Reinbergs), and the Riga Bourse building – by a Baltic German.

    The Riga Castle was built during the Livonian times (13th cent, although apparently there had been a building there even before).

    Main churches – the Dome, St Pete’s, all the Catholic churches downtown, the Anglican church – were all there before the Russian Empire even showed up.

    The list goes on. Of course, there was some notable presence of the Russian Empire resources there, however, take together, majority of the city is built by Germans and Latvians, as I originally stated. Through the period of its more rapid growth (late 19th cent – early 20th cent), Latvians had been fully emancipated for a long time already and owned many business enterprises, not to mention that there was a thriving professional class and a large working class Latvian population that was also literate.

    Masses of Old Believers

    Not masses, but the largest proportion outside Russia, yes. Old Believers have been a loyal minority for a long time now. Many of them have spoken Latvian for a long time, probably even before the 1930s (along with their old Russian dialect).

    As to Old Believer merchants, they were like fish looking for deeper waters – they were not some selfless contributors, but simply tried to found enterprises closer to Europe for transportation purposes, also because the commercial culture in the Baltics was smoother than in the Slavic parts
    of the Russian Empire.

    EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.

    The Soviet leadership was in most cases ethnic Latvian, the construction workers, too (probably in some cases managers as well). You simply pretend they didn’t exist.

    Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect.

    No, the architect was a Litvak (may have spoken Yiddish, and most likely spoke Latvian or Lithuanian, too, since he was from Kaunas).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Mandelstamm

    Construction was interrupted by WW1, then finished in 1926 by ethnic Latvians during the first republic.

    In the last 30 years, during the second republic, a few prominent buildings have been erected (most notably the National Library, the Castle of Light), as well as countless residential buildings (mostly Nordic and Lithuanian investment), countless renovated churches and historical landmarks (including Orthodox churches, so you might want to thank us for maintaining heritage that has connections with you).

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @LatW
    @LatW


    Various nationalities were educated in St Pete
     
    By the way, if we took a deeper dive into the academic institutions in St Pete - we'd see that there are a lot of Germans present, especially at the very early, founding stages and often the first rectors are also German.
  256. @Beckow
    @LatW


    ...Poland has already gotten a million able bodied new Slavs (probably more).
     
    Good for Poland...they have imported a minority that may have some demands in the future. What does that do for the Nato plan to move to Ukraine? Or for Ukraine?

    How many able bodied Slavs are there in Riga? Half a million? Why don't you celebrate it? Instead you engage in your atavistic fascism, foaming at the mouth while seeking "revenge", and lying about Riga's past - see Gerard above, you got caught prevaricating like with your denial of the Latvian WW2 Nazi SS Division...you guys have no class.

    Replies: @LatW

    with your denial of the Latvian WW2 Nazi SS Division

    SS was German built, that’s like saying “Polish concentration camps”. It’s a German brand, so wouldn’t want to appropriate. 🙂

    How many able bodied Slavs are there in Riga? Half a million?

    Assimilating slowly and enjoying life. The numbers changed a while back and are not what you assume. Many of them condemn the invasion into Ukraine.

    Why don’t you celebrate it?

    It’s not in our customs to “celebrate diversity” and such. We just stop by for friendly banter sometimes.

    • Replies: @Gerard1234
    @LatW


    Many of them condemn the invasion into Ukraine
     
    Its a criminal offense if they support the invasion you dipshit - in public or private. Not clear if you are only talking about those "lucky" enough to not be non-citizens in the Nazi-loser state.


    It’s not in our customs to “celebrate diversity” and such
     
    LMAO - but you just have entire Russian,German and Jewish stuff all around you that made the country ........but claim it as your own culture you demented moron!

    Plenty of diversity with your German-Jew President and American-homo PM ( or is that the FM?Where these freaks just replaced?........I just don't give a f**k about this non-entity of a country to look into it). No surprise this diversity for a cuckhold state.
    , @Beckow
    @LatW


    Latvian SS was German built
     
    Populated by Latvians, most of them volunteers who wanted to be in SS. But even that you couldn't do by yourself, the servitude to Germans seems to be in the Latvian blood.

    There were no Poles as guards in the concentration camps - but the Ukies were there. Poles to their credit didn't collaborate - maybe most were not given the option. Donald Tusk's grandfather was in SS, he was probably "Aryan" enough...Most Poles were mercilessly slaughtered until Russian saved them. Poles forgot who was killing them, but will never forgive the Russians for putting a stop to it. As they say "chujova rasa"...


    Many of them condemn the invasion into Ukraine.
     
    As you Latvians condemn the "imperialists" under the commies, and before that the "Bolsheviks" under the Germans...it is called human nature. Why do you take it seriously only when it suits you?

    Replies: @LatW, @AP

  257. @AP
    @AnonfromTN


    Polish anti-Russian stance has much deeper root, which has manifested itself even before Napoleon: severe inferiority complex. People with this affliction never forgive anyone successful.
     
    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

    Replies: @Cesar1191, @Mr. XYZ

    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles. lol. By what metric could this possibly be true? It is certainly not true for GDP per capita, life expectancy, industrial production per capita, science production per capita, AIDS prevalence, etc.

    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism, and more importantly, about continued Russian imperialism and the continued threat that the country poses to its neighbors. Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Cesar1191


    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism
     
    That, and the difficulty in our communication stems from the fact that today's Russians feel entitled to all of the successes and possessions of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, they also want to have the rights and the perception of a master race, even though the average Russian is in no way superior to an average Pole, Balt or Ukrainian (and hasn't been historically). When we communicate as equals then there are no problems typically. The problems are caused by these conflated and artificially misplaced identities. Apex fallacies.
    , @AP
    @Cesar1191


    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles
     
    They are successful in the sense that they had a large empire more recently (until 1917), and were the main ethnicity of the post-Russian Soviet empire, although they and the people under them were often miserable, whereas Poland disappeared for awhile and never restored its lost power.

    In all other areas, Russians are less successful than the Poles.


    Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.
     
    When one sets aside the political culture, Russians are normal and decent people, like other Slavs. From the Polish POV, they are primitive and unrefined but very "human." Poles though that regular Russians were also victims of the Soviets and did not blame them that much for Soviet crimes.

    However, as it has become clear that regular Russians respect Stalin, that they support Putin/Putinism and Russian imperialism, they have "earned" the responsibility for Soviet and now post-Soviet crimes. The politics an no longer be separated from the people. Accordingly, the Russian people are viewed much more negatively than they were before by Poles.

    Replies: @Cesar1191

  258. @AP
    @Beckow

    The guy making a bitter two paragraph diatribe in response to my comparisons of cheap breads in each country says someone else is insecure :-)

    In America one choose what one wants. I mostly buy bread at the bakery in Wholefoods where it costs $5.00 for a loaf (not sure how much per kg). It is good. Sometime I go to a Polish store where they also have good bread, cheaper. I have never bought the $3.00 per kg American bread, perhaps since when I was a poor student 30+ years ago.

    I visit Montreal a few times a year. The bakeries there are equal to the best anywhere else. A loaf of bread in one of them is only $3.00 Canadian.

    You like to write about Wal Mart. It must have really touched your soul. I don’t believe that you only went there twice.

    Replies: @Beckow

    I pointed out that your bread comparison was silly. With you response you confirmed it – but your inability to see things in perspective, to understand that comparisons are relative and very imperfect is always there. That is insecurity. In Montreal I wouldn’t do only bread, try their bagels – probably the best.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    I pointed out that your bread comparison was silly.
     
    You pointed out that American mass-produced bread is terrible. So?

    but your inability to see things in perspective, to understand that comparisons are relative and very imperfect is always there
     
    Of course they are imperfect. The point is that American (and German) breads are not $6.00 and are not much more pricy than breads in Moscow, which is while wealthy by Russian standards is still poorer than USA or Germany.

    In Montreal I wouldn’t do only bread, try their bagels – probably the best.
     
    They are proud of them, but Montreal bagels are not much better than what one can find in the Northeastern USA. The famous smoked meat store with the long lines is overrated IMO.

    The bread, pastries, cakes, etc. OTOH are much better, and cheaper.

    If anyone is reading this and going to Montreal, here is an excellent local chain:

    https://premieremoisson.com/en

    I was wrong about the bread price there, it isn't $3.00 Canadian but $5.00 Canadian ($3.75
    American) for a loaf.

    https://premieremoisson.com/en/products/bakery/white-breads/belgian-sourdough-bread

    Replies: @Beckow

  259. @Cesar1191
    @AP


    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

     

    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles. lol. By what metric could this possibly be true? It is certainly not true for GDP per capita, life expectancy, industrial production per capita, science production per capita, AIDS prevalence, etc.

    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism, and more importantly, about continued Russian imperialism and the continued threat that the country poses to its neighbors. Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.

    Replies: @LatW, @AP

    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism

    That, and the difficulty in our communication stems from the fact that today’s Russians feel entitled to all of the successes and possessions of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, they also want to have the rights and the perception of a master race, even though the average Russian is in no way superior to an average Pole, Balt or Ukrainian (and hasn’t been historically). When we communicate as equals then there are no problems typically. The problems are caused by these conflated and artificially misplaced identities. Apex fallacies.

  260. @LatW
    @Gerard1234

    As typical, your post is filled with lies and manipulations with context.


    Even then most of that small number were educated in Saint Petersburg.
     
    Various nationalities were educated in St Pete, but prior to the establishment of our own university, we received our higher education at the Tartu University - one of the oldest in the region (founded by Swedes). As to Latvian architects of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, some of them were educated in Paris or Italy (not just St Pete).

    A long list of notable buildings have been designed by ethnic Latvian architects (with the help of our own local construction company owners).

    Old Riga
     
    This is the most important area of the city, culturally speaking (but also commercially) - and it was not built by the Russian Empire at all, but over the centuries through a mix of German, Latvian and some Swedish efforts. Side note about the Baltic Germans:

    The Baltic Germans are an artificial nationality created through a colonization and assimilation process that spanned centuries and, while they retained an ethnic German core, they were not fully German. In a socially upward move, some locals (as well as some outside nationalities) blended into that nationality (which coincided with a higher social class). Yes, including Balts and Estonians.

    The well known Lieven family claims to be the descendants of the Liv tribal chieftain (Kaupo of the 13th century), hence their last name (Lieven means the Livs in German – so the origins of this family are not even Germanic but Baltic Finnic).

    was built ENTIRELY on RUSSIAN money
     
    There was no such thing as "Russian money", that was the Imperial treasury, also there was a lot of money that was generated in place and Riga had its own treasury.

    The Riga Market is impossible to miss…….and entirely built by Russians.
     
    The Riga Market has stood there since time immemorial, and was mentioned already in the 16th century. In 1922, large construction was undertaken there by an ethnic Latvian architect and the Riga City Council (also ethnic LV).

    the Latvian Central Bank building is Russian built
     
    No. The Central Bank building was designed by an ethnic Latvian architect (Augusts Reinbergs), and the Riga Bourse building - by a Baltic German.

    The Riga Castle was built during the Livonian times (13th cent, although apparently there had been a building there even before).

    Main churches - the Dome, St Pete's, all the Catholic churches downtown, the Anglican church - were all there before the Russian Empire even showed up.

    The list goes on. Of course, there was some notable presence of the Russian Empire resources there, however, take together, majority of the city is built by Germans and Latvians, as I originally stated. Through the period of its more rapid growth (late 19th cent - early 20th cent), Latvians had been fully emancipated for a long time already and owned many business enterprises, not to mention that there was a thriving professional class and a large working class Latvian population that was also literate.

    Masses of Old Believers
     
    Not masses, but the largest proportion outside Russia, yes. Old Believers have been a loyal minority for a long time now. Many of them have spoken Latvian for a long time, probably even before the 1930s (along with their old Russian dialect).

    As to Old Believer merchants, they were like fish looking for deeper waters - they were not some selfless contributors, but simply tried to found enterprises closer to Europe for transportation purposes, also because the commercial culture in the Baltics was smoother than in the Slavic parts
    of the Russian Empire.


    EVERYTHING is Russian made , mainly from the Soviets but plenty from Tsarist era.
     
    The Soviet leadership was in most cases ethnic Latvian, the construction workers, too (probably in some cases managers as well). You simply pretend they didn't exist.

    Radiodom – which I think was also built by a Russian architect.
     
    No, the architect was a Litvak (may have spoken Yiddish, and most likely spoke Latvian or Lithuanian, too, since he was from Kaunas).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Mandelstamm

    Construction was interrupted by WW1, then finished in 1926 by ethnic Latvians during the first republic.

    In the last 30 years, during the second republic, a few prominent buildings have been erected (most notably the National Library, the Castle of Light), as well as countless residential buildings (mostly Nordic and Lithuanian investment), countless renovated churches and historical landmarks (including Orthodox churches, so you might want to thank us for maintaining heritage that has connections with you).

    Replies: @LatW

    Various nationalities were educated in St Pete

    By the way, if we took a deeper dive into the academic institutions in St Pete – we’d see that there are a lot of Germans present, especially at the very early, founding stages and often the first rectors are also German.

  261. @Beckow
    @AP

    I pointed out that your bread comparison was silly. With you response you confirmed it - but your inability to see things in perspective, to understand that comparisons are relative and very imperfect is always there. That is insecurity. In Montreal I wouldn't do only bread, try their bagels - probably the best.

    Replies: @AP

    I pointed out that your bread comparison was silly.

    You pointed out that American mass-produced bread is terrible. So?

    but your inability to see things in perspective, to understand that comparisons are relative and very imperfect is always there

    Of course they are imperfect. The point is that American (and German) breads are not $6.00 and are not much more pricy than breads in Moscow, which is while wealthy by Russian standards is still poorer than USA or Germany.

    In Montreal I wouldn’t do only bread, try their bagels – probably the best.

    They are proud of them, but Montreal bagels are not much better than what one can find in the Northeastern USA. The famous smoked meat store with the long lines is overrated IMO.

    The bread, pastries, cakes, etc. OTOH are much better, and cheaper.

    If anyone is reading this and going to Montreal, here is an excellent local chain:

    https://premieremoisson.com/en

    I was wrong about the bread price there, it isn’t $3.00 Canadian but $5.00 Canadian ($3.75
    American) for a loaf.

    https://premieremoisson.com/en/products/bakery/white-breads/belgian-sourdough-bread

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP


    ...but Montreal bagels are not much better than what one can find in the Northeastern USA.
     
    You have crossed the red line!...Montreal bagels are tastier, smaller, baked the old fashioned way. To say "not much better" is to miss the whole point of eating, one should aspire for the best.

    Most Americans have been eating what is basically manufactured garbage food for a few generations. It shows: fatness, lack of any shape, inflamed faces from too much food toxicity. It was a Faustian bargain in the mid-20th century to go for cheap, mass-produced food: survive and be happy on plentiful carbohydrates while slowly destroying the genetics.

    You will point out that there are exceptions, and that is correct: as in other areas Americans are split between the smart, comfortable, healthy minority and the mass of struggling survivors. The mass immigration from the Third World has made it much worse. In similar societies in the past, the masses eventually overwhelm the minority. When one travels around US there are whole areas that have gone into fatalistic eat-you-way-through-life sub-existence...the lack of style or any sense for public beauty doesn't help.

    And old rule in the nature is that an oasis never spreads, the surrounding desert does.

    Replies: @QCIC, @AP

  262. This is a good eyewitness account of the Russian Civil War entitled Cursed Days; A Diary of Revolution by Ivan Bunin. The term ‘civil war’ seems to be a misnomer, as in reality it seemed to be a war led by Communists targeting the organic identity of the Russian people.

    A similar ‘civil war’ in the United States would be primarily a war against the remnant organic identity of the Anglo-Saxons.

    https://archive.org/details/cursed-days-a-diary-of-revolu-bunin-ivan-alekseevich-1870-1/page/31/mode/1up

    ‘The last time I was in Petersburg was in early April ’17 . Then something unimaginable had just happened in the world. One of the very greatest countries on earth was thrown to the full whim of fate —and not just at any time but during a very great world war. The trenches still stretched for three thousand miles in the west, but they had already become simple pits.’

    ‘The deed was done, and in a way that was simply unprecedented and absurd. A power that had extended over three million miles, and that had comprised an armed horde, an army of millions of men, was transferred into the hands of “commissars,” of journalists such as SoboP and Yordansky.’

    ‘But more awesome was the fact that the magnificent, centuries-old life that had reigned throughout the entire great expanse of Russia was suddenly cut short and replaced by a bewildering existence, one that was rooted in a pointless, holidaylike atmosphere and in an unnatural abandonment of everything that human society had lived by.’

    • Thanks: Emil Nikola Richard
    • Replies: @LatW
    @S


    ".. the magnificent, centuries-old life that had reigned throughout the entire great expanse of Russia.."
     
    Especially starting at 8:13...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gby5qSOwtSM

    Replies: @S

    , @John Johnson
    @S

    This is a good eyewitness account of the Russian Civil War entitled Cursed Days; A Diary of Revolution by Ivan Bunin. The term ‘civil war’ seems to be a misnomer, as in reality it seemed to be a war led by Communists targeting the organic identity of the Russian people.

    It's not a misnomer. A civil war did occur and with full scale battles involving millions of combatants across multiple countries:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Civil_War

    The Russian Revolution was more than storming the Kremlin.

    Most of the Russian military chose to back the Communists and then rampaged in not just Russia but Ukraine, Belarus and other neighboring countries where the majority did not want Communism.

    The Russian military got their asses kicked by the Germans in WW1 and then went to war for 6 years against their own kind for the Reds. An extremely dysgenic civil war whereby anyone not wanting to be part of the revolution could just slip into Western Europe or head to the US. Basically anyone with talent that doesn't buy into Marxist bullshit.

    Replies: @Gerard1234, @S

  263. @Cesar1191
    @AP


    You forgot the projection part by Russians, whose inferiority complex towards the West can be rather extreme.

     

    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles. lol. By what metric could this possibly be true? It is certainly not true for GDP per capita, life expectancy, industrial production per capita, science production per capita, AIDS prevalence, etc.

    It seems more reasonable to me to assume that anti-Russian sentiment in Poland is due to anger/resentment about Russian imperialism, and more importantly, about continued Russian imperialism and the continued threat that the country poses to its neighbors. Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.

    Replies: @LatW, @AP

    Imagine thinking that the Russians are successful compared to the Poles

    They are successful in the sense that they had a large empire more recently (until 1917), and were the main ethnicity of the post-Russian Soviet empire, although they and the people under them were often miserable, whereas Poland disappeared for awhile and never restored its lost power.

    In all other areas, Russians are less successful than the Poles.

    Poland and Russia relations were much better in the 90s and 2000s. The Poles never forgot that Russia was a potential threat, but for a while they were willing to entertain the idea that Russia could be a normal European country.

    When one sets aside the political culture, Russians are normal and decent people, like other Slavs. From the Polish POV, they are primitive and unrefined but very “human.” Poles though that regular Russians were also victims of the Soviets and did not blame them that much for Soviet crimes.

    However, as it has become clear that regular Russians respect Stalin, that they support Putin/Putinism and Russian imperialism, they have “earned” the responsibility for Soviet and now post-Soviet crimes. The politics an no longer be separated from the people. Accordingly, the Russian people are viewed much more negatively than they were before by Poles.

    • Replies: @Cesar1191
    @AP


    They are successful in the sense that they had a large empire more recently (until 1917), and were the main ethnicity of the post-Russian Soviet empire, although they and the people under them were often miserable, whereas Poland disappeared for awhile and never restored its lost power.

     

    Yes, the Russians outnumber the Poles and they were the main component of the Russian empire, but you know, most of Switzerland's neighbors outnumber the Swiss and Norway were part of the Danish empire, and yet, I don't think the Swiss and the Norwegians hate other people's success.

    Russia's larger size is relevant because it allows Russia to remain a threat to its neighbors, and it is this threat that is the greatest impediment to good relations. If or when Russia becomes a normal European country, with no more ambitions to invade and/or impose spheres of influence on its neighbors, I think Russia's relationship with its neighbors will be normal and without hostility, and that includes the Ukrainians. Right now Ukrainians hate Russians, for obvious reasons, but time heals these wounds.

    Of course, the tragic irony about Ukraine is that the country was one of the most Russia friendly countries in Europe until 2013 or perhaps even 2022, and that is probably one reason why Ukraine was viewed with suspicion in some European countries, and why many thought that Ukraine could just be left as part of Russia's sphere. Putin was wrong in thinking that East Ukrainians would side with Russia, but East Ukrainians did feel close to the Russian people. There are these videos at the beginning of the war with East Ukrainians saying how betrayed they felt, how they once thought of Russians as a close people, but not anymore.

  264. @sudden death
    @S


    weaponized Blacks spearheading the Communist revolution and demanding ‘reparations’
     
    Reminder that Putin secret service operatives were also outright inciting/amplifying and paying for organizing all this “gimme black slavery/genocide reparations” stuff in US long before 2022 invasion in UA happened:

    https://i.imgur.com/4O266Q1.jpeg

    https://i.imgur.com/oijntnQ.png

    https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/22123394/ionov-indictment.pdf

    Replies: @S

    Reminder that Putin secret service operatives were also outright inciting/amplifying and paying for organizing all this “gimme black slavery/genocide reparations” stuff in US long before 2022 invasion in UA happened:

    Thanks. Also reminds of Soviet defector Anatoly Golitsyn’s claim that the ‘liberalizing’ of the Soviet Union was a deep fake, and that some day, when the time was right, Russia and China would openly join together as one clenched fist and overwhelm the United States and the West.

    https://archive.org/details/NewLiesForOld

    • Thanks: sudden death
  265. @Beckow
    @AP

    You call that piece of plasticky white foam bread? Wow, they should be giving it away for free - it is toxic. But ok, that's all you have in your world - I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted - quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    The problem is that you are comparing different worlds: some people live normal lives with normal food, and some sit in their cars for 45 minutes to go to WalMart to buy manufactured garbage food. Enjoy. As I said before, to each his own...but you seem quite insecure about that great life you supposedly have.

    Replies: @AP, @John Johnson

    I suppose in WalMart? But Germany has excellent breads, not the discount crap that you posted – quality breads in Germany, the real bread, cost 6 to 8 Euros. And they should, it is worth it.

    Walmart carries Dave’s bread and the ingredients are listed.